Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAmerasians
IN THE NEWS

Amerasians

NEWS
April 30, 1989 | GEORGE ESPER, Associated Press
The war was still raging that day 15 years ago when Vietnamese nuns heard the cries of a baby boy stuffed in a garbage can and took him inside their orphanage to raise. Today, Nguyen Thanh Binh, the son of a black American who went home and a Vietnamese mother who abandoned him, shares the plight of thousands of Amerasian youths languishing in the decay of Vietnam, desperately trying to get out and find their fathers. "My circumstances are miserable," says Lam Anh Hong, 18, whose mother gave her away to a relative.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1989 | J. KIRK FELSMAN and MARK C. JOHNSON, J. Kirk Felsman and Mark C. Johnson are clinical psychologists and assistant professors of psychiatry at Dartmouth Medical School. and
With the passage of the Amerasian Homecoming Act a year ago, Rep. Robert J. Mrazek (D-N.Y.) and Rep. Tom Ridge (R-Pa.), the bill's co-sponsors, stated that these half-American, half-Vietnamese youth "will have the opportunity to become (American) citizens and realize the dream that millions of others have pursued . . . ." Arrival in America should not be equated with the realization of that dream. Amerasians carry their own "dreams" about life in America.
NEWS
May 4, 1997 | SANG-HUN CHOE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After a decade of hesitation, Tommy's South Korean mother has decided to write to his American father to ask for help. She just doesn't know how to phrase it. Worn, haggard and suffering from arthritis, Kim Jong-bun digs out photos, a Social Security number and carefully folded letters: memorabilia of her amorous year with an American serviceman, an encounter that trapped her and their Amerasian son in limbo in a society that prizes racial purity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1994
The Amerasian Program at St. Anselm's Cross Cultural Community Center will hold a fund-raiser Friday to benefit children who were born to American fathers and Vietnamese mothers during the Vietnam War. The program offers services to children who grew up fatherless in a patrilineal society in Vietnam, where they often became victims of cultural shame and social harassment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1994 | DEBRA CANO
Wearing a white smock and plastic gloves to protect her hands, Oanh Vo squeezed a bottle of hair color on a customer's hair. At another booth in the salon, her husband, Thach Bui, with a pair of scissors in his right hand, a comb in the other, practiced by giving a doll a precision cut. Their dream is to open a beauty salon and become financially independent in this, their adopted country.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | ROBERT WOODWARD, REUTERS
John Rogers found the daughter he lost in 1973 asleep on the floor of a hut in Vung Tau on the coast of Vietnam south of Ho Chi Ming City. He had no doubt that she was the child he had named Gloria Jean shortly before leaving Vietnam for home. There are not many black Asian girls. Since finding his only child last year, the Honolulu travel agent has dedicated his life to helping Amerasians, the offspring of Vietnamese women and American servicemen born during the Vietnam War.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Vietnam has agreed in principle to an airlift to the United States of thousands of Amerasians who were fathered by Americans during the Vietnam War and left to lives of poverty and discrimination, two U.S. congressmen said Wednesday. Reps. Robert J. Mrazek (D-N.Y.) and Thomas J. Ridge (R-Pa.) said the agreement reached in Ho Chi Minh City this week "will result in a massive airlift of all Amerasian children from Vietnam," perhaps within two years.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across the fetid canal that separates the U.S. Navy base at Subic Bay from this famed liberty town, a broken one-room shanty with no electricity and eight occupants is a stark vision of America's mixed legacy in the Philippines. Roxanne and Melanie Hill, both former bar girls, are Amerasians, named for their American grandfather, a U.S. serviceman. The two sisters have different fathers, both U.S. servicemen. Roxanne has three children, each by different American servicemen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1985 | United Press International
Ninety-one children fathered by U.S. servicemen during the Vietnam War left Vietnam on Thursday on their first step to new homes in the United States. The children, accompanied by 146 Vietnamese relatives, arrived in Bangkok on a regularly scheduled Air France flight from Ho Chi Minh City.
NEWS
December 3, 1988 | United Press International
Vietnam and the United States have agreed to set up a processing center in Vietnam to speed the emigration of children fathered by Americans during the Vietnam War, a Vietnamese report said Friday. A Vietnamese News Agency dispatch received in Bangkok said U.S. and Vietnamese officials meeting in Hanoi last week agreed to set up the center. U.S. officials said the agreement had not yet been finalized. U.S. Embassy spokesman Ross Petzing quoted U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|