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Alzheimer S Assn

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2000 | GREG RISLING
Nearly all of the speakers who helped open the Alzheimer's Assn. Center at Cal State Northridge on Friday have been deeply affected by the degenerative disease. Actress Shelley Fabares, who starred in the television programs "The Donna Reed Show" and "Coach," lost her mother eight years ago to Alzheimer's. Former Pasadena Mayor Katie Nack's husband is in the latter stages of the disease. Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky watches a close relative struggle with some symptoms.
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NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Pat Summitt says she has early onset dementia -- Alzheimer's type -- but isn't going to let that keep her from what she loves doing: coaching women's basketball at the University of Tennessee. In a heartfelt interview with the Washington Post, the winningest coach in college basketball explained that she had received the diagnosis but that it took her a while to accept it.  Early-onset Alzheimer's can be a difficult diagnosis to face. It sets in well before the age of 65, the Mayo Clinic explains, the typical lower limit for standard Alzheimer's disease, and thus affects people when they're still in their prime, often with elderly parents or young children to care for as well.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Some people with mild Alzheimer's may be reclassified as having a less serious brain disease called mild cognitive impairment, according to a new analysis of the evolving terminology. Last year, a work group convened by the National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer's Assn., issued revised criteria for diagnosing mild cognitive impairment. According to this new definition, people with mild cognitive impairment still have "functional independence" and no dementia. However, a researcher at Washington University in St. Louis sought to evaluate the impact of the revised criteria.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
Utah authorities think they have a valuable new use for the ubiquitous ankle bracelet: to locate missing patients with Alzheimer's or dementia.  Officials in Davis County, about half an hour north of Salt Lake City, say the device, which typically monitors criminals on house arrest or parole, could be a cost-effective solution to a common problem. “We think it's just a different application for an existing technology,” Deputy Sheriff Kevin Fielding told the Los Angeles Times.
HEALTH
February 6, 2012
The Alzheimer's Assn. has compiled a list of 10 warning signs of Alzheimer's and how they differ from mental glitches that shouldn't faze you. They include: Memory loss that disrupts daily life. Challenges in planning or solving problems. Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure. Confusion with time or place. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships. New problems with words in speaking or writing. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps.
HEALTH
August 17, 2009 | Jill U. Adams
People may be able to reduce their risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, according to two recently published studies that are the latest in a long line of research. But does that hold for everyone? And by how much can you lower the risk? Here's a look at the facts. Alzheimer's afflicts 5.3 million Americans and that number is predicted to grow to nearly 8 million in the next 20 years, according to a 2009 report by the Alzheimer's Assn. Because the disease has no cure, medical researchers continue to focus on preventing or delaying the disease.
HEALTH
April 25, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
For the first time in 27 years, health authorities have expanded the definition of Alzheimer's disease. The change, announced last week by the National Institutes of Health and the Alzheimer's Assn., is intended to help doctors diagnose patients in the very early stages of the neurological disorder, including those who have yet to develop any outward symptoms. The new approach could ultimately help millions of older Americans spend more years with their mental faculties intact. By the time a patient becomes demented, it is "too late" for medications to be of any help, says William H. Thies, chief scientific and medical officer of the Alzheimer's Assn.
SCIENCE
February 6, 2013 | By Joseph Serna, Los Angeles Times
As baby boomers enter their golden years, the number of people afflicted with Alzheimer's disease is expected to reach 13.8 million by 2050 - millions more than previously anticipated, according to a new study in the journal Neurology. If researchers can't find a way to reduce the prevalence of the brain disease, the cost to care for all of these patients could top $1 trillion a year, experts say. Alzheimer's is a progressive brain disease that damages patients' memory and cognitive skills, ultimately leaving them unable to care for themselves.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | KATHRYN BOLD
The event: Rock 'n' Roll Royale Casino Night, a Vegas-style gala that had guests taking a chance with Lady Luck on Thursday at the Hard Rock Cafe in Newport Beach. Staged by Team X-treme, a group of young professionals that supports the Alzheimer's Assn. of Orange County, the casino night raised a jackpot for the chapter's help line. Full house: A pair of massive fuzzy dice dangled above the heads of 350 guests as they made their way into the Hard Rock for a night of fun and games.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Carla Hall
More good news for women (not): More of them are suffering from Alzheimer's disease than men. The Alzheimer's Assn.'s recently released annual report on the grim facts and figures of this debilitating disease and other related dementias says that an estimated 3.2 million women aged 65 and older in the U.S. are living with Alzheimer's. That's two-thirds of the 5 million seniors in America with the disease. Just looking at this statistically, the association reports that 65-year-old women not afflicted with Alzheimer's still have a 1 in 6 chance of getting it. Men that age have a 1 in 11 chance.
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