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NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Daesang America Inc. is recallingĀ  packages of sesame- and garlic-flavored mixed soy bean paste because they may contain undeclared peanuts, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. People who are allergic to peanuts run the risk of a serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products, according to the FDA. The packages were sold in stores nationwide, and online. No injury or illness has yet been reported. "The product comes in a 500 gram (17.64 ounce)
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HEALTH
April 4, 2014 | By Dana Sullivan Kilroy
Not milk? Choosing milk for your morning cereal or coffee used to be pretty simple: skim, low-fat or whole. These days, though, market shelves and refrigerators are crowded with an array of alternatives: soy, almond, rice, hemp and more. While some people opt for these beverages because they're vegan, they have allergies or because they're lactose intolerant, the beverages are increasingly popular for another reason too. "We're all being encouraged to eat a more plant-based diet, and some of these products fit that category," says Andrea Giancoli, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and a policy analyst at the Beach Cities Health District Blue Zones Project in Hermosa Beach, an initiative to develop healthier communities.
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SPORTS
May 14, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Josh Hamilton said he has changed sinus medication and is scheduled to be tested for allergies, but he wanted to make one thing about his weakened condition perfectly clear. "This has absolutely nothing to do with my .200 batting average," he said. The Angels limited Hamilton to designated hitter Tuesday, one day after the right fielder came out of a game with what Manager Mike Scioscia called dizziness. Hamilton said he has had sinus and throat discomfort for about 10 days and said he hoped a change in medication would help.
SCIENCE
January 30, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Gradual exposure to peanut protein powder over six months helped more than half of kids with peanut allergies learn to tolerate the equivalent of about 10 peanuts per day, according to the results of a new clinical trial. The Phase 2 trial also found that the overwhelming majority of kids who tested the experimental therapy were able to eat the equivalent of about five peanuts each day without having an allergic reaction. This led to significant improvements in the quality of life for the families of these children, according to a report published Thursday by the Lancet.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Hershey Co. is recalling 7.25-ounce plastic bottles of Hershey's Chocolate Shell Topping because the ice cream topping contains undeclared almonds, which could cause a severe or life-threatening reaction in people who have allergies to almonds. The Hershey, Pa., company has received three consumer complaints, spokesman Kirk Saville said. There have been no reports of incidents or injuries. The recalled product, which has the code "69N" printed on the back of the bottle, was sold nationwide after July 8 this year.
TRAVEL
January 14, 2007
IN Jane Engle's article "From Soap to Nuts" [Travel Insider, Jan. 7], she went into extensive detail about the problem with nut allergies, all of which are true. However, never once did she mention another common and very difficult-to-deal-with allergy, and that is allergy to eggs. So many things contain egg: mayonnaise, salad dressings, some breads, almost all cookies and muffins, some pastas, frying batter etc. Hopefully, you will play catch up and address that subject. ALICE N. BESSMAN Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1990
Re articles on Dr. George R. Borrell (Jan. 4 and 6): About 10 years ago, after many years of misery with frequent colds and flu, blocked nose, having to sit up all night, I went to a qualified MD allergist. I was given the 200-plus skin test injections, was told that I was allergic to practically everything in the air and put on a twice-a-week allergy injection program. After some months with no improvement, I was informed that the only solution was to have an operation, in fact two operations, one for each side of my face (sinuses)
MAGAZINE
November 24, 1991
Good Lord! Don't you read Harry Shearer? One week after he provides insight into the horrors of perfume ("Making a Stink," Oct. 13), I get hit with a surprise allergy attack and the weapon is none other than a fragranced page in The Times itself. I'm only amazed that you didn't put the stinky stuff on the page facing "Man Bites Town." EVAN C. HENRY Costa Mesa
TRAVEL
February 29, 2004
Regarding "Ask About Hotel Rules for Fido" [Letters, Feb. 15]: I share my life with a German shepherd who accompanies me wherever she is allowed. If a hotel is involved, its pet policy dictates my choice. I certainly understand allergy concerns, and if you have an allergy to animals, you have the added responsibility to make sure you don't come into contact with them -- much as one with a food allergy must exercise care eating in a restaurant. This surely doesn't mean others in the restaurant can't have what you are allergic to. Dogs are essential to the health and well being of many people, and, as such, they and their human companions deserve equal and fair treatment.
