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HOME & GARDEN
May 29, 2010 | Rosemary McClure, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The e-mail alert shouted its message: "Missing Person with Alzheimer's. PLEASE HELP. " It was sent to Alzheimer's Assn. chapters and to law enforcement officials within hours after an Orange County woman disappeared while on a short trip to visit a friend. The woman had set out in her car, made a wrong turn and became confused, says her family, who asked that her name not be used to protect her privacy. During the next two days, she zigzagged her way across two states, making one wrong turn after another, putting ever more miles between herself and her home as she headed east.
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HEALTH
August 17, 2009 | Jill U. Adams
People may be able to reduce their risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, according to two recently published studies that are the latest in a long line of research. But does that hold for everyone? And by how much can you lower the risk? Here's a look at the facts. Alzheimer's afflicts 5.3 million Americans and that number is predicted to grow to nearly 8 million in the next 20 years, according to a 2009 report by the Alzheimer's Assn. Because the disease has no cure, medical researchers continue to focus on preventing or delaying the disease.
HEALTH
July 28, 2008 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
For PEOPLE already diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, waiting for research breakthroughs is disheartening. But life can still be lived with hope, says Wantland J. Smith, 69, a retired architect who was diagnosed with early-stage Alzheimer's at age 66. Smith, of Los Angeles, takes medications to treat his symptoms, attends support-group meetings and even does volunteer advocacy work for the Alzheimer's Assn. in Los Angeles. However, his best therapy, he says, is traveling with his wife, playing a guitar, attending music camps, singing in a choir, reading and meditation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2001
George Carroll Schrader, a retired dairy worker, died Monday at Community Memorial Hospital in Ventura. He was 82. He was born Jan. 28, 1919, in Lincoln, Neb., and graduated from high school there. He began working for Meadow Gold Dairy in Lincoln after high school. Schrader met his future wife, Clarice Miller, when they were in the ninth grade, and the couple married on March 2, 1940. They moved to Ventura in 1947 and he took a job with Valentine Dairy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2000 | ANNA GORMAN
A local chapter of the Alzheimer's Assn. has received $42,000 from various groups to provide expanded services to Ventura County residents. Oxnard awarded the county chapter $5,000 for an education program that will pay for a series of presentations to families and professionals at senior centers throughout the city.
NEWS
April 29, 2000 | GREG RISLING
Nearly all of the speakers who helped open the Alzheimer's Assn. Center at Cal State Northridge on Friday have been deeply affected by the degenerative disease. Actress Shelley Fabares, who starred in the television programs "The Donna Reed Show" and "Coach," lost her mother eight years ago to Alzheimer's. Former Pasadena Mayor Katie Nack's husband is in the latter stages of the disease. Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky watches a close relative struggle with some symptoms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2000 | GREG RISLING
Nearly all of the speakers who helped open the Alzheimer's Assn. Center at Cal State Northridge on Friday have been deeply affected by the degenerative disease. Actress Shelley Fabares, who starred in the television programs "The Donna Reed Show" and "Coach," lost her mother eight years ago to Alzheimer's. Former Pasadena Mayor Katie Nack's husband is in the latter stages of the disease. Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky watches a close relative struggle with some symptoms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2000 | Stephen J. Einstein, Einstein is rabbi of Congregation B'nai Tzedek, 9669 Talbert Ave., Fountain Valley
Jewish tradition teaches that one good deed leads to another. Some 16 months ago, I was honored to be invited to inaugurate this column. A word--spoken or written--is like a pebble dropped into a pond. Its ripples extend to places unexpected. Months later, I received a phone call from the chairman of the Religious Advisory Committee of the Alzheimer's Assn. asking me to share in their work.
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