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Aloe

BUSINESS
June 1, 1993 | MICHELE LINGRE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leo and Vladimir Weinstein never thought they could turn rain into gold. But the two brothers did. In 1972 Vladimir ran a small herb shop in Venice and was studying ancient medical treatments from a Chinese master who asked his apprentices to formulate various ointments and shampoos. So Vladimir collected some rainwater, figuring there was nothing softer than rain, and using that he heated up some ingredients on a small stove in the garage attached to his shop.
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HEALTH
May 26, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Parents may be relying on home remedies and herbal treatments more than doctors suspect. In the first study to examine parents' familiarity with herbal effects and interactions, Emory University researchers surveyed families in an Atlanta emergency room for three months. They found that nearly half of the 142 families surveyed had given a child at least one herbal product during the last year and 27% had given three or more.
OPINION
July 28, 2002
Re "Helping to Shut Illegal Clinics," July 21: I'm all in favor of shutting down bad clinics, but sometimes the FDA is wrong. I personally know of someone who was given up for dead after chemotherapy failed to work, then went to using alternative medicine and the cancer went away. This person went to an underground Chinese medicine cure that is an example of what the FDA commonly tries to shut down. For another example, read what happened in Florida. The problem started when an oncologist complained to the FDA that some people were using an unapproved cancer drug, aloe extract, instead of the chemotherapy.
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | NANCY SHULINS, Associated Press
Maranda Francisco stands at the center of a crowded conference room. All eyes and all cameras are on the fidgety 6-year-old, from the tips of her light-brown curls to the toes of her new party shoes. For a few self-conscious seconds, she stares back. Then, with a throat-clearing giggle, on a single intake of breath: "Humpty-Dumpty-sat-on-a-wall," she whispers. "Humpty-Dumpty-had-a-great-fall."
HEALTH
March 31, 2012 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's cooking class this week at Try This - for skin cream. If mixing your own cosmetics sounds like fun, here's a recipe we think is worth the effort. The concoction comes courtesy of Rosemary Gladstar, a Vermont-based herbalist and author of "Science and Art of Herbalism" and numerous other titles. "It turns out a really fluffy, beautiful white cream like what you would buy in any fancy cosmetic store," she says. The all-natural moisturizer calls for ingredients that can be found at health food stores or online at places such as Mountain Rose Herbs (www.mountainroseherbs.com)
NEWS
July 15, 1988 | Clipboard researched by Henry Rivero and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times,Page designed by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Orange County is home to a long list of common house and garden plants that are toxic. Contact with these plants may cause anything from a simple rash to a more serious problem. For example, some may cause breathing difficulties if they are chewed or swallowed. Today, Clipboard begins a series spotlighting these plants.
IMAGE
April 18, 2010 | By Max Padilla, Special to the Los Angeles Times
You won't hear "lather, rinse, repeat" at Chaz Dean Studio salon. You'd be hard-pressed to find a lathering shampoo anywhere on the premises. Instead Dean's salon stocks Wen, its own cleansing conditioner, formulated from natural ingredients such as rosemary, apples, pears, aloe vera and menthol with no harsh detergents. As a hairstylist and colorist for 25 years, Dean discovered that his clients who used traditional shampoos experienced problems with dry hair, hair loss, irritated scalp and, of course, fading hair color.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
For the first time, someone who knew this product first cheek is old enough to be president. Disposable diapers are 35 years old, but the pulpy pads of the past have been superseded by diapers that breathe, don't leak or smell and absorb more. Now, thanks to Houston-based Drypers Corp.'s latest addition of aloe vera, they can soothe babies' bottoms. The No. 3 branded diaper has survived by coming up with product differences.
HOME & GARDEN
October 7, 2000 | U.C. MASTER GARDENERS
Question: What plants do well along the coast? S.T., Huntington Beach Answer: Gardening along the coast has its special challenges, including salt spray and windy conditions. Salt is extremely corrosive and many plants won't tolerate the salt air, which results in salt burn. Burned leaf tips are an indication of too much salt. There are plants, however, that tolerate very salty air such as the aptly named saltbush (Atriplex).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2001
With a goal to spruce up the scenery for drivers coming and going on San Fernando Valley freeways, part of the Valley Gateways Project was unveiled Friday at the Roscoe Boulevard on- and offramps of the San Diego Freeway. Assembly Speaker Robert Hertzberg (D-Van Nuys) and the Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley have teamed up for the $250,000 beautification project that will landscape major freeway on- and offramps in the area.
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