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Alzheimer S Assn

NEWS
December 21, 1989
Dear Mr. Wong: I am writing to compliment you on the excellent and informative article in the Nov. 2, 1989, issue of Orange County Life entitled "Painting the Past." Your coverage of the art exhibit of works by Alzheimer's patients was thorough, very professional and very much on target. The exhibit, called "Memories in the Making '89," is a new and unique idea, one which is breaking ground in the areas of patient communication and research. It has given those who view the artworks an opportunity to see into the "windows on the soul" still alive in the patients devastated by this disease.
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NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Asserting "we are at an exceptional moment" in the hunt for an Alzheimer'sdiseasetreatment, National Institutes of Health director Dr. Francis Collins on Tuesday promised a raft of new research aimed at stopping and reversing the memory-robbing disorder by the year 2025. In unveiling a first-ever "national strategy" on Alzheimer's disease, Collins launched several new projects and clinical trials--including a whole-genome sequencing effort to identify genes that confer vulnerability to--or protection against-- Alzheimer's, and a trial to explore whether an inhaled form of insulin will slow progression of the disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2001
George Carroll Schrader, a retired dairy worker, died Monday at Community Memorial Hospital in Ventura. He was 82. He was born Jan. 28, 1919, in Lincoln, Neb., and graduated from high school there. He began working for Meadow Gold Dairy in Lincoln after high school. Schrader met his future wife, Clarice Miller, when they were in the ninth grade, and the couple married on March 2, 1940. They moved to Ventura in 1947 and he took a job with Valentine Dairy.
HEALTH
July 28, 2008 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
For PEOPLE already diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, waiting for research breakthroughs is disheartening. But life can still be lived with hope, says Wantland J. Smith, 69, a retired architect who was diagnosed with early-stage Alzheimer's at age 66. Smith, of Los Angeles, takes medications to treat his symptoms, attends support-group meetings and even does volunteer advocacy work for the Alzheimer's Assn. in Los Angeles. However, his best therapy, he says, is traveling with his wife, playing a guitar, attending music camps, singing in a choir, reading and meditation.
HEALTH
April 25, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
For the first time in 27 years, health authorities have expanded the definition of Alzheimer's disease. The change, announced last week by the National Institutes of Health and the Alzheimer's Assn., is intended to help doctors diagnose patients in the very early stages of the neurological disorder, including those who have yet to develop any outward symptoms. The new approach could ultimately help millions of older Americans spend more years with their mental faculties intact. By the time a patient becomes demented, it is "too late" for medications to be of any help, says William H. Thies, chief scientific and medical officer of the Alzheimer's Assn.
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
An estimated 5.4 million people in the U.S. have Alzheimer's disease. That leads to … 14.9 million unpaid caregivers, $183 billion in annual costs. So begins the latest report from the Alzheimer's Assn. The report, 2011 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures , sheds more light on the toll the disease takes on not just patients but caregivers. "Unpaid caregivers are primarily family members, but they also include other relatives and friends," the report says.
NEWS
August 3, 1997
Alzheimer's is a degenerative disease of the brain in which nerve cells stop communicating with one another, damaging the centers affecting memory, speech and personality. Parts of the brain that control other functions, such as heartbeat and breathing, often remain intact. Although scientists believe the disease can start decades before symptoms do, patients may live with the disease five to 20 years after its diagnosis. In fact, says the Alzheimer's Assn.
NEWS
December 19, 1990 | ANN CONWAY
There were no searchlights at this Columbia premiere--no stretch limos, no mugging celebs, not one autograph hound. But the excitement was there just the same for Orange County's benefit preview of "Awakenings" last week at Edwards South Coast Plaza Theatre. The movie starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro had hundreds of supporters of the South Coast Institute for Applied Gerontology and the Alzheimer's Assn. applauding, guffawing and weeping shamelessly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2000 | Stephen J. Einstein, Einstein is rabbi of Congregation B'nai Tzedek, 9669 Talbert Ave., Fountain Valley
Jewish tradition teaches that one good deed leads to another. Some 16 months ago, I was honored to be invited to inaugurate this column. A word--spoken or written--is like a pebble dropped into a pond. Its ripples extend to places unexpected. Months later, I received a phone call from the chairman of the Religious Advisory Committee of the Alzheimer's Assn. asking me to share in their work.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
Utah authorities think they have a valuable new use for the ubiquitous ankle bracelet: to locate missing patients with Alzheimer's or dementia.  Officials in Davis County, about half an hour north of Salt Lake City, say the device, which typically monitors criminals on house arrest or parole, could be a cost-effective solution to a common problem. “We think it's just a different application for an existing technology,” Deputy Sheriff Kevin Fielding told the Los Angeles Times.
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