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Alternative Fuel Vehicles

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2001 | STEPHANIE STASSEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drivers of electric and natural-gas cars will soon get a perk for not contributing to Los Angeles' pollution problem: free parking at city meters. Beginning April 2, motorists who drive zero-emission and certain "super ultra-low emission vehicles" will no longer have to feed meters throughout Los Angeles. But drivers will still have to abide by posted time limits, such as two-hour parking.
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BUSINESS
January 21, 1992 | H. JOSEF HEBERT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Facing serious air pollution, America is trying to wean its cars from gasoline. The transition to a cleaner motor fuel won't be quick, but there are signs that gasoline's grip is loosening. For example, President Bush marked the government's purchase of hundreds of alternative-fuel vehicles by taking a spin around the White House driveway last week in a van powered by compressed natural gas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key committee of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority took no action Wednesday on whether to recommend the purchase of 370 new diesel buses, leaving the full MTA board to decide next week on the fate of the agency's policy to buy buses that run only on cleaner-burning fuels. The failure to take a stand reflected the deep division among committee members over whether to abandon the MTA's long-standing commitment to buy buses powered by cleaner fuels.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1996 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joining the rush by Detroit to mass-produce alternative-fuel vehicles, Ford Motor Co. on Tuesday unveiled the first all-natural-gas-powered passenger car to be manufactured by a major auto maker. The vehicle--a specially engineered version of the Ford Crown Victoria sedan--is being marketed as a 1996 model to fleets for use as taxis, police cruisers and the like. But consumers may also order the vehicles.
AUTOS
April 30, 2003 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Actor and environmentalist Dennis Weaver, a proponent of hydrogen-powered cars long before the White House jumped on the bandwagon this year, begins his second Drive to Survive in Los Angeles on Thursday after a 10 a.m. news conference this morning on the Santa Monica Pier. Weaver will lead a caravan of eight alternative-fuel vehicles -- including a gasoline-electric hybrid and a bio-diesel pickup -- on a cross-country drive scheduled to end May 14 in Washington.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS
Washington still may charge into the EV arena. In February, President Clinton said he would support research into "clean car" technology--alternative-fuel vehicles, advanced batteries and fuel cells. The government reportedly could provide $1 billion for the efforts. Federal officials appear more interested in developing hybrid-electric vehicles--equipped with both electric and internal-combustion engines--than in pure EVs.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2010 | By Ronald D. White
Express mail giant FedEx Corp. is preparing to roll out the first of four new all-electric delivery trucks in Los Angeles next month, but Chief Executive Frederick W. Smith said there were still significant barriers to bringing large numbers of zero-emission and low-emission commercial vehicles into service quickly in the U.S. "We would like to significantly expand the number of vehicles we have in this category," Smith said. "But the capital costs are 50% higher than regular vehicles.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH and DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the basin where the word smog was invented, alternative-fuel vehicles--particularly cars that store energy in flywheels--will be a center of attention at this year's Los Angeles Auto Show, which opens Saturday. Chrysler Corp. will show off its concept of a flywheel-assisted race car, which the company unveiled Wednesday in Detroit. And American Flywheel System, a small company based in Bellevue, Wash.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2008 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
With his blue button-down shirt, neat khaki pants and rimless glasses, Mike Lewis doesn't look like much of an evangelist. But that's what he is: an advocate for alternative fuels -- and their profit-pumping potential. Lewis is co-owner of Pearson Fuels, a gas station on El Cajon Boulevard just east of Interstate 15 that sells biodiesel, two kinds of natural gas, vehicle-grade propane and ethanol alongside the usual pumps for gasoline and diesel.
NEWS
November 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
Gary King suspects he knows how the state will recoup the runaway costs from its botched subsidy program for alternative-fuel vehicles: his wallet. "We're all going to have to pay for this one," said the planning consultant from Chandler as he stood in an absentee voting line Monday. The subsidy program, expected to cost about $3 million, will run some $483 million, and the fallout might show on election day as the Republican Legislature feels the heat.
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