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Alphabet Soup

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OPINION
December 3, 2006 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Cartoonists spilled ink, commentators spilled their guts, and soldiers and civilians spilled blood ... just another week of the "C-word," to use M.E. Cohen's PC shorthand for civil war. Those who consider the Iraq conflict worthy of the C-word were condemned, contradicted, castigated and urged to keep a civil tongue by the WWW (West Wing of the White House), which clung to W-words -- winnable, if not WMD-related. Still, John Trever creatively dropped the C-bomb.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
November 8, 2009 | John Cherwa
The Times' survey of local handicappers on Saturday's Breeders' Cup races turned out be a nice improvement from the dismal first day when only three of seven prognosticators had one win and everyone else had zero. Of course, a lot of that had to do with more favorites coming in. Bob Ike and Jerry Antonucci, both of the Los Angeles Newspaper Group, had three winners, as did Brad Free of the Daily Racing Forum. Toby Turrell, who sells his picks at the track and online, along with The Times' Liam Durbin and Ray Nelson of LANG had two winners.
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SPORTS
February 14, 1997 | BOB MIESZERSKI
There will be no Alphabet Soup-Gentlemen rematch in the $1-million Santa Anita Handicap on March 2. An ankle injury will force Alphabet Soup, who won the $4-million Breeders' Cup Classic in his final start of 1996, to miss the Big 'Cap and it is uncertain how long he will be sidelined. "He wrenched his left front ankle," trainer Dave Hofmans said. "With an injury like this we have to be cautious." Hofmans says the injury might have occurred during the San Antonio Handicap on Feb.
WORLD
March 3, 2008 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Learning your ABCs can be a tough proposition in India. Not the alphabet; even Indians who can't speak English fluently know their letters. But pity the poor soul who strays unprepared into the world of newspapers, magazines, documents, signs, billboards -- in short, anywhere there's text -- only to find that minding your Ps and Qs, literally, can be a headache. That's because this land sometimes seems to have as many initials, acronyms and abbreviations in usage as it does people.
SPORTS
February 4, 1996 | BOB MIESZERSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he saw rain Saturday morning, trainer Dave Hofmans gave some thought to scratching Alphabet Soup in the $304,900 San Antonio Handicap, not wishing to run the 5-year-old on a sealed, hard surface. Once Hofmans saw the track was "getting muddier and muddier," he decided to let the roan try for his third consecutive victory for owner Georgia Ridder. Hofmans made the right choice.
SPORTS
January 16, 1996 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Alphabet Soup was entered to run, in the Native Diver Handicap at Hollywood Park on Dec. 23, the track came up sloppy and the trainers of Best Pal and Luthier Fever scratched their horses. They did the right thing, because Alphabet Soup, who thrives on wet going, won the Native Diver by 7 1/2 lengths. The opposition figured to have a better chance Monday, on a fast track in the $210,100 San Pasqual Handicap, but the result was basically the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND
It's a bizarre, blasted place, that spot where jazz fusion, avant-garde pop music and noise for art's sake cross-fertilize each other. Captain Beefheart was a regular tourist. So was/is Frank Zappa. But Crazy-Backwards Alphabet, which played the Palomino Thursday, not only visits this quirky intersection--the band's planted a flag, built a cabin and has settled in for good.
SPORTS
December 24, 1995 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For two years, the owners of Alphabet Soup kept trying to sell the roan colt. Finally they got an offer that was acceptable. Georgia Ridder bought Alphabet Soup in 1993, when he was a 2-year-old, and now he has won three stakes, collected a paycheck for almost all of his 16 starts and earned close to $400,000.
OPINION
May 25, 1986 | Mickey Kaus, Mickey Kaus is a correspondent for the New Republic
A self-important youth who clerks for a Supreme Court Justice boasted to me the other day that the court has already ruled on the constitutionality of the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings deficit-reduction law. If I were sharp, I could take this inside information and make a fortune on the stock market, even though he didn't tell me what the ruling was. Wall Street brokers hang on any hint of the court's decision because of its enormous potential effect on the economy.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1999 | PAUL J. LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retirement has long been viewed as a race you run from the day you begin working to the day you can finally stop. But the notion that the race is about getting to a "finish" line as fast as you can, and with a huge nest egg saved, doesn't fit reality for many Americans today. This report focuses on different ways of thinking about the journey to retirement--and what life can be like after you get there. * Money isn't everything in retirement, but it obviously comes in handy.
