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NEWS
November 22, 1995 | LEO W. BANKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Head doesn't look like a weather wizard, a seer of sun and storms. He has never gazed into a crystal ball, except for a tongue-in-cheek magazine photograph. But this unassuming 76-year-old has millions of devoted followers, some of whom plan the most intimate events of their lives around the predictions he makes in the Old Farmer's Almanac. One devotee recently asked how the weather would be on her wedding day, nearly six months off. He told her to expect showers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Putting authors on currency is not a new thing. Benjamin Franklin, a founding father and author of “Poor Richard's Almanac,” is on the U.S. $100 bill, and in Chile the Nobel laureate and poet Gabriela Mistral graces the 5,000 peso bill, which is worth about $10. And Jane Austen will soon grace Britain's 10-pound note . But honoring a living writer on a bill or coin is relatively rare. Alice Munro, 82, who last year won the Nobel Prize for Literature, was actually at the ceremony on Monday in Victoria, Canada, (where she once owned a bookstore)
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NEWS
February 28, 1985 | Associated Press
The mayor of Yuba City--until now best known for its almond groves and Juan Corona's mass murder of 25 farm workers in 1971--says he is outraged by the "worst" rating given his city by a New York-published almanac. Rand McNally's new Places Rated Almanac gave the quality of life in the Yuba City area, including Sutter County and neighboring Marysville and Yuba County, the 329th position among 329 metropolitan areas in the United States with more than 100,000 population. Pittsburgh, Pa., was No.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - Karyn Anastasio would have preferred staying in bed, ignoring the early onset of cold and darkness as she huddled in her apartment and watched TV. Instead, Anastasio and her friend, Christina Kaelberer, who also dreads winter, were walking through the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and listening to a tiny woman rave about the surroundings and emphasize how lovely they would be when ice covered the ponds, when white coated the ground, when the...
NEWS
June 1, 2004
The Outdoors section is a wonderful addition to The Times! It has a great mix of sports and hobbies that are interesting to read about. Also, "The Almanac" and "Conditions" are a great public service. Thank you! Anke Raue Rancho Palos Verdes
NEWS
February 28, 1985 | United Press International
Pittsburgh has replaced Atlanta as the best American city to live in, according to the second edition of the Rand McNally "Places Rated Almanac" released Wednesday. The worst cities are Yuba City, Calif., and Pine Bluff, Ark., the map firm said. Rand McNally rated the areas by climate and terrain, housing, health care, transportation, education, the arts, recreation and economic outlook. The rest of the top 10 cities are Boston; Raleigh-Durham, N.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2008 | Carolyn Kellogg
EVER wonder who's sitting behind, say, Virginia Sen. John Warner during a Senate hearing? Well, it's obviously Aide 151. That mysterious, behind-the-scenes assistant is the kind of person who might be profiled in "The Almanac of the Unelected"; the 2008 edition, published in June, is a 760-page tome that shines a light on who does what in Washington. The book profiles more than 600 senior congressional committee staff members, looking at previous positions and publications, providing contact information and even photographs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1992
While we were glad to have Tony Perry feature the latest updates to the Almanac of the Federal Judiciary in his "San Diego at Large" column (Aug. 16), we were disturbed that he distorted our findings. It is clear that he chose the most sensationalistic quotes without giving the public an overall picture of the lawyers' comments about the judges mentioned. For example, there is a quote concerning Judge William B. Enright stating that "he's vicious, he's mean-spirited, he's cruel, and he thinks he's none of these things."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1986 | Brenda Day
After 64 years, murdered film director William Desmond Taylor (the case was written up in last week's Calendar) is very much alive--in development deals. Author Sidney Kirkpatrick said Paramount has taken a six-figure option on his book about the unsolved murder, "A Cast of Killers," with Robert Towne and Kirkpatrick scripting. (As a neat irony, the book suggests that Paramount was involved in a cover-up after the murder.
NATIONAL
December 17, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
NEW YORK -- The groundhog may not make his prediction until February, but Karen Gregorski thinks she already knows how the coming winter is going to turn out: very, very snowy. Gregorski, 66, was walking carefully Tuesday down a midtown Manhattan street, her fur jacket coated with snow. Nearby, doormen shoveled sidewalks, and an apartment superintendent, with a hint of weariness, sprinkled salt on some slippery spots. This was the fourth snow shower in 10 days, and it's not even technically winter yet. “I'm originally from Pennsylvania, and we always went by the Farmer's Almanac,” Gregorski said.
