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Alyeska Pipeline Service Co

BUSINESS
November 26, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alaska Gov. Walter J. Hickel and the U.S. Justice Department announced Wednesday a $31.7-million settlement with Alyeska Pipeline Service Co., ending the last of the government lawsuits over the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. "We settled all our claims," Alaska Atty. Gen. Charles E. Cole said. "I mean, we're out of there." Alyeska, which operates the trans-Alaska pipeline and loading terminal, is a consortium owned by Exxon and six other oil companies.
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BUSINESS
July 24, 1992 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A draft congressional committee report concludes that the operator of the trans-Alaska oil pipeline may have broken federal and state laws when it ordered a 1990 covert sting operation aimed at silencing environmental whistle-blowers and gathering damaging information on Rep. George Miller (D-Martinez). The draft report, prepared for the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs and released Thursday, recommends that the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Potentially cancer-causing air pollution in the town of Valdez, at the southern end of the trans-Alaska oil pipeline, is as high as in many smoggy U.S. cities, a federally mandated watchdog group said Thursday. The pollution, particularly benzene, in the town of 4,000--"comparable" to levels in Los Angeles--poses a potential hazard to public health, according to a report prepared for the Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dismissing allegations of misconduct against the oil-company consortium that operates the trans-Alaska pipeline, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Friday that empty oil tankers have not been illegally discharging toxic materials at a Valdez treatment facility. But in a formal response to charges by environmentalists and other critics, the EPA called for amending some procedures at the Alyeska Pipeline Service Co.'
BUSINESS
November 7, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last day of hearings into Alyeska Pipeline Service Co.'s covert spyjinks against whistle-blowers ended abruptly when the House Interior Committee opted not to question the Virginia oil tanker broker who was the main target of Alyeska's probe. The committee's chairman, Rep. George Miller (D-Martinez), said committee members decided not to question industry gadfly Charles Hamel because the panel's focus was on the details of the secret probe conducted by Florida-based Wackenhut Corp.
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