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Alzheimers Disease

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SCIENCE
July 17, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
The “senior moments” of unreliable memory may be a scientifically valid way to predict Alzheimer's disease, after all. Alzheimer's disease experts gathered at an international conference in Boston this week have a fancy name for that sense that your noggin' is just not ticking like the old days - subjective cognitive impairment. Studies in the last few years have been trying to bridge a divide between the anecdotal evidence of memory decline and objective, measureable signs, such as atrophy of certain brain regions evident through imaging devices, genetic anomalies on a cellular level, and other clinical tests.
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SCIENCE
March 10, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
For the first time, a test that detects 10 types of lipids, or fats, circulating in a person's blood has been shown to predict accurately whether he or she will develop the memory loss and mental decline of Alzheimer's disease over the next two to three years. A screening test based on the findings could be available in as little as two years, said the researchers who identified the blood biomarkers. The effort to identify predictors of Alzheimer's disease that are reliable, easy and inexpensive to detect was described Sunday in the journal Nature Medicine.
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NEWS
November 17, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
Alzheimer’s disease isn’t always easy to recognize because early symptoms can be mistaken for normal aging. This is particularly true in the Latino community where awareness and resources may be in short supply. The Chicago Tribune says a new effort in that city aims to close the gap by having specialists conduct memory screenings and follow-up services in Spanish. "Alzheimer's exacts a particularly heavy toll among Latinos, who tend to get the condition almost seven years earlier and live with it longer than white Americans, according to research from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of California at San Francisco," the story says.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
Seth Rogen visited Capitol Hill on Wednesday not to discuss the legalization of marijuana, nor to shoot the third season of Netflix's "House of Cards . " No, Mr. Rogen went to Washington to make a case for Alzheimer's disease research. Yeah, we're just as surprised as you are. The "This Is the End" star, 31, who serves as an Alzheimer's Assn. celebrity champion, addressed a Senate committee about the neurodegenerative disorder and opened up about the plight of his mother-in-law, Adele, his authenticity punctuated with self-deprecating humor during a hearing about the rising cost of Alzheimer's.
OPINION
June 24, 2011
The Grammy Award-winning singer Glen Campbell announced this week that he is suffering from Alzheimer's disease. And then he said he'd be going on the road for a farewell tour. It's not unusual for a public figure to reveal a diagnosis of the insidious disease. Former President Reagan told the world of his battle with Alzheimer's in a poignant letter in 1994. Actor Charlton Heston disclosed, via a taped statement, that he was suffering from symptoms similar to those of Alzheimer's.
NEWS
February 28, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Besides age, the biggest risk factor for developing Alzheimer’s disease is having a parent or other first-degree relative with the condition. A new study adds to growing evidence that inheriting it from your mother is much worse than inheriting it from your father. Researchers at the University of Kansas School of Medicine recruited 21 adult children (age 63 to 83) of Alzheimer’s patients who were still “cognitively intact.” They examined their brains using an MRI scanner on two occasions, two years apart.
NEWS
December 13, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Here’s yet another reason to watch your cholesterol – the “good” kind may reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease later in life. That nugget comes from researchers at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. They recruited 1,130 senior citizens from Manhattan (all of them age 65 or older) and took baseline measurements of their cholesterol levels and their neurological states. They also checked to see whether these seniors had a particular mutation in the APOE gene that could increase their risk of developing Alzheimer’s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Seen any good comedies about Alzheimer's disease lately? "One of the things you realize in the course of this kind of degenerative (process) is that either you develop a sense of humor and a sense of patience--or you don't cope," said Steven Kent, director of Jo Carson's "Daytrips" (at the Los Angeles Theatre Center). The play focuses on three generations of a contemporary Tennessee family: grandmother, mother and daughter (whose character doubles as the narrator).
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
A virus may cause at least some cases of Alzheimer's disease, a mental disorder that affects about 2.5 million Americans, according to researchers at Yale University. The researchers found that white blood cells from relatives of Alzheimer's victims caused an Alzheimer's-like disease when they were injected into hamsters. Neurologists have long suspected that Alzheimer's might be caused by a virus, but more than 50 previous attempts to transmit the disease to animals were unsuccessful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1989 | Times staff and wire reports
USC researchers have developed a new clue about the cause of Alzheimer's disease, a mystifying disease that causes mental deterioration in as many as 4 million aging Americans. The primary physical manifestation of Alzheimer's in the brain is the accumulation of clumps of a protein called amyloid. These protein deposits may interfere with normal communication between brain cells.