NATIONAL
December 17, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
NEW YORK -- The groundhog may not make his prediction until February, but Karen Gregorski thinks she already knows how the coming winter is going to turn out: very, very snowy. Gregorski, 66, was walking carefully Tuesday down a midtown Manhattan street, her fur jacket coated with snow. Nearby, doormen shoveled sidewalks, and an apartment superintendent, with a hint of weariness, sprinkled salt on some slippery spots. This was the fourth snow shower in 10 days, and it's not even technically winter yet. “I'm originally from Pennsylvania, and we always went by the Farmer's Almanac,” Gregorski said.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
People worried about the high cost of keeping warm this winter will draw little comfort from the Farmer's Almanac, which predicts below-average temperatures for most of the U.S. "Numb's the word," says the 192-year-old publication, which claims an accuracy rate of 80% to 85% for its forecasts, which are prepared two years in advance. The almanac's 2009 edition, on sale Tuesday, says at least two-thirds of the country can expect colder-than-average temperatures this winter, with only the far West and Southeast in line for near-normal readings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2008 | Carolyn Kellogg
EVER wonder who's sitting behind, say, Virginia Sen. John Warner during a Senate hearing? Well, it's obviously Aide 151. That mysterious, behind-the-scenes assistant is the kind of person who might be profiled in "The Almanac of the Unelected"; the 2008 edition, published in June, is a 760-page tome that shines a light on who does what in Washington. The book profiles more than 600 senior congressional committee staff members, looking at previous positions and publications, providing contact information and even photographs.
NEWS
August 17, 2004 | Susan Dworski
Ursus arctos horribilis, the great brown grizzly, may be the most feared and revered American carnivore. A symbol of untamed wilderness, grizzlies are the ultimate horror lurking around every bend on a backpacker's trail. Worshipped by Native Americans, reviled by pioneers and exterminated by game hunters and ranchers, grizzlies have dwindled to near extinction. Busch's almanac packs fascinating details about grizzly biology and history.
NEWS
June 1, 2004
The Outdoors section is a wonderful addition to The Times! It has a great mix of sports and hobbies that are interesting to read about. Also, "The Almanac" and "Conditions" are a great public service. Thank you! Anke Raue Rancho Palos Verdes
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2004 | Steve Harvey
In the local honors category, Allan Wallach of West L.A. points out that the "Famous Californians" list in the World Almanac contains former governors, U.S. senators, presidents -- and one former White House intern (see accompanying). "Now I realize she gets her name in the papers once in a while," Wallach said, "and she's mentioned on Leno and Letterman, but 'famous?' " Infamous in canine circles: Pamela Bond of Santa Barbara came upon a notice for a real scaredy-cat (see accompanying).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Putting authors on currency is not a new thing. Benjamin Franklin, a founding father and author of “Poor Richard's Almanac,” is on the U.S. $100 bill, and in Chile the Nobel laureate and poet Gabriela Mistral graces the 5,000 peso bill, which is worth about $10. And Jane Austen will soon grace Britain's 10-pound note . But honoring a living writer on a bill or coin is relatively rare. Alice Munro, 82, who last year won the Nobel Prize for Literature, was actually at the ceremony on Monday in Victoria, Canada, (where she once owned a bookstore)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1987 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Norma Jean Mortenson Baker Dougherty, who became Marilyn Monroe, would have been 61 on Monday, June 1. On Aug. 5, she will have been dead 25 years. That long; a small wince is allowed. For those who are now in their 40s and beyond, Marilyn's death was one of those news events about which you can remember how you heard it, where you heard it and how you felt.
OPINION
January 2, 2004
Re "Almanacs Put on FBI Watch List," Dec. 30: The latest public pronouncement from the Bush security team about the alleged danger of folks carrying almanacs is something straight out of a Rod Serling teleplay. Can you imagine being pulled over on a routine traffic stop on Wilshire Boulevard with the police officer radioing in that "we've got a suspicious driver with an almanac on his front seat." What next? U.S. citizens armed with National Geographic? Message to those in power: Stop scaring the American people with all these self-serving public pronouncements and instead pass on solid leads to appropriate law enforcement in apprehending terrorists who mean to do us real harm.
NATIONAL
December 30, 2003 | From Associated Press
The FBI is warning police nationwide to be alert for people carrying almanacs, cautioning that the popular reference books covering everything from abbreviations to weather trends could be used for terrorist planning. In a bulletin sent Christmas Eve to about 18,000 police organizations, the FBI said terrorists may use almanacs "to assist with target selection and pre-operational planning." It urged officers to watch during searches, traffic stops and other investigations for anyone carrying almanacs, especially if the books are annotated in suspicious ways.
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