OPINION
December 3, 2006 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Cartoonists spilled ink, commentators spilled their guts, and soldiers and civilians spilled blood ... just another week of the "C-word," to use M.E. Cohen's PC shorthand for civil war. Those who consider the Iraq conflict worthy of the C-word were condemned, contradicted, castigated and urged to keep a civil tongue by the WWW (West Wing of the White House), which clung to W-words -- winnable, if not WMD-related. Still, John Trever creatively dropped the C-bomb.
NEWS
November 24, 2005 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
IT'S the mid-1800s in the Wild West, and Colton White wants to know who killed his father. The only thing White can trust is his pistol, says the cover of the recently released Gun, a video game that has players waging war on horseback, commandeering trains and facing off against corrupt lawmen. For players of first-person shooters like Gun, the cover image of a bullet-holed skull wedged between two rifles is enough ammo for deciding whether to play the game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2004 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
At the Bellflower office of the Department of Motor Vehicles, security guard Robert Alexander has a way with words -- in English, Spanish, Chinese and Tagalog. He has soaked up phrases in four languages, but that doesn't come close to matching the 39 tongues spoken in a 13-square-mile area of southern Los Angeles County from Bellflower to North Long Beach to Artesia -- considered one of the most linguistically varied swaths in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2002 | Steve Harvey
A cost-effective alternative to the "Star Wars" system? The police log of the Dana Point News reported: "Three kids near Sea Canyon Park were using some sort of tube device to launch oranges." At least no one has called him a lemon: I've told you how L.A.'s current mayor was identified as "Mike Haan" in a graphic on one network TV newscast and as "James K. Hahn, Major" on an L.A. city Public Works Department sign. Now David Stone of Encino passes along a photo caption from the Buenos Aires Herald that disputes Hahn's claim to the office--I mean mayor, not major (see accompanying)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2001
The ABCs are a tremendous tool: 26 letters that can help us read the more than 300,000 words in the English language. The alphabet is an innovative system in which symbols represent individual sounds of a language and are combined to form thousands of words. Learn your ABCs and how to alphabetize as well as discover how alphabets became important tools of expression and even works of art through these direct links on The Times Launch Point Web site: http://www.latimes.com/launchpoint.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | ROY RIVENBURG
Sneak Preview Bureau: In yet another entertainment exclusive, Off-Kilter has learned that the Motion Picture Assn. of America is dumping its G, PG, R and NC-17 ratings to inaugurate a system that better explains the content of each movie. For example, PG-13 is being replaced by PG-3.14159: No one admitted who can't compute pi to the fifth decimal point. The rating covers movies involving complex mathematical concepts, such as "Good Will Hunting," "A Brief History of Time" or "The Waterboy."
SPORTS
September 11, 1995 | BOB MIESZERSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chris McCarron won the Fantastic Girl with Track Gal on opening day almost seven weeks ago, and the stakes victories have kept right on coming. The leading stakes-winning rider in Del Mar history made it 97 for his career and 11 for this meeting, guiding Alphabet Soup to a three-quarters-of-a-length victory over Lykatill Hil in the $200,000 added Del Mar Budweiser Breeders' Cup Handicap on Sunday.
SPORTS
June 25, 1997 | BOB MIESZERSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alphabet Soup won't defend his title in the $4-million Breeders' Cup Classic later this year at Hollywood Park. Beset by chronic problems with his left front ankle, the 6-year-old son of Cozzene has been retired and will stand at stud in Kentucky in 1998. Trained by Dave Hofmans for owner-breeder Georgia Ridder and Frank Stronach, who bought a percentage of the horse late last year, Alphabet Soup finished his career with 10 victories from 24 starts and earned $2,990,270.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1999 | PAUL J. LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retirement has long been viewed as a race you run from the day you begin working to the day you can finally stop. But the notion that the race is about getting to a "finish" line as fast as you can, and with a huge nest egg saved, doesn't fit reality for many Americans today. This report focuses on different ways of thinking about the journey to retirement--and what life can be like after you get there. * Money isn't everything in retirement, but it obviously comes in handy.
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