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Aliso Village Housing Project

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1998 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the semiautomatic gunfire rattled out behind them, 12-year-old Roberto Villapanda turned to see what was happening while his cousin Jesse Urias ran for cover. In the silence that followed, Jesse crouched behind some trash cans, then stepped cautiously into the street. Just a few doors from where they were headed, he found Roberto lying on the lawn, quiet, like he was looking for stars in the cold night.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2000
The Housing Authority announced Friday that 29 families facing eviction from Aliso Village, a public housing project in East Los Angeles, will be relocated to temporary housing and given help finding new homes if they can't find a place to live by the end of April. The announcement was welcomed by the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles, which has been negotiating relocation for the families.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1996
It is often said that children in the inner city grow up too fast. The Los Angeles City Housing Authority on Thursday took a step to prolong childhood when it dedicated seven playgrounds in the Aliso Village Housing Community in Boyle Heights. The 685-unit complex, home to more than 2,500 people, was presented with new green, yellow and white swings, slides, sandboxes, monkey bars, and other playground equipment in a dedication ceremony led by Councilman Richard Alatorre.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It isn't a good time for anybody to be walking down Clarence Street. East L.A.-13, one of the four gangs in and around the Aliso Village housing projects, had been marked for an ambush. But that word on the street doesn't matter to Pastor Pete Bradford. It's Friday night, and his weekly walks through the neighborhood with former gang member Mike Garcia are a holy ritual, a spiritual signature known by the people of Boyle Heights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1999 | JOSEPH TREVINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an effort to cut down on drive-by shootings and reduce crime in Boyle Height's Aliso Village, city Housing Authority officials will install iron fences and gates in all but one of the housing project's entrances. There were more than 35 shootings in Aliso Village last year and six people were killed, Housing Authority Police Chief Ray Palacios said. About half of the incidents were drive-by shootings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1998 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group that opposes the demolition of a Boyle Heights housing project called a news conference Thursday to try to bolster its position but, by the end of the day, the organization came under heavy attack from some tenants, a prominent community leader and city officials. City Housing Authority officials are bent on demolishing the 56-year-old Aliso Village project, calling the units in a gang-plagued neighborhood structurally unsafe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2000
The Housing Authority announced Friday that 29 families facing eviction from Aliso Village, a public housing project in East Los Angeles, will be relocated to temporary housing and given help finding new homes if they can't find a place to live by the end of April. The announcement was welcomed by the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles, which has been negotiating relocation for the families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of the neighboring Pico Gardens and Aliso Village housing projects on Los Angeles' Eastside say tensions with police are rising after several years of relative calm. Activists marched to LAPD headquarters last week to voice their discontent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It isn't a good time for anybody to be walking down Clarence Street. East L.A.-13, one of the four gangs in and around the Aliso Village housing projects, had been marked for an ambush. But that word on the street doesn't matter to Pastor Pete Bradford. It's Friday night, and his weekly walks through the neighborhood with former gang member Mike Garcia are a holy ritual, a spiritual signature known by the people of Boyle Heights.
MAGAZINE
October 15, 1995 | Celeste Fremon, Celeste Fremon is a free-lance writer whose book, "Father Greg & the Homeboys," was published in July by Hyperion. The book resulted from an article for this magazine
At 8:15 on a summer evening, 64 mothers, most of them Latinas, walk in a procession into the parking lot of a tiny stucco church in the poorest part of East Los Angeles. The women carry white candles that they shield from the evening wind. They sing hymns in Spanish as they walk: "I have faith that the men will sing. I have faith that this song will be a song of universal love."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1999 | JOSEPH TREVINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an effort to cut down on drive-by shootings and reduce crime in Boyle Height's Aliso Village, city Housing Authority officials will install iron fences and gates in all but one of the housing project's entrances. There were more than 35 shootings in Aliso Village last year and six people were killed, Housing Authority Police Chief Ray Palacios said. About half of the incidents were drive-by shootings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1998 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the semiautomatic gunfire rattled out behind them, 12-year-old Roberto Villapanda turned to see what was happening while his cousin Jesse Urias ran for cover. In the silence that followed, Jesse crouched behind some trash cans, then stepped cautiously into the street. Just a few doors from where they were headed, he found Roberto lying on the lawn, quiet, like he was looking for stars in the cold night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1998 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group that opposes the demolition of a Boyle Heights housing project called a news conference Thursday to try to bolster its position but, by the end of the day, the organization came under heavy attack from some tenants, a prominent community leader and city officials. City Housing Authority officials are bent on demolishing the 56-year-old Aliso Village project, calling the units in a gang-plagued neighborhood structurally unsafe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1996
It is often said that children in the inner city grow up too fast. The Los Angeles City Housing Authority on Thursday took a step to prolong childhood when it dedicated seven playgrounds in the Aliso Village Housing Community in Boyle Heights. The 685-unit complex, home to more than 2,500 people, was presented with new green, yellow and white swings, slides, sandboxes, monkey bars, and other playground equipment in a dedication ceremony led by Councilman Richard Alatorre.
MAGAZINE
October 15, 1995 | Celeste Fremon, Celeste Fremon is a free-lance writer whose book, "Father Greg & the Homeboys," was published in July by Hyperion. The book resulted from an article for this magazine
At 8:15 on a summer evening, 64 mothers, most of them Latinas, walk in a procession into the parking lot of a tiny stucco church in the poorest part of East Los Angeles. The women carry white candles that they shield from the evening wind. They sing hymns in Spanish as they walk: "I have faith that the men will sing. I have faith that this song will be a song of universal love."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of the neighboring Pico Gardens and Aliso Village housing projects on Los Angeles' Eastside say tensions with police are rising after several years of relative calm. Activists marched to LAPD headquarters last week to voice their discontent.
NEWS
November 14, 1985
A lawsuit claiming that Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates and police intelligence officers conspired to murder a member of a revolutionary Maoist organization was rejected by U.S. District Judge Edward Rafeedie. The Los Angeles judge agreed with city attorneys that the Revolutionary Communist Party and the widow of Damian Garcia failed to provide proof of police involvement in Garcia's stabbing death more than five years ago during a demonstration at a Boyle Heights housing project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1991
The most notorious graffiti vandal in Los Angeles pleaded innocent Tuesday to an allegation that he left his "Chaka" tag on a courthouse elevator, an act that could cost him two years in jail if proved. Daniel Bernardo Ramos, 18, also denied a claim that he had trespassed onto the Griffith Park golf course with his girlfriend, and that they were in possession of a marking pen and less than an ounce of marijuana at the time.
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