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Alzheimer S Disease

NEWS
July 20, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Some signs of Alzheimer's disease appear in cerebrospinal fluid 10 or 20 years before symptoms of the disease appear in families with an inherited form of the disease, a finding that may help provide early diagnosis in those with sporadic forms of the disease, researchers said Wednesday. The findings may also provide a group of subjects in whom potential Alzheimer's drugs can be tested to determine if they work better when used at the earliest stages of the disease, according to researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
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HEALTH
December 7, 2009 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Is there really a connection between drinking juices out of aluminum cans and developing Alzheimer's disease? It is unlikely that drinking fruit or vegetable juice from aluminum cans would increase the risk of Alzheimer's. Aluminum cans are coated with a plastic lining to prevent corrosion and protect juice from acquiring a metallic flavor. These liners are not completely innocuous, we fear. Many of them contain bisphenol A (BPA), a compound that mimics estrogen. A December analysis in Consumer Reports notes that some juice and canned foods contain measurable amounts of BPA. :: Is there an exercise that helps relieve vertigo?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1985
Thank you for your editorial support of the passage of AB 2541, which would fund the mental health system "to make a difference." My family has had two victims of brain disfunction, a 21-year-old with schizophrenia and a 75-year-old with Alzheimer's disease. Both diseases are mysterious in origin but physical in nature and progressive. One does not have to have taken drugs to be ill with schizophrenia; unknown before the Industrial Revolution, it is increasing rapidly. Alzheimer's was rare 100 years ago but it also is increasing rapidly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2006 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
Alzheimer's disease for the first time has emerged as one of the leading causes of death in Los Angeles County, mirroring a fast-growing and increasingly costly nationwide trend tied to the aging baby boomer generation, health officials said Wednesday. The death rate from Alzheimer's jumped 220% -- or from 5 to 16 deaths out of every 100,000 people -- from 1994 to 2003, according to a new county Department of Public Health mortality report.
NEWS
July 20, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
At least half of all cases of Alzheimer's disease can be linked to seven major risk factors, and controlling them could sharply reduce the risk of developing the devastating disease, according to researchers from UC San Francisco and the San Francsco VA Medical Center. Leading the list worldwide is lack of education -- specifically not finishing high school -- while living the life of a couch potato is the biggest risk factor in the United States, according to the study presented Tuesday at a Paris meeting of the International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease and published online in the journal Lancet Neurology.
HEALTH
July 26, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
The audience wasn't happy. Its members — private citizens, healthcare professionals and advocates for the elderly — had gathered to hear a report on how to prevent Alzheimer's; instead, they were told that, in fact, nothing has been proved to keep the disease at bay. "We're not trying to take anyone's hope away," said report co-author Dr. Carl C. Bell, a professor of psychiatry and public health at the University of Illinois, Chicago,...
OPINION
November 21, 2011
There's one thing that all Alzheimer's researchers agree on: The mind-robbing illness is heartbreaking. But after three decades of study that have produced neither cure nor medications that significantly slow its progress, some researchers are asking: What if it's not a disease with a cure? What if it's just an unfortunate but inevitable part of aging, along with wrinkly skin, osteoporosis and heart disease? In a study in the December issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, a research group led by Dr. Ming Chen at the University of South Florida suggests that "tremendous social pressures" have pushed scientists to target Alzheimer's as a curable disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1999
Molecular biologists have created a strain of mice that models one of the key features of Alzheimer's disease, the accumulation of "tangles" containing a protein called tau. The tangles, along with another deposit called plaque, are one of the key features of the disease, which affects as many as 4 million Americans. A team from the University of Pennsylvania reports in the November issue of Neuron that it added an extra copy of the tau gene to mice.
SCIENCE
December 10, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The diabetes drug Avandia can enhance memory in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease, but only in patients with a certain genetic profile, researchers from GlaxoSmithKline reported Wednesday at a UC San Diego meeting. The finding supports the hypothesis that impaired glucose metabolism may play a role in the onset of the disorder. The study, using about 500 patients, showed that the drug worked only in patients who did not have a gene variant known as ApoE4.
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