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Ambulances

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1998
If you end up with a life-threatening emergency in Manhattan Beach, it will cost a few extra dollars to get to the hospital in an ambulance. The City Council has increased advanced life support fees, which are charged to people who need to be transported to the hospital in a Fire Department ambulance. Officials approved the rate hike to prevent the city from absorbing prohibitive costs and to reflect what nearby cities are charging.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1993 | SARA CATANIA
Ventura County's three ambulance companies will ask the Board of Supervisors today to approve a fee hike that would increase the firms' revenues by 13%. Gold Coast, Ojai and Pruner ambulance companies are seeking to increase their per-trip rate for emergency transportation from $256 to $296.75, and non-emergency transportation from $193 to $240. The charge per mile from the scene to the hospital would increase from $9.90 to $10.75, and the fee for oxygen would jump from $30 to $45.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1998 | DEBRA CANO
The city next month will begin accepting proposals from companies seeking to provide ambulance service in Anaheim. Council members this week voted 4-1, with Councilman Bob Zemel dissenting, to reissue requests for proposals. The council suspended bidding in January, saying more review was needed. "Why shouldn't we be very careful and know all the answers?" asked Zemel, pointing out that the winner of the contract would be the largest private provider of a public safety service in the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1998
A city Fire Department ambulance stolen in the Westlake area early Monday was found crashed in the Hyde Park section of South Los Angeles, fire officials said. Shortly after midnight, paramedics went to the aid of a person having trouble breathing in the 900 block of South Lake Street. When they left the apartment, the ambulance was gone, said Los Angeles Fire Department spokesman Jim Wells. At 12:42 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2012 | By Robert J. Lopez, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles Fire Department plan to put six ambulances back in service to help improve lagging response times amounts to less than a "Band-Aid" fix to the agency's needs, a City Council member said. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa called for the ambulances to be restored to service last month after fire officials acknowledged that the time it takes rescuers to get to victims in medical emergencies had fallen below nationally accepted standards. Assistant Fire Chief David Yamahata on Monday told the council's Budget and Finance Committee that the six ambulances would begin operating Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2010 | By Maeve Reston
Facing a shrinking number of options to close a budget gap that could grow to $600 million in the next fiscal year, the Los Angeles City Council is weighing whether to deactivate 10 rescue ambulances at night. Council members postponed a decision Tuesday amid confusion about how the proposal would affect response times and after listening to the tearful testimony of a man whose father recently died of a heart attack. Fire officials had reluctantly advanced the cost-saving measure as part of their obligation to help reduce the city's budget gap. By reassigning 60 firefighters who staff the 10 ambulances with the fewest calls per day -- 3.5 on average -- budget officials said the city could save $3 million over the next few months and $20 million in the next fiscal year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1987
The Los Angeles city Fire Department has added five ambulances to its fleet of 49 to ensure prompt responses to emergency calls for paramedics, fire officials said. The new ambulances will operate during peak times, Thursday through Sunday, and mainly in the inner city. The move was designed to ensure emergency service during the busy holiday season, officials said.
NEWS
May 23, 1988 | United Press International
Ford Motor Co. plans to inspect ambulances to determine why at least nine have caught fire recently nationwide, officials said Sunday. A Ford spokesman said teams will inspect the cooling systems of Ford ambulances built from 1983 to 1987. Drivers smelled antifreeze before the ambulances caught fire in the three blazes that occurred in Missouri, the state chosen for the inspections, officials said. No one was injured in the fires.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | Associated Press
Federal regulators should recall 16,000 Ford ambulances because leaking radiator hoses tend to cause engine fires, the Center for Auto Safety said in a petition released Monday. The center, a consumer group, said it received four reports of fires during March and April in Ford Motor Co. E-350 ambulances manufactured from 1983 to 1987. The fires apparently were caused by leaking radiator coolant, the center said.
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