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Alzheimer S Assn

December 4, 1992
I am amazed, incredulous, and in a sense outraged by the remarks of Shelly Fabares, chairperson of an Alzheimer's Assn. benefit ("Alzheimer's Assn. Spends a 'Night at Sardi's,' " Nov. 23) indicating that Alzheimer's disease "makes you feel helpless because you can't do anything for this person you love." As a resident about to become 85 of Leisure World, with its many stimulating activities and with a highly competent and effective social service department working to promote healthy, useful lives of an increasing older population, I think it is obvious that improving environmental social circumstances helps prevent the impairment of our physical and mental capacities.
December 19, 1990 | ANN CONWAY
There were no searchlights at this Columbia premiere--no stretch limos, no mugging celebs, not one autograph hound. But the excitement was there just the same for Orange County's benefit preview of "Awakenings" last week at Edwards South Coast Plaza Theatre. The movie starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro had hundreds of supporters of the South Coast Institute for Applied Gerontology and the Alzheimer's Assn. applauding, guffawing and weeping shamelessly.
December 28, 2000 | ANNA GORMAN
A local chapter of the Alzheimer's Assn. has received $42,000 from various groups to provide expanded services to Ventura County residents. Oxnard awarded the county chapter $5,000 for an education program that will pay for a series of presentations to families and professionals at senior centers throughout the city.
July 16, 1996 | ANN CONWAY
About 250 people streamed into the Four Seasons Hotel in Newport Beach on Saturday to attend a Jewel of an Evening to Remember, a benefit for the Alzheimer's Assn. of Orange County. Guests bid on silent auction items during a cocktail reception, enjoyed a sit-down repast of potato-crusted halibut and danced to the music of the Sam Conti Orchestra. Proceeds estimated at $69,000 will help fund the association's support group for early-stage Alzheimer's patients.
July 28, 2008 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
For PEOPLE already diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, waiting for research breakthroughs is disheartening. But life can still be lived with hope, says Wantland J. Smith, 69, a retired architect who was diagnosed with early-stage Alzheimer's at age 66. Smith, of Los Angeles, takes medications to treat his symptoms, attends support-group meetings and even does volunteer advocacy work for the Alzheimer's Assn. in Los Angeles. However, his best therapy, he says, is traveling with his wife, playing a guitar, attending music camps, singing in a choir, reading and meditation.
May 15, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Asserting "we are at an exceptional moment" in the hunt for an Alzheimer'sdiseasetreatment, National Institutes of Health director Dr. Francis Collins on Tuesday promised a raft of new research aimed at stopping and reversing the memory-robbing disorder by the year 2025. In unveiling a first-ever "national strategy" on Alzheimer's disease, Collins launched several new projects and clinical trials--including a whole-genome sequencing effort to identify genes that confer vulnerability to--or protection against-- Alzheimer's, and a trial to explore whether an inhaled form of insulin will slow progression of the disease.
For more than a decade, the Alzheimer's Assn. of Orange County has been helping seniors with the disease reconnect themselves to their past through art. The program, Memories in the Making, uses artistic expression--painting, sculpting, collage making and drawing--to help patients remember their past and help relieve stress. Alzheimer's patients typically suffer from profound memory loss, disorientation and speech difficulty. There is no cure.
March 15, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
An estimated 5.4 million people in the U.S. have Alzheimer's disease. That leads to … 14.9 million unpaid caregivers, $183 billion in annual costs. So begins the latest report from the Alzheimer's Assn. The report, 2011 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures , sheds more light on the toll the disease takes on not just patients but caregivers. "Unpaid caregivers are primarily family members, but they also include other relatives and friends," the report says.
March 8, 2001
George Carroll Schrader, a retired dairy worker, died Monday at Community Memorial Hospital in Ventura. He was 82. He was born Jan. 28, 1919, in Lincoln, Neb., and graduated from high school there. He began working for Meadow Gold Dairy in Lincoln after high school. Schrader met his future wife, Clarice Miller, when they were in the ninth grade, and the couple married on March 2, 1940. They moved to Ventura in 1947 and he took a job with Valentine Dairy.
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