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NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
A small and ailing alligator was found and rescued Friday at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, according to various reports out Monday. And to think, most of us don't attempt to get a soda through security. The most comforting quote to come out of the situation (emphasis ours): "Some human being physically carried it there and put it there. It's not big enough to operate automatic doors . " Well, thank goodness for small favors. That observation came from a Chicago Herpetological Society spokesman, speaking with the Chicago Tribune . The 3-year-old gator, approximately 2 feet long, was spotted under an escalator by a passenger, then broom-scooted into a box and placed in the care of the society, the paper said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
Since his star-making turn nearly two decades ago as the mentally challenged Karl Childers in "Sling Blade," Billy Bob Thornton has been known for what may best be described as playing expressive eccentrics. There was a bad Santa, an astronaut farmer and a taciturn barber so lacking in human connection that the movie about him was titled "The Man Who Wasn't There. " In FX's highly touted new series "Fargo," Thornton adds to that oddball gallery when he plays a drifter named Lorne Malvo.
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NATIONAL
July 10, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
An alligator attacked 17-year-old Kaleb Langdale on Monday, severing his right arm below the elbow, but it didn't take the Florida teenager's sense of humor.  Friends say he was happy the gator got his right arm -- not his left -- because he uses his left arm to steer his airboat. The alligator attacked the teenager after the youth dove into a gator-filled river to cool off on a sweltering summer day. The teen's arm was found inside the 11-foot reptile when it was hunted down and killed Monday evening, according to Fort Myers television station WBBH.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By David Fleshler
BOCA RATON, Fla. - Paddling down the Intracoastal Waterway in southern Florida, Russell Fields noticed what appeared to be a large palm leaf floating near shore. The leaf began moving toward him. A few feet from his paddleboard, a reptilian head filled with teeth emerged from the water. Fields slapped the water with his paddle, and the head stayed there for a moment and then submerged. Fields' encounter with a 10-foot American crocodile in Boca Raton has become a more common experience in Broward and Palm Beach counties, as these light gray cousins of alligators reclaim their historic range.
NATIONAL
June 14, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
A Florida tour boat captain suspected of illegally feeding alligators may already have suffered the ultimate punishment: An alligator bit off his hand. Animal rights activists on Thursday denounced the decision to kill the alligator in a bid to recover the man's hand. They said the captain, who is now under investigation for feeding the animals, is to blame for teaching the fearsome creature that people = food. Wallace Weatherholt, 63, who works for Captain Doug's Everglades Tours, was taking six tourists out on the water Tuesday when he paused to give them a thrill -- and a photo op, according to WBBH of Fort Myers, Fla. He began slapping the water to attract alligators, using marshmallows as bait.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1995
"Travels With Big Al" (Aug. 27): That's what your headline said, and of course I expected an amusing story to go with it. There was nothing amusing in the story about the 1,100-pound alligator appearing in a tank under a trailer that travels from carnival to carnival. People pay 50 cents to look at him. And what do they see? A creature spending its life imprisoned in solitary confinement for no crime other than being an alligator. What do children learn when they see this?
NATIONAL
May 29, 2010 | By David Fleshler, Sun Sentinel
Florida investigators used DNA analysis of alligator blood to arrest a Pompano Beach man on charges of alligator poaching. Mark M. Montgomery Jr., 22, was charged Thursday with illegally killing an American alligator, a felony. Alligator poaching is an old, if not particularly proud, South Florida tradition, but the use of high-tech forensics to catch the poachers is not. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission began investigating in October after receiving a complaint from a man who said he saw another man kill an alligator in what appeared to be a flagrantly illegal manner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2011 | By Robert J. Lopez, Los Angeles Times
State narcotics agents raiding a Hemet pot house made a surprising find amid dozens of plants and seedlings: a 50-pound alligator. The 4-foot-long gator lived inside the home, and the owner had set up a concrete tub with water so the reptile could get wet. "He wasn't aggressive at all.... This guy was just very, very mellow," said Joel Almquist, who was summoned by authorities Monday night to take the alligator to his San Bernardino County animal sanctuary. He said he had to "kind of push the plants to the side" to reach the gator and tape its mouth closed.
NEWS
May 17, 1989 | From United Press International
A 10-foot alligator resisted the efforts of an impatient driver to move it off the road, taking bites out of a front tire and bumper of the man's 1988 Pontiac Grand Am. Johnny Collins, 18, was driving on Highway 146 over the weekend when he spotted the alligator. He stopped about four feet from the animal and began blowing his car horn. But, instead of crawling away, the alligator bit down on Collins' front tire until it exploded and then bit a chunk out of his plastic bumper, officials said.
WORLD
April 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A 4-year-old alligator named Mr. Cranky Pants was stolen from a reptile park north of Sydney, but officials at the zoo said the thieves may have underestimated his moodiness and let him go. The animal later was recovered in a nearby creek. Officials at the Australian Reptile Park in Somersby said the thieves scaled two barbed-wire fences and climbed into an alligator pit before stealing the 4-foot beast, according to Australian Broadcasting Corp. radio. It was the third alligator stolen from the park in two years.
