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BUSINESS
July 29, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Amazon.com Inc. is going on a hiring binge. The Seattle-based company said Monday it will immediately begin to fill more than 5,000 full-time warehouse jobs and about 2,000 customer service jobs. The positions are available at 17 distribution centers across the United States, including three so-called fulfillment centers in California: San Bernardino, Tracy and Patterson, the company said in a statement.  PHOTOS: Workers beware: Top cities with falling wages "We're hiring more than 5,000 people to join our team and help us continue to innovate and serve our customers,” said Dave Clark, vice president of worldwide operations and customer service at Amazon.
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BUSINESS
December 31, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
Amazon is apologizing for a prolonged disruption last week that affected Netflix and other companies that use the e-commerce giant's cloud-computing services. "We want to apologize," Amazon said in a statement posted on its website. "We know how critical our services are to our customers' businesses, and we know this disruption came at an inopportune time for some of our customers. We will do everything we can to learn from this event and use it to drive further improvement. " In its lengthy apology and summary of events, Seattle-based Amazon said that the service disruption began on Dec. 24 at an East Coast data center and affected its Elastic Load Balancing Service.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
What would you order from Amazon's new grocery project ? For some of us, it's almost an existential question. Just as millions of Americans have taken to food shopping as a form of recreation (witness the crowds at your neighborhood farmers market), along comes a plan that treats it as drudgery and promises to relieve you of the burden. Drudgery? Well, sure, in some cases. But which ones? I have to admit the first time I read about the program, my first thought was: “The Cheese Store of Beverly Hills delivered to my doorstep?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Amazon's TV "pilots" (see my previous post and this relevant website ) come in two flavors: grown up comedies, most of which betray basic-cable (and even premium-cable) values in terms of content and language, and children's shows, which, conversely, are largely aimed at the youngest of the young and contain a mandated educational component. We'll take the small-fry series first. They are meant to be realized in a number of forms -- animation, puppet animation, puppets, CGI and live-action -- but are presented for the most part as rough-sketch, storyboard-like "animatics," with each series containing a snippet or two of what the show would look like if it is fully produced.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
Want to work in one of Amazon's warehouses? What if the company paid for the cost of your higher education? The e-commerce giant on Monday announced its new Career Choice Program in a lengthy letter that was posted on Amazon's homepage. To reward its hourly workers and help them learn new skills, Amazon said it would offer a tuition reimbursement program, paying up to 95% of the tuition, textbook and associated fees for such courses as aircraft mechanics, computer-aided design, machine tool technologies and nursing.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
A best-selling British author has been caught red-handed slamming others' books on Amazon while praising his own under a number of pseudonyms. It was the assiduous work of Jeremy Duns, another writer, that laid out a case demonstrating that prize-winning mystery writer R.J. Ellory had been writing the "sock puppet" reviews on Amazon. Ellory has admitted to using the sock puppetry -- pseudonymous handles to post positive Amazon reviews of his own books and one-star reviews of others'.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The editors of the British website the Kernel bought a copy of the e-book "Naughty Daughter Abducted ... (taboo daddy daughter erotica)" on Amazon, and did not like what they saw. "The book is a sick rape fantasy with language and details too graphic for a family-friendly publication to reproduce," they wrote in a story about pornographic e-books being sold by the online retailer. In its heated report ("How Amazon Cashes in on Kindle Filth"), the Kernel found hundreds of e-books that include scenarios of rape, incest and "forced sex" with young girls -- findings that have led to an outcry in Britain . Here in the United States, the 1st Amendment protects some such works as free speech.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
A Seattle city review board has given the thumbs-up to an ambitious and unusual biodome design proposed by Amazon as part of its new downtown campus.  On Wednesday, Seattle's Design Review Board approved the design by architectural firm NBBJ. According to Geekwire , the architects persuaded the review board that the design would be "engaging and inviting to the public passing by. " Amazon is just one of many tech companies pursuing a distinctive new campus design. Apple's spaceship campus was just recently approved by the City Council of Cupertino, Calif.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2009 | Alex Pham
Most people think of Amazon.com Inc.'s Kindle as a slim piece of hardware the size of a very thin paperback book. In fact, Kindle is also a piece of software that displays digital books on any device Amazon chooses. On Thursday, the Seattle online retailing giant unveiled a Kindle version for computers. The application was part of Microsoft's Windows 7 operating system launch event Thursday in New York. Expected to be released in November, the program will also run on Microsoft's earlier operating systems, Windows XP and Windows Vista.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Amazon could start producing its own smartphone as soon as this year, according to a second report that claims the online retailer is working on a smartphone. The Seattle-based company along with suppliers in Asia are testing a smartphone, the report says, citing "people familiar with the situation. " The report also says Amazon might start production either this year or early 2013. Details are sketchy, but the new report, by the Wall Street Journal , says the device is expected to have a screen somewhere in the 4- to 5-inch range.
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