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Allison Pearson

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November 6, 2002 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
"Women used to have time to make mince pies and had to fake orgasms," thinks Kate Reddy, harried working mother in Allison Pearson's new novel, "I Don't Know How She Does It," at the bleary hour of 1:37 a.m., fresh off a plane and trying to crumble the crust of two store-bought pies so they look homemade for her daughter's Christmas pageant. "Now we can manage the orgasms, but we have to fake the mince pies."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik and John Horn, Los Angeles Times
As Carrie Bradshaw in HBO's "Sex and the City" and its two spinoff movies, Sarah Jessica Parker faced the kind of choices that chic, independent women envied: Manolo Blahniks or Jimmy Choos, orgasmic one-night stand or cosmopolitans with the girls? Playing Kate Reddy in "I Don't Know How She Does It," Parker faces questions just a bit more prosaic and true to real life: Can I make breakfast for my two kids, and somehow avoid wearing the leftover batter to work? In Friday's movie, adapted by Aline Brosh McKenna from Allison Pearson's bestselling novel, Reddy is a Boston investment manager trying to balance a taxing, alpha-male-dominated vocation with the demands of marriage, all while parenting a petulant 5-year-old daughter and an incommunicative 1-year-old son. As any working mom can testify, it's as perilous as going over Niagara Falls without a barrel, and Reddy faces one more profound problem — the advances of handsome colleague Jack Abelhammer (Pierce Brosnan)
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik and John Horn, Los Angeles Times
As Carrie Bradshaw in HBO's "Sex and the City" and its two spinoff movies, Sarah Jessica Parker faced the kind of choices that chic, independent women envied: Manolo Blahniks or Jimmy Choos, orgasmic one-night stand or cosmopolitans with the girls? Playing Kate Reddy in "I Don't Know How She Does It," Parker faces questions just a bit more prosaic and true to real life: Can I make breakfast for my two kids, and somehow avoid wearing the leftover batter to work? In Friday's movie, adapted by Aline Brosh McKenna from Allison Pearson's bestselling novel, Reddy is a Boston investment manager trying to balance a taxing, alpha-male-dominated vocation with the demands of marriage, all while parenting a petulant 5-year-old daughter and an incommunicative 1-year-old son. As any working mom can testify, it's as perilous as going over Niagara Falls without a barrel, and Reddy faces one more profound problem — the advances of handsome colleague Jack Abelhammer (Pierce Brosnan)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Poor little Petra, just 13 and growing up in South Wales, is one of thousands of girls smitten with David Cassidy. The year is 1974, and Cassidy is the creation of a brilliant marketing campaign that preys on the hearts of teenage girls. As you may or may not remember, depending on which planet you were born on, Cassidy was the star of the TV series "The Partridge Family. " He branched off into his own career as a bubble-gum rock icon. Cassidy's career fizzled and died in a series of media scandals, including a spread of him naked in Rolling Stone (photographed by Annie Leibovitz)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Poor little Petra, just 13 and growing up in South Wales, is one of thousands of girls smitten with David Cassidy. The year is 1974, and Cassidy is the creation of a brilliant marketing campaign that preys on the hearts of teenage girls. As you may or may not remember, depending on which planet you were born on, Cassidy was the star of the TV series "The Partridge Family. " He branched off into his own career as a bubble-gum rock icon. Cassidy's career fizzled and died in a series of media scandals, including a spread of him naked in Rolling Stone (photographed by Annie Leibovitz)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2002 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
Kate Reddy is a high-powered London hedge fund manager, a go-getter from the get-go, traveling for business -- New York today, Germany tomorrow -- working every vacation, as well as most evenings and weekends. Kate is also the mother of two small children, and therein lies the rub.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2011
I Think I Love You Allison Pearson Alfred A. Knopf: 357 pp., $24.95
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2011 | By Michael Phillips, Tribune Newspapers
Thwarted by the same awkward timing that zonked "Confessions of a Shopaholic" two years ago, just when shopaholics began to seem extra-heinous, the film version of "I Don't Know How She Does It" doesn't know how to do what I think it's trying to do. I think it's trying to acknowledge the real-world pressures faced by many, many millions of women. The movie concerns three especially chaotic months in the life of Kate Reddy, an investment firm wiz played by Sarah Jessica Parker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1993 | MARTIN MILLER
It almost like "Jurassic Park," but it was a lot less frightening. And for the 22 children ages 3 to 7, whose parents said they were too young to see the blockbuster summer movie, attending a recent dinosaur workshop at Cypress College supplied just enough excitement. " Tyrannosaurus rex is my favorite," said Sarang Ratanjee, 6, of Anaheim, who held a replica of the 50-foot-tall, flesh-eating beast's jaw over his head. "I like them because they eat the other dinosaurs."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2012 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Contagion Warner Bros., $28.98; Blu-ray, $35.99 Director Steven Soderbergh and screenwriter Scott Z. Burns take a novel approach to the medical-crisis thriller, mixing a spooky post-apocalyptic look with flat docu-realism. The film falls halfway between "Dawn of the Dead" and the old TV series "Emergency," with more than a little "Towering Inferno" thrown in — what with an all-star cast that includes Matt Damon, Gwyneth Paltrow, Kate Winslet and Jude Law. Soderbergh and Burns relay in chilling detail how a deadly epidemic could spread across the world within weeks, then speculate on how society might change in its wake, as medical professionals race to find a vaccine.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2002 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
"Women used to have time to make mince pies and had to fake orgasms," thinks Kate Reddy, harried working mother in Allison Pearson's new novel, "I Don't Know How She Does It," at the bleary hour of 1:37 a.m., fresh off a plane and trying to crumble the crust of two store-bought pies so they look homemade for her daughter's Christmas pageant. "Now we can manage the orgasms, but we have to fake the mince pies."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2002 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
Kate Reddy is a high-powered London hedge fund manager, a go-getter from the get-go, traveling for business -- New York today, Germany tomorrow -- working every vacation, as well as most evenings and weekends. Kate is also the mother of two small children, and therein lies the rub.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2005 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
As France's ambassador for international investment, Clara Gaymard jets around the world at least two weeks of every month, on a mission to convince CEOs that transplanting their businesses to her country would benefit their bottom lines. A wife, mother of eight, high-profile careerist and bestselling author, with another novel in progress, she somehow finds the time and energy to roller-skate, swim and ski with her husband and her children, who range in age from 7 to almost 18.
BOOKS
December 15, 2002
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction LAST WEEK WEEKS ON LIST *--* *--* 1 Prey by Michael Crichton (HarperCollins: $26.95) A foray 11 2 into the chilling world of nanotechnology as a programmer frantically tries to stop a destructive swarm of tiny machines 2 The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold (Little, Brown: $21.95) 1 24 A murdered girl tells the story of her grieving family still learning to cope, the killer and the detective who hunts him 3 Four Blind Mice by James Patterson (Little, Brown: 2 2 $27.
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