Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAlzheimer S Disease
IN THE NEWS

Alzheimer S Disease

NEWS
July 23, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
People with below-average head size have as much as 18 times the normal risk of developing dementia caused by Alzheimer's and other diseases, Washington state researchers have found. The findings suggest that such individuals do not have enough brain cells in reserve to offset the loss of cells caused by aging and neurological diseases, said epidemiologist Amy B. Graves of Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Seattle.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 27, 2010
A protein released when rheumatoid arthritis is present in the body may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease. The surprise finding in a mouse study may explain why people with rheumatoid arthritis have lower rates of developing Alzheimer's. Experts used to think that the drugs that people took for rheumatoid arthritis -- called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs -- also reduced the risk of Alzheimer's disease. That led to clinical trials to see if NSAIDs reduced the risk of Alzheimer's in a range of patients.
HEALTH
December 7, 2009 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Is there really a connection between drinking juices out of aluminum cans and developing Alzheimer's disease? It is unlikely that drinking fruit or vegetable juice from aluminum cans would increase the risk of Alzheimer's. Aluminum cans are coated with a plastic lining to prevent corrosion and protect juice from acquiring a metallic flavor. These liners are not completely innocuous, we fear. Many of them contain bisphenol A (BPA), a compound that mimics estrogen. A December analysis in Consumer Reports notes that some juice and canned foods contain measurable amounts of BPA. :: Is there an exercise that helps relieve vertigo?
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The decision by health experts to separate Alzheimer's disease from age-related dementia and deem it potentially curableĀ  "opened a Pandora's box" and may have misdirected research for decades, a team of scientists suggests in a new analysis of the field. Despite great efforts to find treatments to stop or slow progression of the disease, there are only a few medications for Alzheimer's disease and they only help mitigate symptoms, not the disease process. In their paper, published in the December issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease , researchers from the University of South Florida propose that senile dementia, which includes Alzheimer's, is not a distinct disease but can be explained by simple aging along with other risk factors.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Experimental drug treatments promising to slow or reverse the progression of Alzheimer's disease will need to be assessed with a new and more subtle set of rules, a pair of FDA officials wrote this week. The resulting new guidelines, predict some researchers, should allow Alzheimer's drugs under development to travel a faster path to the U.S. market -- and to the more than 5 million Americans who need them. The new guidelines, issued to drug developers last month and outlined this week in the New England Journal of Medicine, reflect a growing shift among both physicians and researchers toward earlier detection and treatment of the memory-robbing disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1999
Molecular biologists have created a strain of mice that models one of the key features of Alzheimer's disease, the accumulation of "tangles" containing a protein called tau. The tangles, along with another deposit called plaque, are one of the key features of the disease, which affects as many as 4 million Americans. A team from the University of Pennsylvania reports in the November issue of Neuron that it added an extra copy of the tau gene to mice.
SCIENCE
December 10, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The diabetes drug Avandia can enhance memory in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease, but only in patients with a certain genetic profile, researchers from GlaxoSmithKline reported Wednesday at a UC San Diego meeting. The finding supports the hypothesis that impaired glucose metabolism may play a role in the onset of the disorder. The study, using about 500 patients, showed that the drug worked only in patients who did not have a gene variant known as ApoE4.
HEALTH
January 31, 2005 | From Reuters
People who have high blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes or who smoke in midlife have a much higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease later on, U.S. researchers have found. And the more factors a person has, the higher the risk. People with all four risk factors have more than double the risk of Alzheimer's, reported a team at Kaiser Permanente's division of research in Oakland. "The message is that the risk factors that are bad for the heart are bad for the brain," said Dr.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A government-sponsored trial aimed at seeing if painkillers can reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease is not only useless, but dangerous and should be stopped, Public Citizen said. The consumer group, which has lobbied against certain diet pills and other drugs, said the study is using the wrong drugs.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|