SCIENCE
December 30, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Well before signs of dementia trigger a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, a person's cholesterol levels may be a bellwether of amyloid plaque build-up in the brain, a new study finds. Long considered a reliable predictor of heart attacks and strokes, worrisome cholesterol levels may now raise concerns about dementia risk as well, prompting more aggressive use of drugs, including statins, that alter cholesterol levels. The current study does "not convincingly exclude the possibility" that taking statins might lower amyloid deposition, the researchers said.
SCIENCE
December 26, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Elderly people who have both mild cognitive impairment and a history of serious concussion showed higher amounts of the protein deposits associated with Alzheimer's disease , according to a new study. The results, published Thursday in the journal Neurology, suggest a potential link between a history of head trauma and later cognitive decline. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., enlisted 589 elderly residents of surrounding Olmsted County, beginning in 2004, and administered a battery of cognitive and memory tests, along with brain scans that reveal both structure and metabolic function.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Los Angeles County's mortality rate dropped 19% between 2001 and 2010, according to a new report from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. Data compiled for the report , which was released Monday, showed that death rates due to coronary heart disease fell 37% over that decade. Death rates due to stroke fell 35%. One ailment that bucked the trend was Alzheimer's disease, which saw death rates double, a sign of the aging population as well as increased awareness of the condition, the report noted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Shortly before she entered graduate school at Johns Hopkins University in 1970, Candace Pert broke her back in a riding accident. Dulling the pain from her injury with morphine led her to speculate about how the drug exerted its effects on the brain. Her graduate advisor, neuroscientist Solomon H. Snyder, set her to searching for an insulin receptor and discouraged her from following her interest in morphine. According to Pert's account, he ultimately forbade her to attempt to explain morphine's mechanism of action.
SCIENCE
September 20, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
The mounting problem of caring for an aging population isn't unique to the U.S., according to a new report from the coalition Alzheimer's Disease International. Around the world, about 101 million people ages 60 and older need special care today. By 2050, that number will increase to 277 million, report author and King's College London psychiatrist Dr. Martin Prince and collaborators wrote, noting that most long-term care for the elderly is targeted at patients who suffer from dementia -- and that those patients present a particularly difficult challenge for the care system.
SCIENCE
August 19, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
New research finds that copper in amounts readily found in our drinking water, the foods we eat and the vitamin supplements we take likely plays a key role in initiating and fueling the abnormal protein build-up and brain inflammation that are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. While the mineral is important to healthy nerve conduction, hormone secretion and the growth of bones and connective tissue, a team of researchers from the University of Rochester Medical Center suggested that too much of it may be a bad thing, and they set about to explore copper's dark side.
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
Relatives of Alzheimer's disease patients face an escalating chance of developing the condition as they age, and that likelihood rises markedly starting at age 75 and reaches 50% by age 90, a new study has found. At age 65, such relatives have a 2.7% chance of developing the disease; by age 75, the risk increases to 14.6% and by age 86 to nearly 46%, according to the study. By 90, one of two Alzheimer's patients' blood relatives could statistically expect to develop the disorder.
NEWS
September 1, 2010
The vaunted protection that intellectually active adults get from Alzheimer’s disease has a dark downside, a study released Wednesday has found. Once dementia symptoms become evident and Alzheimer’s disease is diagnosed in such patients, their mental decline can come with frightening speed.      That finding, published in the journal Neurology , comes from a study of 1,157 Chicago-based seniors who were followed for an average of just over 11 years. Six years after gauging the extent to which the study participants engaged in activities that challenged their mental capacities, researchers from Rush University Medical Center Alzheimer’s Disease Center made periodic assessments of the study participants’ cognitive health and traced the trajectories of their brain health.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Too often when veteran artists revisit career-defining hits late in life it's more of a marketing move than an artistic exploration. Not in this case. Since revealing two years ago that he's been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, the singer-guitarist and former TV show host released his well-received "Ghost on the Canvas" album and went on the road one last time for a farewell tour. Recently his family revealed that his disease has progressed to the point where he can no longer perform.
SCIENCE
July 17, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
The “senior moments” of unreliable memory may be a scientifically valid way to predict Alzheimer's disease, after all. Alzheimer's disease experts gathered at an international conference in Boston this week have a fancy name for that sense that your noggin' is just not ticking like the old days - subjective cognitive impairment. Studies in the last few years have been trying to bridge a divide between the anecdotal evidence of memory decline and objective, measureable signs, such as atrophy of certain brain regions evident through imaging devices, genetic anomalies on a cellular level, and other clinical tests.
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