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Allergies

NEWS
June 19, 1997 | KARIN PETERSEN HSIAO
For common triggers of allergies and asthma, there's no place like home. "Your home should be a safe place, but for sufferers of allergies and asthma, it can be a source for triggers that set off a reaction," says Dr. Robert Moore, a pediatric pulmonologist at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. In fact, one of the best ways to control allergies and asthma is to do a thorough inventory of possible household triggers.
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NEWS
December 26, 1999
It is so important for parents, doctors, school officials and the public to be informed about how dangerous food allergies can be ("They'd Better Watch Out," Dec. 19). You can educate a child at a very young age and they will be careful, but their friends' parents have to be willing to be sensitive to the seriousness of the problem. And as the child gets older and does not want to be "different," they will take more chances. On June 11, 1993, our grandchild was celebrating her eighth-grade graduation at school and ate a brownie that had peanut oil in it. She died within the hour.
HEALTH
January 23, 2006 | Rosie Mestel
Starting Jan. 1, food labels must also state, in plain English, whether the item contains any of eight foods that are behind 90% of the known food allergies suffered by an estimated 11 million Americans -- milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, soy and wheat. The change is the result of the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, passed by Congress in 2004, and is aimed at clarifying which foods contain potentially dangerous substances.
SPORTS
May 16, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Josh Hamilton said he was assured by doctors this week that the allergies that lead to occasional sinus and throat discomfort and dizziness were not caused or exacerbated by his heavy cocaine use from 2002-2005. "You have a hallway up the middle of your nose and sinus cavities on each side," said Hamilton, whose addiction to drugs and alcohol led to a ban from baseball from 2003-2005. "When you breathe air, it goes up and down the hallway. "Same thing when you do drugs, it goes up the hallway, not into the sinus cavities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports and
Recipients of bone marrow transplants have a good chance of "inheriting" allergies from their donors, according to a University of Washington study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. William Henderson said physicians must be aware of the finding when treating bone marrow transplant recipients, some of whom might not know they've acquired, for example, an allergy to penicillin or other medications and environmental allergens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1999 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
Sniffing, sneezing and watery eyes are a sure sign of spring for hay fever sufferers, but health officials say there are ways to enjoy the great outdoors without being overpowered by pollen. Seasonal allergies can be controlled through medication, pet control and by limiting outdoor activities, said Los Angeles County Public Health Director Jonathan Fielding.
HEALTH
February 16, 2004 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
As terrifying as they may seem at the time, small babies' fevers might make them healthier down the road. Researchers from Henry Ford Health System in Detroit reviewed the medical records of 835 children enrolled at birth in the Childhood Allergy Study and noted any illnesses with documented fevers -- defined as a temperature of at least 101 degrees -- in their first year of life.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | EUGENIA HAWRYLKO / Associated Press
Restaurant workers no longer consider it unusual for a customer to ask if an entree is high in fat, if a product contains salt, or if the establishment has a no-smoking section. Yet many people would consider it an overreaction to give the same attention to avoiding foods to which they're allergic. But food allergies, which are uncomfortable at best--causing nausea, facial swelling, hives and shortness of breath-- can at worst result in a potentially fatal condition called anaphylaxis.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1993 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Amy Bentsen was only six months old when she started to suffer chronic ear infections that required near-constant use of antibiotics. Her mother, Elesa, suspected that allergies were the cause of Amy's ailments, because serious allergy problems ran in the family. But the pediatrician told Elesa not to worry. As long as antibiotics could clear Amy's ears, allergy testing wouldn't be necessary, he says. "In 11 months, I was in the doctor's office 20 times.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | LAURA LAUGHLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cynthia Merrell never had allergy problems before. So she was surprised when, soon after she moved here four years ago from Virginia, she started sniffling and sneezing and suffering from a stuffy nose. "I thought Arizona was supposed to be a good place for people with allergies," she said. Merrell is not alone. Experts say many people, including some physicians, still have an image of Arizona as a haven for allergy sufferers, a dry, clean desert environment that will cure what ails you.
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