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Allied Pilots Assn

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BUSINESS
August 1, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pilots Union Postpones Contract Offer: The Allied Pilots Assn. will not submit its settlement proposal to AMR Corp. today as scheduled, union President Jim Sovich said in a recorded message to members. The union's latest contract offer has been delayed indefinitely, he said. AMR, based in Ft. Worth, owns 25% of Canadian Airlines International Ltd.'s common stock.
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NATIONAL
November 20, 2010 | By Brian Bennett, Tribune Washington Bureau
After weeks of pressure from pilot unions over controversial new airport screening measures, the Transportation Security Administration agreed Friday to exempt pilots from enhanced pat-downs and full-body scans. Pilots flying for U.S. carriers and traveling in uniform will immediately start going through expedited screening after two forms of their identification are checked against a secure database, TSA Director John Pistole said in a statement. Airline pilots had complained when the agency refused to exempt them from pat-downs, seen as too intrusive, and full-body scans, which union leaders said would put pilots at risk for increased exposure to radiation.
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BUSINESS
March 13, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
AMR Corp.'s American Airlines will resume a new round of negotiations with its pilots union Friday. Allied Pilots Assn. spokesman Wally Pitts said union President James Sovich has notified members of the meeting. . . . Microsoft Corp. said it delayed until the end of the month the release of a test version of its updated Internet browsing software, to check for security flaws.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2010 | By Brian Bennett and Jordan Steffen, Tribune Washington Bureau
The head of the Transportation Security Administration refused to back down from using aggressive pat-downs and full-body scans at airports, telling a Senate committee on Wednesday that the screenings were necessary to protect the nation's fliers. TSA Director John Pistole said the pat-downs, which include searches of passengers' genital areas, and scanners that reveal nude images of their bodies would have found the explosives on an alleged would-be airline bomber last Christmas Day. Umar Abdulmutallab is accused of boarding a flight bound for Detroit with explosives in his underwear that went undetected by metal detectors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1997 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adding fuel to the contentious El Toro airport debate, another airline pilots union has raised concerns about the safety of takeoffs from a runway the county has designated for the majority of departures. The Allied Pilots Assn., representing 9,000 American Airlines pilots, stated its opposition to using the runway in a letter dated Tuesday to Supervisor William G. Steiner, chairman of the County Board of Supervisors.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2010 | By Brian Bennett, Tribune Washington Bureau
After weeks of pressure from pilot unions over controversial new airport screening measures, the Transportation Security Administration agreed Friday to exempt pilots from enhanced pat-downs and full-body scans. Pilots flying for U.S. carriers and traveling in uniform will immediately start going through expedited screening after two forms of their identification are checked against a secure database, TSA Director John Pistole said in a statement. Airline pilots had complained when the agency refused to exempt them from pat-downs, seen as too intrusive, and full-body scans, which union leaders said would put pilots at risk for increased exposure to radiation.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1997 | From Washington Post
American Airlines Chairman Robert Crandall said Wednesday that he does not see how a compromise can be reached on a critical contract issue with the Allied Pilots Assn., which will be free to strike the airline in mid-April at the end of a government-ordered cooling-off period.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1992
The editorial (Oct. 16) regarding the proposed British Airways/USAir deal told only part of the story. Primary to the objections of Delta, United and American Airlines is the lack of quid pro quo, or equal rights, to compete. The editorial suggests that freedom to fly within the United Kingdom might suffice for a fair deal for the U.S. carriers; however, nothing could be further from reality. The U.S. aviation market comprises fully 40% of the world's air traffic. There is no country in the world that can offer a commensurate value for "open skies," let alone the British.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1997 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Airlines' pilots ratified a new contract by a comfortable margin Monday, ending more than two years of heated bargaining that boiled over into a fleeting strike against the nation's second-largest airline. The 9,300 pilots voted 69% in favor of the settlement, which was tentatively approved last month by the directors of their union, the Allied Pilots Assn. "We're very pleased," American President Donald Carty told a news conference.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2010 | By Brian Bennett and Jordan Steffen, Tribune Washington Bureau
The head of the Transportation Security Administration refused to back down from using aggressive pat-downs and full-body scans at airports, telling a Senate committee on Wednesday that the screenings were necessary to protect the nation's fliers. TSA Director John Pistole said the pat-downs, which include searches of passengers' genital areas, and scanners that reveal nude images of their bodies would have found the explosives on an alleged would-be airline bomber last Christmas Day. Umar Abdulmutallab is accused of boarding a flight bound for Detroit with explosives in his underwear that went undetected by metal detectors.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2010 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Although Americans plan to travel for leisure a bit more next year than this year, vacationers may have a hard time leaving work behind. In 2011, Americans will travel more often and spend more but will also stay connected with work more than ever, thanks to advances in mobile phones and the Internet, according to a survey of more than 3,000 U.S. travelers. In the survey by the travel website TripAdvisor, nearly 80% of respondents said they planned to spend more or about the same for travel in 2011 than in 2010.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2000
* The leaders of the pilots union at AMR Corp.'s American Airlines said they will resign, a month after members rejected a contract extension that would have forgiven a $45.5-million judgment against the union. President Rich LaVoy, Vice President Brian Mayhew and Secretary-Treasurer Bob Morgan said they would resign once interim officers are appointed, the Allied Pilots Assn. said on its Web site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1997 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adding fuel to the contentious El Toro airport debate, another airline pilots union has raised concerns about the safety of takeoffs from a runway the county has designated for the majority of departures. The Allied Pilots Assn., representing 9,000 American Airlines pilots, stated its opposition to using the runway in a letter dated Tuesday to Supervisor William G. Steiner, chairman of the County Board of Supervisors.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1997 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Airlines' pilots ratified a new contract by a comfortable margin Monday, ending more than two years of heated bargaining that boiled over into a fleeting strike against the nation's second-largest airline. The 9,300 pilots voted 69% in favor of the settlement, which was tentatively approved last month by the directors of their union, the Allied Pilots Assn. "We're very pleased," American President Donald Carty told a news conference.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1997 | From Washington Post
American Airlines Chairman Robert Crandall said Wednesday that he does not see how a compromise can be reached on a critical contract issue with the Allied Pilots Assn., which will be free to strike the airline in mid-April at the end of a government-ordered cooling-off period.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pilots Union Postpones Contract Offer: The Allied Pilots Assn. will not submit its settlement proposal to AMR Corp. today as scheduled, union President Jim Sovich said in a recorded message to members. The union's latest contract offer has been delayed indefinitely, he said. AMR, based in Ft. Worth, owns 25% of Canadian Airlines International Ltd.'s common stock.
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