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Alma Reaves Woods

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June 26, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Evoking exuberant applause and a couple of heartfelt "amens" from the audience, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday named the new Watts branch library after a local volunteer, making an exception to a city policy that reserves that honor for donors of $1 million or more.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1996
At 3 a.m. I went outside to cool off. Above me was a single brilliant shining star in an otherwise empty and murky sky. It made me think of Alma Reaves Woods lighting the path, leading thousands of children out of the dark haze of ignorance and hopelessness. It is only right that 40 years of dedication be rewarded by naming the Watts branch library after her (June 26). It was her foresight and vision to give children the knowledge and tools to escape into a brighter future. Alma Woods will always be the heart and soul of that splendid symbol of hope.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1996
At 3 a.m. I went outside to cool off. Above me was a single brilliant shining star in an otherwise empty and murky sky. It made me think of Alma Reaves Woods lighting the path, leading thousands of children out of the dark haze of ignorance and hopelessness. It is only right that 40 years of dedication be rewarded by naming the Watts branch library after her (June 26). It was her foresight and vision to give children the knowledge and tools to escape into a brighter future. Alma Woods will always be the heart and soul of that splendid symbol of hope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dedication of a building became a celebration of community activism Saturday as ribbons were cut at the Alma Reaves Woods--Watts Branch Library, named for a local volunteer after scores of residents protested a city policy reserving such honors for donors of $1 million or more. "As we open up the flagship, the crown jewel, of the libraries of Los Angeles, it was only appropriate that we name it after the crown jewel of our community," Councilman Rudy Svorinich Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dedication of a building became a celebration of community activism Saturday as ribbons were cut at the Alma Reaves Woods--Watts Branch Library, named for a local volunteer after scores of residents protested a city policy reserving such honors for donors of $1 million or more. "As we open up the flagship, the crown jewel, of the libraries of Los Angeles, it was only appropriate that we name it after the crown jewel of our community," Councilman Rudy Svorinich Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1991 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took a fiery insurrection, three decades of attending government meetings and countless hours of canvassing the streets and housing projects of Watts for Alma Reaves Woods' dream to come true. Now, thanks to her efforts and those of a handful of activists, a state-of-the-art library will soon be built at Compton Avenue and 102nd Street, bringing the power of books and language to the impoverished, racially mixed community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1998
Public meetings on Los Angeles City Charter reform will be held today and next week. Today, the Los Angeles Elected Charter Reform Commission Committee on a More Responsive City Government With an Involved Citizenry will hold a hearing on proposed changes in City Council districts' number, size and boundaries, and hear testimony from experts on the timing of municipal elections to increase voter turnout. The hearing will be from 10 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1996
It required a national ruckus, but the Los Angeles City Council today may finally bestow a well-deserved honor on a Watts woman. Councilman Rudy Svorinich Jr. will present a council motion to name the brand-new Watts library branch after Alma Reaves Woods, 71. Woods dedicated 40 years to promoting reading and the importance of the written word. She knocked on doors to beg for a bond issue for a new library. She raised money, dollar by dollar. She lugged books to pass out at housing projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved a $1.5-million proposal to triple the size of the Watts library--a move that community activists say will bring much-needed educational resources to one of the city's poorest neighborhoods. The council's unanimous vote came after years of perseverance by the Friends of the Watts Library to establish a significant learning resource center in a neighborhood where many adults are deficient in reading skills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 500 outraged people from Los Angeles and throughout the country flooded the mayor's office with phone calls Monday complaining about the city's policy of naming libraries only after donors of $1 million, while a City Council member plotted to yank jurisdiction away from the Library Commission to name the new Watts branch after a local activist. The head of the Library Commission also announced Monday that her board plans to drop the donor policy. Councilman Rudy Svorinich Jr.
NEWS
June 26, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Evoking exuberant applause and a couple of heartfelt "amens" from the audience, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday named the new Watts branch library after a local volunteer, making an exception to a city policy that reserves that honor for donors of $1 million or more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1991 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took a fiery insurrection, three decades of attending government meetings and countless hours of canvassing the streets and housing projects of Watts for Alma Reaves Woods' dream to come true. Now, thanks to her efforts and those of a handful of activists, a state-of-the-art library will soon be built at Compton Avenue and 102nd Street, bringing the power of books and language to the impoverished, racially mixed community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1996 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Library Commission on Monday changed its naming policy to delete a controversial provision that reserved the honor for million-dollar donors. From now on, the tribute will be offered instead to historical heroes or community leaders. The old policy gained national attention in June over a commission decision not to name the Watts library branch for Alma Reaves Woods, a volunteer who has devoted four decades to promoting literacy in her community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1998 | LAURIE MacGILLIVRAY, Laurie MacGillivray is an assistant professor at USC's Rossier School of Education and a principal investigator with the Center for the Improvement of Early Reading Achievement
Learning to read is a complex process. As parents, it is difficult to know which behaviors to encourage. One of the most common questions parents have is whether a child can read a book too often. Once a child has memorized a book, is it OK for them to keep reading it? Are they still learning anything? A book cannot be read too often. When children reread a book, or ask to hear it aloud, they are developing their reading.
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