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American Aid

NEWS
August 23, 2000 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Driven down by a 4-year-old federal law and a booming national economy, the nation's welfare rolls have fallen to half the size they were in 1996, reaching their lowest level in decades, the White House announced Tuesday. Of the 1.6 million American parents still on public assistance, nearly one-third are now working--a threefold increase since the landmark welfare reform bill was signed by President Clinton on Aug. 22, 1996. All told, 6.
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NEWS
August 21, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mexican President-elect Vicente Fox arrives in Washington this week, he has every reason to expect a hero's welcome. After all, he just broke the legendary grip of the world's longest-ruling party with a landslide victory viewed around the world as a triumph for democracy. But while President Clinton can be expected to hail Fox publicly as a harbinger of change, in private conversations administration officials are noticeably more guarded about Mexico's incoming leader.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2000
Re "A Serious Case of Mistaken Identity," Commentary, June 22: Benjamin Schwarz makes some good points about American hubris and the oft-slighted Soviet role in World War II, but he is way off base even "possibly" crediting Josef Stalin with the victory. Stalin's partnership with Hitler started the war in the first place, and his self-serving actions and inexcusable negligence brought his country to the brink of disaster. Stalin was a monkey on the back of Soviet soldiers, who never knew when they or their families back home might be the next victims of one of the bloodthirsty dictator's murderous whims.
NEWS
December 25, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recent pre-millennial terrorist scares have forced U.S. authorities to walk a delicate tightrope--seeking to warn the public about potential danger without creating mass hysteria. Chastened by bitter reaction to the withholding of terror warnings to the flying public before the Pan Am 103 explosion a decade ago, the federal law enforcement community prefers to err on the side of overexposure--alerting the public to possible threats even if they are unsubstantiated and not necessarily "credible."
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Central America is back on the celebrity circuit, at least for the moment. Not since the region's civil wars ended early this decade have so many dignitaries planned stops at these tiny countries. They're bringing aid for victims of tropical storm Mitch, distributing used clothes and contributions for medicine and food donated by ordinary people.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | Times Wire Services
Far from the pressures of Washington and talk of her husband's impeachment, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton announced new American aid grants Sunday during a trip to promote women's rights. Although Sunday was the Clintons' 23rd wedding anniversary, the couple marked the occasion apart, having celebrated Friday with a dinner. In Bulgaria, she mentioned her husband just once in a 20-minute speech.
NEWS
February 16, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade before the current showdown over weapons of mass destruction, the United States turned a blind eye when Iraq used American intelligence for operations against Iran that made rampant use of chemical weapons and ballistic missiles, according to senior Clinton administration and former intelligence officials. The attacks against civilian and military targets during the Iran-Iraq War included some of the most pervasive uses of chemical weapons anywhere since World War I.
NEWS
September 29, 1997 | From Associated Press
A surprisingly high two-thirds of all Americans who are infected with the AIDS virus already know it, health officials reported Sunday. Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that 775,000 Americans carry HIV and at least 500,000 have been tested and know their status. The CDC research is the first careful attempt to arrive at this figure using infection data from the states.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In its seemingly endless spate of slip-ups and breakdowns, the crippled Mir space station ran out of power and began drifting Thursday when one of the exhausted crewmen accidentally pulled the plug on the navigation system. The mishap, which occurred during preparations for a perilous repair mission, plunged Mir into darkness and cut power to oxygen generators, climate control and communications. Mission Control Center officials blamed "human error."
NEWS
March 22, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Five U.N. aid workers were kidnapped at a regional airport in Somalia, according to U.N. spokesman Ahmed Fawzi, who declined to release the captives' names. He said four of the captives work for UNICEF and one works for the World Health Organization. Fawzi said the workers are from the United States, Britain, Nepal, India and Sudan. The kidnapping occurred at the air base in Balidogle, southwest of the capital, Mogadishu. U.N.
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