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Alza Corp

BUSINESS
April 28, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A big change is brewing in the ranks of California's fastest-growing companies. The Times Growth 100 list has always been dominated by high-tech enterprises, and 1991 was no exception: About half the companies are in some way part of the computer industry. But a changing of the guard is underway. Computer manufacturers and chip-making companies are suddenly sliding down the Growth 100 list, and software companies are finding their way to the top.
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BUSINESS
April 27, 1993
Companies listed alphabetically with their rankings on The Times 100, Sales 100, Market Value 100, Growth 100 and Employer 100 lists. Mrkt Times Sales Value Grwth Emply Company 100 100 100 100 100 20th Century Industries 31 79 50 3Com Corp. 71 41 ADAC Laboratories 47 84 ALZA Corp. 33 16 AST Research Inc. 36 72 38 93 Acuson Corp. 48 Adaptec Inc. 50 96 5 Adia Services Inc. 89 Adobe Systems Inc. 16 74 Advanced Marketing 77 Advanced Micro Devices 24 57 39 76 51 Allergan Inc.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1988 | MALCOLM GLADWELL, The Washington Post
The last thing Alza Corp. ever wanted was a monopoly. When G. D. Searle & Co. withdrew its intrauterine device from the market in January, 1986, Alza became, by default, the last drug company in America to sell an IUD.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1997
Companies ranked by market value, which is stock price times the number of shares outstanding. Also shown: book value, which is a company's theoretical liquidation value, and the market-to-book ratio for each company. *--* 4/18/97 Book Market- '95 market value Value to-book Rank Rank Company (millions) (millions) ratio 1 1 Intel Corp. $112,100 $16,872 6.64% 2 3 Walt Disney Co. 51,817 16,086 3.22 3 2 Hewlett-Packard Co. 50,682 13,438 3.77 4 4 Chevron Corp. 42,223 15,623 2.7 5 BankAmerica Corp.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1992 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI
In her 27 years on Wall Street, Lappin's all-time favorite stocks haven't changed a great deal. Her top pick remains Immunex Corp., a biotechnology firm. She believes investors who buy now will talk about it as do those who invested in Xerox in the late 1950s--a great buy up to $60 per share. Another favorite is Alza Corp., a maker of time-release drug delivery systems, including the transdermal system used by the new "patch" treatments for those wanting to quit smoking, up to $55.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Johnson & Johnson's Alza Corp. and Janssen Pharmaceutica filed a lawsuit seeking to block Mylan Laboratories Inc. from selling a version of Duragesic, a skin patch that administers painkillers. Alza, of Mountain View, Calif., said it owns the patent rights to the skin patch. Johnson & Johnson's Janssen, based in Titusville, N.J., is the exclusive U.S. distributor of Duragesic. The company said the Duragesic patch had worldwide sales of $875 million last year.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Alza Corp. agreed to buy Therapeutic Discovery Corp. for $100 million, or $12.30 a share, reacquiring the developer of drug delivery systems that it spun off in 1993. Alza makes and licenses drugs that use novel delivery systems, such as skin patches, and Therapeutic Discovery develops the delivery systems for the drugs. At the time of the spinoff, Alza received an option to buy back Therapeutic Discovery's Class A stock, which represents virtually all of its equity.
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