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Amanda Susskind

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1993 | KURT PITZER
Signaling a new and less-trusting attitude among residents of the gated Hidden Hills community, the City Council is considering mandatory horse licensing in an attempt to reduce illegal boarding and the number of lawsuits against the city. The discussion comes partly as the result of a lawsuit against Hidden Hills by a woman who alleges she was bucked from a horse spooked by machinery on city land.
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NEWS
July 30, 1992 | JEFF KRAMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Malibu could reap a $2-million annual windfall--an amount equal to nearly one-third of its annual municipal budget--thanks to a new law expected to force county governments to allot a bigger chunk of property tax receipts to newly formed cities. The measure, signed into law Monday by Gov. Pete Wilson, clarifies the formula used to determine how much county governments are required to reimburse newly incorporated cities for the services cities take over from the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2006 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Concerned for the safety of their congregants during High Holy Days, more than 60 Jewish security chiefs gathered at the Anti-Defamation League's headquarters Wednesday to learn how to, as one of them put it, "harden our targets." It was the second such meeting sponsored this year by the ADL, which normally hosts just one annually. "With the situation in Israel becoming inflammatory this summer, we felt another security briefing was justified," ADL regional director Amanda Susskind said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1998 | SUE FOX
Since 1994, when Agoura Hills imposed a 4% utility tax on residents, the city has struggled with opposition to the tax. The city repealed the tax after voters rejected it in a 1996 special election and last year it refunded part of the money collected. Now, Agoura Hills faces a Superior Court lawsuit seeking $2.2 million in additional tax refunds, filed on behalf of 163 plaintiffs. Part of the dispute hinges on the interpretation of two court rulings after the tax was imposed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1998 | SUE FOX
Since 1994, when Agoura Hills imposed a 4% utility tax on residents, the city has struggled with opposition to the tax. The city repealed the tax after voters rejected it in a 1996 special election and last year it refunded part of the money collected. Now, Agoura Hills faces a Superior Court lawsuit seeking $2.2 million in additional tax refunds, filed on behalf of 163 plaintiffs. Part of the dispute hinges on the interpretation of two court rulings after the tax was imposed.
OPINION
June 1, 2005
Re "The Irresistible 'Nazi' Taboo," Commentary, May 27: We have never argued that there should be a taboo against using the terms "Nazi" and "Holocaust" in the public sphere, as Jonathan Chait suggests. Yet we have had to constantly remind our political, business and cultural leaders of the need for greater sensitivity and selectiveness when invoking the Holocaust and the Nazis. We believe that there is an appropriate time and place for recollecting the evils of Hitler and the important moral and historical lessons from that era. Although it is always somewhat risky to have any direct analogies to the uniqueness of the Holocaust, it is clearly appropriate and important when such horrific events as Bosnia, Rwanda and Darfur take place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2011 | By Michael Finnegan, Los Angeles Times
Police on Friday were searching for the suspect in a Santa Monica synagogue explosion that authorities had earlier believed to be an accidental blast. Santa Monica police released a photograph of the short and heavyset suspect, Ron Hirsch, 60, also known as Israel Fisher, saying they thought he was behind Thursday morning's blast outside Chabad House on 17th Street between Broadway and Santa Monica Boulevard. Police described Hirsch as a transient. "Hirsch should be considered extremely dangerous," said a police bulletin sent to other law enforcement agencies.
OPINION
October 19, 2012
Re "Debating free speech at Berkeley," Editorial, Oct. 15 Academic freedom and the right to free speech are sacred and deserve protection. At the same time, when anti-Israel activity crosses the line into anti-Semitism and expressions of support for terrorism, it is imperative to urge university officials to issue condemnations. There is a fundamental difference between criticizing Israel's government and its policies and "opposing" Israel's existence. The former may or may not be offensive speech.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2007 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
Jewish and Asian American leaders, whose communities represent nearly 20% of Los Angeles County's population, are trying to forge friendships in hopes of combating such chronic issues as racism and stereotyping.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2006 | Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writer
After an outcry by Jewish organizations, the Los Angeles teachers union revoked plans Thursday by one of its committees to hold a pro-Palestinian rally at union headquarters. The Human Rights Committee of United Teachers Los Angeles had announced it would be a co-host of the rally at UTLA headquarters a week from Saturday, and support a boycott against Israel. After meeting with committee members, union President A.J.
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