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Alito

NATIONAL
January 13, 2006 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court nomination of Samuel A. Alito Jr. received a boost Thursday from a group that usually stays out of such politically charged confirmation battles -- his fellow judges. Seven of Alito's current and former colleagues on the U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee to testify on his behalf. "The Sam Alito that I have sat with for 15 years is not an ideologue," said Senior Judge Edward R. Becker.
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OPINION
January 12, 2006
Re "Alito Tells Skeptical Democrats He Would Keep an Open Mind," Jan. 11 Listening to Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr.'s confirmation hearings, I find it hard to reconcile the centrist views of his testimony with the hard-right tenor of the paper trail he long ago began accumulating as an assistant U.S. attorney in the Reagan administration. I have also listened attentively to his explanations of controversial positions he took as an appellate judge in case after case. Even when Alito was the lone dissenter, as he often seemed to be, his answers to the Senate Judiciary Committee regarding those extremely conservative opinions seemed designed to ward off the merest suggestion that he is, in fact, anything but Sandra Day O'Connor's rightful heir to the swing seat on the Supreme Court.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2006 | Maura Reynolds and Richard Simon, Times Staff Writers
Senate Democrats turned up the heat on Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. on Wednesday, prompting testy exchanges during his confirmation hearing and ardent defenses from Republicans -- one of which moved Alito's wife to tears. As Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) defended the nominee against what he said were unfair insinuations about his membership in a conservative alumni organization, Martha Alito began quietly to weep behind him.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2006 | Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer
With typical Midwestern bluntness, Sen. Charles E. Grassley seemed to say it all when he summed up the state of play on Day 3 of the Senate committee hearing on the nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court. "We've gone over the same ground many times," the Iowa Republican said. "The horse is dead. Quit beating it."
OPINION
January 12, 2006 | Mark Tushnet, MARK TUSHNET, author of "A Court Divided: The Rehnquist Court and the Future of Constitutional Law" (W.W. Norton, 2005), teaches constitutional law at Georgetown University Law Center.
IN HIS OPENING remarks Monday, Samuel A. Alito Jr. told the Senate Judiciary Committee that as a judge his only commitment was to the rule of law, and that he didn't -- and wouldn't -- bring any "agenda" or "preferred outcome" to the Supreme Court. Fair enough. But what exactly does it mean to say that you're committed to the rule of law and nothing else? Consider a case that came before Alito as a federal appeals court judge in 1996. United States vs.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2006 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
In 1972, at the height of one of the most tumultuous times in higher education, a group of Princeton University graduates staged their own form of protest against the changes they saw around them. As college campuses roiled with demonstrations over the Vietnam War, feminism and free speech, Concerned Alumni of Princeton -- co-chaired by wealthy alumni from the classes of 1921 and 1930 -- had a narrower agenda: fighting the admissions policy that opened classrooms to women and minorities.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2006 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
Democrats resembled a guerrilla army searching for a weak point in a heavily guarded fortress Tuesday as they challenged Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. at his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing. The array of issues Democrats raised reflected the breadth of their concerns about the record of Alito, President Bush's choice to succeed retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2006 | Maura Reynolds, David G. Savage and Richard Simon, Times Staff Writers
Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. sought to distance himself Tuesday from conservative political opinions he expressed more than 20 years ago, stressing in his confirmation hearing that good judges did not allow personal views to color their legal judgments. But his comments were greeted with skepticism by Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee, who said Alito's views as a Reagan administration lawyer probably signaled how he would rule as a justice -- especially on abortion.
OPINION
January 11, 2006 | Stephen R. Dujack, Writer/editor STEPHEN R. DUJACK graduated from Princeton and covered CAP for the university's alumni magazine from 1976 to 1986.
IN 21ST CENTURY Washington, fame doesn't last for 15 minutes anymore. It lasts for a single news cycle. There is the big press release. The next morning the major newspapers spell your name right. But by noon the Drudge Report runs a shotgun blast of half-truths and innuendoes, and by evening pundits are sifting through your entrails on CNN and Fox. Can citizen participation in government survive the advent of the Internet search engine?
NATIONAL
January 10, 2006 | Maura Reynolds and David G. Savage, Times Staff Writers
Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr., President Bush's choice for a closely divided Supreme Court, began his Senate confirmation hearings Monday by attempting to assure skeptical Democrats that he is not an ideological conservative with an expansive view of the powers of the presidency. But Democrats pointedly put him on notice that he would be questioned aggressively about his views, particularly on the right to abortion and the president's claim to sweeping authority as commander in chief.
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