SCIENCE
January 16, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Alligators do their best hunting in the early morning hours, say scientists who tramped out into muddy Florida wetlands and strapped cameras onto the giant reptiles' backs. The findings, published in the journal PLOS One, reveals once-obscure aspects of the lives of the animals by taking the alligator's-eye view. Alligators and crocodiles, known together as crocodilians, are found throughout the southeastern United States. Scientists have studied their hunting and eating habits for years (a recent study even found that these cunning predators may actually use sticks to lure birds to their doom )
NATIONAL
January 4, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Forget the chicken dinner, the rubbery staple of the political fundraising circuit. Go alligator hunting with Sen. David Vitter (R-La.) on a Louisiana Bayou Weekend for a campaign donation of $5,000. Or spend a weekend in Hayward, Wis., for the Lumberjack World Championships, featuring hometown Republican congressman and former lumberjack champion Sean P. Duffy, for a donation of $1,000 per person or $2,000 per political action committee. Or join Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Downey)
SCIENCE
December 6, 2013 | By Amina Khan
As if crocodiles and alligators weren't terrifying enough, scientists have discovered that these ancient, sharp-toothed beasts are incredibly cunning. So clever that they use lures to trap and gobble unsuspecting birds. The discovery in two crocodilian species - mugger crocodiles and American alligators - is the first report of tool use in reptiles, according to a study in the journal Ethology Ecology and Evolution. Some birds, like egrets, actually choose to nest around crocodile and alligator hangouts because they offer some protection from tree-climbing predators like raccoons, snakes and monkeys.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
There's a new clue in the mystery of how a 2-foot-long alligator came to be abandoned at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport. Earlier, social media had pointed to a tattooed man . Now, it's a woman in a dark beanie being sought to find out how the gator wound up on the cold floor beneath an elevator at the Midwestern airport Nov. 1. Surveillance photos show the woman holding the reptile while aboard a train headed for O'Hare. She showed it to passengers before leaving the train at the airport station, according to the Chicago Transit Authority.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
A small and ailing alligator was found and rescued Friday at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, according to various reports out Monday. And to think, most of us don't attempt to get a soda through security. The most comforting quote to come out of the situation (emphasis ours): "Some human being physically carried it there and put it there. It's not big enough to operate automatic doors . " Well, thank goodness for small favors. That observation came from a Chicago Herpetological Society spokesman, speaking with the Chicago Tribune . The 3-year-old gator, approximately 2 feet long, was spotted under an escalator by a passenger, then broom-scooted into a box and placed in the care of the society, the paper said.
NEWS
October 1, 2013 | By Ingrid Schmidt
The limited-edition Coach + Billy Reid collaborative collection launched Tuesday, starring  the most expensive bag that Coach has ever created: the $20,000 Warrior tote, crafted of Louisiana alligator in an ode to Reid's Southern roots.   Reid , who hails from Alabama, received the Council of Fashion Designers of America's 2012 Menswear Designer of the Year Award. He is known for his deft tailoring and a look that reflects the relaxed sophistication of his Southern heritage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2008 | Francisco Vara-Orta
Animal control officers from the city Department of Animal Services went to a North Hollywood residence this week and found an adult 5-foot, 6-inch-long male alligator named Ziggy. The owner, whose name was not released, surrendered the alligator without incident. Animal Services had gone to the residence because of a referral call from the Los Angeles Police Department. "The alligator appears to be in good health, thankfully," said Kathy Davis, assistant general manager of Animal Services.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Officials said an alligator bit off part of a golfer's arm as the man leaned over to pick up a ball at a private course. The man, who is in his 70s, was retrieving a ball from a pond when the 10-foot alligator bit him at Ocean Creek Golf Course in Myrtle Beach. The gator pulled the golfer into the pond and ripped off his arm in the struggle. The golfer's partners were able to free him. Wildlife workers killed the alligator and retrieved the arm in hopes that it might be reattached.
IMAGE
September 1, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Hermès reopens on Rodeo Drive this week with a new three-story boutique framed in a bright white marble grid facade and a limited-edition collection of items made just for the occasion, including a wine trunk, a basketball, swimming pool-inspired silk scarves and this alligator-and-diamond Collier de Chien cuff bracelet in turquoise blue. Founded in Paris in 1837 as a maker of leather horse harnesses, Hermès has evolved into a luxury brand known for silk scarves and ties, tabletop items, jewelry and watches, ready-to-wear clothing and, of course, status handbags.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2013 | By Kate Mather
Antelope Valley residents complain of dogs dumped in their desert towns , but it was a sighting of a more exotic animal that raised eyebrows this week. Deputies at the L.A. County sheriff's Lancaster station received a report Tuesday of two women, one holding a 4-foot-long alligator, who were standing outside a van parked near the corner of 50th Street West and Avenue K. "The caller feared the female was about to abandon the beast in the desert," the Sheriff's Department said in a statement.
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