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BUSINESS
November 11, 2009 | Richard Verrier
Carol Lombardini may have the least glamorous job in Hollywood. As the chief negotiator for the major studios, she must find consensus among a group that often has conflicting interests and priorities. But Lombardini, the new president of the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, has had plenty of time to learn what she's getting into. The 54-year-old former labor attorney has spent most of her career at the alliance, where she worked under her longtime mentor, Nick Counter, who died last week after retiring this year.
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BUSINESS
December 1, 2004 | James Bates
Actors will start negotiating Monday with Hollywood's major entertainment companies on a new three-year TV and film contract. Bargaining issues are expected to include DVD payments and healthcare. Actors are represented by the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, with studios and networks represented by the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers. The current contract expires June 30.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2009 | Richard Verrier
Nick Counter, the long-standing former negotiator for the major studios who squared off against Hollywood's writers during a 100-day strike in 2008, died Friday night. He was 69. The former president of the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers was taken to West Hills Hospital earlier this week after collapsing in his Los Angeles home. His family declined to specify the cause of death. Counter was a fixture in Hollywood labor circles, having overseen some 400 labor contracts with writers, actors, film crews, musicians and scores of other professionals.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2005 | Richard Verrier
The Screen Actors Guild reached a tentative agreement with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers on a three-year contract covering TV animation productions. The agreement includes a 3% increase in minimum pay for workers, effective July 1, and a 1% increase in contributions to the union's benefit plans, beginning Jan. 1. The guild's national board will consider the proposed contract later this month. -- Richard Verrier
BUSINESS
July 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Hollywood's trade group and its labor negotiating executives plan to move their offices in Encino down the street. The Motion Picture Assn. of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers are expected to relocate in November into larger quarters in the Sherman Oaks Galleria. The groups have been in their current building on Ventura Boulevard since 1993.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2001 | James Bates
The Directors Guild of America's board agreed over the weekend to hold talks with studio chiefs to see if the two sides can start negotiations on a contract to replace one expiring June 30. The studios' Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers has asked directors to start early to avoid the kind of production slowdowns that occurred this year stemming from uncertainties over the 11th-hour negotiations involving writers and actors.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Actors Reach Tentative Agreement With Producers: Representatives of the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists reached agreement on a new three-year contract with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers for theatrical and TV movies. Details were not disclosed. The existing contract is scheduled to expire on June 30. Negotiations started on Feb. 7.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2001 | CLAUDIA ELLER
The Writers Guild of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers announced Monday that they will go back to the bargaining table April 17 for one more try at reaching an agreement on a new contract before the current one expires May 2. Talks broke off March 1. Failing to reach a new agreement, the guild, representing some 11,000 TV and movie writers, could vote to strike.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2004 | James Bates
Hollywood writers and studios again adjourned their contract negotiations, and won't meet again until June 1. The Writers Guild of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers let their previous contract lapse May 2. Writers have accused studios of failing to address key issues such as boosting the amount of money writers receive for DVD sales.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2009 | Richard Verrier
Nick Counter, who as chief negotiator for the major studios became the designated nemesis of Hollywood labor, is retiring after more than 25 years on the job. The Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers said Friday that Counter will retire when his five-year contract expires March 31. The move was widely anticipated. In fact, Counter, 68, was expected to retire last summer, but those plans were delayed by the ongoing labor dispute with the Screen Actors Guild.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Verrier is a Times staff writer.
With the collapse of mediation talks between the major Hollywood studios and the Screen Actors Guild, the warring parties wasted little time launching campaigns aimed at discrediting each other while courting the sympathies of actors who will cast ballots in a strike referendum next month.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Verrier is a Times staff writer.
The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees agreed to a tentative three-year contract with the major Hollywood studios Wednesday, becoming the fifth union this year to conclude a deal with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers. The proposed agreement was modeled on similar pacts negotiated by writers, directors and the smaller actors union, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, that established pay terms for programs streamed on the Web.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Verrier is a Times staff writer.
Four days after actors called for bringing in a federal mediator to resolve stalled contract negotiations, the studios finally delivered a response: OK, but don't expect much. The Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, which bargains on behalf of the studios, said in a statement Thursday that "we are, of course, willing to meet with a federal mediator in the hopes of achieving our fifth guild agreement this year."
BUSINESS
July 11, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
The major Hollywood studios called on the Screen Actors Guild on Thursday to put their final contract offer to a membership vote, a proposal the union rejected, continuing the stalemate in negotiations. As expected, the largest actors union did not accept what the studios called their final offer, which they said contained more than $250 million in improvements over the previous three-year contract, which expired June 30.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
Writers Guild of America members overwhelmingly approved a new three-year contract Tuesday, officially ending a labor dispute that resulted in Hollywood's biggest strike in two decades. More than 90% of the 4,060 members who cast ballots in Los Angeles and New York voted in favor of ratifying the contract, a show of support that was widely anticipated after guild leaders touted the pact as a landmark agreement. "This contract is a new beginning for writers in the digital age," said Patric M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1990
Hoping to avert another strike like the one that paralyzed the entertainment industry in 1988, the Writers Guild of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers leadership announced on Wednesday in West Hollywood a tentative plan to extend their contract until 1995. The proposal, which faces a vote of the Writers Guild membership next month, would add three years to the existing contract. It also would provide a mechanism for amending the terms of the agreement each year.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2008 | Claudia Eller and Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writers
The strike is over. Hollywood's costly 100-day walkout came to a widely welcomed end Tuesday after members of the Writers Guild of America voted overwhelmingly to go back to work. More than 90% of the 3,775 writers who cast ballots in Los Angeles and New York voted to immediately end the work stoppage, capping the entertainment industry's most contentious labor dispute in recent history.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2008 | Richard Verrier and Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writers
Hollywood's striking writers, signaling a possible thaw in the 3-month-old labor dispute, have agreed to drop two demands that studios have long viewed as non-starters. Leaders of the Writers Guild of America told top studio chiefs during a meeting Tuesday that they would ditch previous proposals to unionize writers who work on animated movies and reality TV shows.
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