FOOD
June 9, 1999
I was pleased to see several recipes in recent weeks highlighting fava beans and their many uses. However, I was surprised to see them printed without any warning about the potential dangers of fava beans to those carrying the gene for favism, an extreme allergy to favas. Favism is most common among Mediterranean populations, especially those from the islands of Sicily, Sardinia, Crete and Rhodes. The allergy can cause a host of symptoms, from hives and sneezing in mild cases to death from the explosion of hemoglobin (a blood component)
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Pregnant peanut lovers can celebrate, perhaps with a PB&J snack: A study out Monday shows an association between pregnant women who ate the most peanuts andĀ tree nuts and children with a decreased risk of allergy. Women had been advised to avoid peanuts and tree nuts, as well as other highly allergic foods, during pregnancy and until the child turned 3, as a way to try to reduce the chances of an allergy. But those recommendations were rescinded after researchers found that the effort didn't work.
HEALTH
October 11, 2013 | By Karen Ravn
If your pollen allergies are acting up and getting you down, don't despair. There are steps you can take that can make a real difference. Avoiding pollen altogether is probably impossible (unless you live under a dome, in which case you have plenty of other problems). But there are ways to limit your exposure. Keep your doors and windows closed and run a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. Keep your car windows closed and run the air conditioner. Check the pollen count (one good site is http://www.pollen.com/allergy-forecast.asp )
HEALTH
October 11, 2013 | By Karen Ravn
Fall is in the air and so, alas, are zillions of grains of weed pollen, sailing hither and yon, high and low, far and wide. These guarantee an abundance of new little weeds next year - and an abundance of sniffy, sneezy, wheezy people right now, namely those unfortunate souls who have an allergy to pollen. Pollen allergy is often called "hay fever," although it doesn't cause fever and its only connection with hay is that it inflicts its woes at hay-harvesting time. The name "seasonal allergic rhinitis" - where "rhinitis" refers to an inflamed nose - is more accurate if less evocative.
SCIENCE
September 16, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Children's allergies to peanuts, dairy and other foods cost the U.S. nearly $25 billion a year, according to the first survey to come up with a comprehensive price tag for a condition that affects 8% of American kids. Researchers led by Dr. Ruchi Gupta , a pediatrician at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago and a professor at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, surveyed 1,643 parents around the country who have at least one child with a food allergy.
HEALTH
August 10, 2013 | Emily Dwass
During a recent vacation, we met friends at a neighborhood hangout for dinner. As we walked in, I became worried -- one sniff confirmed that a fish fry was taking place. After informing our server that I'm allergic to fish (also peanuts), she recommended the nachos. When I lifted the first forkful, the chips were sizzling. I asked the server if, by any chance, the chips had been deep-fried in the same oil as the fish? "Oops," she said, and whisked away the plate. Oops, indeed.
HEALTH
June 1, 2013
Who hasn't seen a lost child, with tear-stained cheeks, wandering at an amusement park or airport? Parents might feel less anxious with a product called Safetytat ( www.safetytat.com ), a temporary, stick-on tattoo on which you can write a phone number. They come six to a pack, with a marker (about $10). Or they are sold customized, with warnings about allergies or other information (about $20 for 24). The package suggests that caregivers write a cellphone number on the tattoo and don't include the child's name.
NEWS
January 9, 1987
There is no "controversy over moderate drinking" to a recovering alcoholic or one who lives with such a person. You just can't drink! What's shameful about psychologist Roger Vogler's pitch--it helps sell his book, and with his TV interviews, makes him a personality--is that in using the word moderate, an appeal to a health truth in everything one does, he's snickering at reality. True, there may be some people who can drink in moderation, or even in excess and get drunk, without becoming alcoholic.
NEWS
June 2, 1985 | From Reuters
Muscovites are being plagued by swarms of mosquitoes and are writing thousands of letters to sanitation authorities asking for help and advice, the Soviet government newspaper Izvestia reported. With temperatures in Moscow already in the 80s, the insects are gathering in damp, warm basements, Izvestia said Friday.
SPORTS
May 16, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Josh Hamilton said he was assured by doctors this week that the allergies that lead to occasional sinus and throat discomfort and dizziness were not caused or exacerbated by his heavy cocaine use from 2002-2005. "You have a hallway up the middle of your nose and sinus cavities on each side," said Hamilton, whose addiction to drugs and alcohol led to a ban from baseball from 2003-2005. "When you breathe air, it goes up and down the hallway. "Same thing when you do drugs, it goes up the hallway, not into the sinus cavities.
SPORTS
May 14, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Josh Hamilton said he has changed sinus medication and is scheduled to be tested for allergies, but he wanted to make one thing about his weakened condition perfectly clear. "This has absolutely nothing to do with my .200 batting average," he said. The Angels limited Hamilton to designated hitter Tuesday, one day after the right fielder came out of a game with what Manager Mike Scioscia called dizziness. Hamilton said he has had sinus and throat discomfort for about 10 days and said he hoped a change in medication would help.
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