Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAlzheimer S Disease
IN THE NEWS

Alzheimer S Disease

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1990 | SHANNON SANDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At 94, Rose Williams suffers from Alzheimer's disease, which wreaks havoc with her memory. But she nevertheless recalls growing up in Texas with 10 siblings and a determination to go to college. "I had to chop cotton and pick cotton and everything, but I didn't plow," Williamssaid. "I didn't want anything to do with farming. I wouldn't have married a farmer ifhe was made of gold." Now, just having a hand to hold and someone to talk to about those times makes Williamshappy.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 1, 1987 | LARRY DOYLE, United Press International
'Although we don't know much, it's a lot compared to what we didn't know 10 or 15 years ago.'--Dr. David Drachman Dr. David Drachman always includes a caveat when discussing Alzheimer's disease. "This is a tough disease," said Drachman, head of neurology at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center and chairman of the scientific advisory committee for the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Assn. "I believe a treatment may be available for the next generation," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1994 | NANCY SHULINS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For much of her life, Sadie had it all: good health, a fine home, a family that adored her. But with old age came senility, robbing her, bit by bit, of her personality. Once known for her hearty appetite, she picked at her food, sometimes wandering off in the middle of a meal. She began getting lost in the only home she'd ever known. A lifelong extrovert, she sat for hours staring at the wall. Test after test came back normal. But the signs were all there: memory loss, confusion, inappropriate outbursts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1995 | TIM MAY
About 150,000 people in the Los Angeles area are afflicted with Alzheimer's disease, a dementia that can cause memory lapses and loss in mostly elderly patients, according to the national Alzheimer's Assn. "Every one of those persons is a potential wanderer," said Karen Jacobsen, director of the association's western region branch and chief of the local Safe Return program, aimed at tracking Alzheimer's patients who wander from their homes and speeding their safe return.
NEWS
July 23, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
People with below-average head size have as much as 18 times the normal risk of developing dementia caused by Alzheimer's and other diseases, Washington state researchers have found. The findings suggest that such individuals do not have enough brain cells in reserve to offset the loss of cells caused by aging and neurological diseases, said epidemiologist Amy B. Graves of Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Seattle.
NEWS
July 20, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Some signs of Alzheimer's disease appear in cerebrospinal fluid 10 or 20 years before symptoms of the disease appear in families with an inherited form of the disease, a finding that may help provide early diagnosis in those with sporadic forms of the disease, researchers said Wednesday. The findings may also provide a group of subjects in whom potential Alzheimer's drugs can be tested to determine if they work better when used at the earliest stages of the disease, according to researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Experimental drug treatments promising to slow or reverse the progression of Alzheimer's disease will need to be assessed with a new and more subtle set of rules, a pair of FDA officials wrote this week. The resulting new guidelines, predict some researchers, should allow Alzheimer's drugs under development to travel a faster path to the U.S. market -- and to the more than 5 million Americans who need them. The new guidelines, issued to drug developers last month and outlined this week in the New England Journal of Medicine, reflect a growing shift among both physicians and researchers toward earlier detection and treatment of the memory-robbing disease.
NEWS
March 10, 2002 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Dabney is not doing so well. Slumped in his wheelchair, he gazes into the closet of his Bakersfield apartment, a bare bulb illuminating two lonely shirts. There's a boxed tinsel tree that never made it out for Christmas. Then he points to the suitcases. After three months, he still cannot bear to open them. His wife was the last to close them, the morning she vanished. Margie Dabney at 70 suffers from Alzheimer's disease and is lost in America--most likely Dallas-Fort Worth, but who can say?
HEALTH
October 11, 2004 | From the Hartford Courant
Brightly colored plates and dishes might help Alzheimer's patients finish their meals, Boston University researchers suggest. Alzheimer's patients often have trouble distinguishing objects from backgrounds, and researchers theorized that the visual perception problem might partially explain rapid weight loss in many dementia patients. The researchers measured food consumed by Alzheimer's patients who ate on high-contrast blue or red tableware and low-contrast white plates, cups and saucers.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
No one wants to hear that he or she has Alzheimer's disease. But if the beta-amyloid plaques that are the disorder's key physical hallmark could be detected before memory loss and cognitive troubles were evident to all, would you want to know? And since no treatment currently works to stem the inexorable progress ofAlzheimer's, who would pay for a costly test to detect it early -- and why? Those questions are no longer hypothetical. Last week, the FDA approved an agent called Florbetapir F 18 injection (to be marketed as Amyvid)
Los Angeles Times Articles
|