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MAGAZINE
March 14, 1993 | Michael D'Antonio, Michael d'Antonio's most recent article for the magazine was on Christian right and the GOP. His book, "Atomic Harvest," will be published this fall by Crown.
THE TOWERING BILLBOARDS ON INTERSTATE 95 ON THE South Florida coast sell a particular kind of dream to a particular kind of buyer. The dream comes true on lush golf courses and in sun-drenched villas. And the buyers, whose permanently smiling faces beam down from these signs, are old, but happy. The hair may be white, but the skin is tanned and smooth. The eyes sparkle with contentment. "Welcome to the club," says the larger-than-life couple on the sign advertising one retirement community.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2006 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
Elton John, Bill Cosby, the Pillsbury Doughboy and a NASCAR driving simulator are among the highlights at this year's AARP convention and expo, rolling into the Anaheim Convention Center today. About 25,000 graying baby boomers and other vintage humans are expected at the three-day event, which offers a curious blend of clinging to youth and preparing for death.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
Dennis Burgess never thought he would end up here, at a job re-entry program run by the American Assn. of Retired Persons. After all, he is only 44. But after he left his job as a program executive in charge of 39 television shows at ABC-TV in 1990 to pursue a writing career, the Reseda resident spent four years learning how hard it was to sell scripts from the other side of the table.
TRAVEL
July 9, 2006 | James Gilden, Special to The Times
"Gen AARP" as I like to call them -- have long had access to discounts at preferred travel providers. When my mother and I traveled to Amsterdam two years ago, I was able to book, at the Starwood website, an AARP rate room for her at the Sheraton Pulitzer Hotel. Her discounted rate was $183 per night at current exchange rates. My non-AARP rate was $80 more. Today, those big savings may be on the wane because AARP is discontinuing its members' ability to book directly with hotels.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2005 | Ronald Brownstein
As synonyms for the word "vile," my thesaurus offers some of the following: offensive, objectionable, odious, repulsive, repellent, repugnant, revolting, disgusting, sickening, loathsome, foul, nasty, contemptible, despicable and noxious. Any of those words would aptly describe the advertising attack launched last week against AARP, the largest advocacy group for seniors, by the conservative interest group USA Next. But there's one word that unfortunately can't be applied: surprising.
NATIONAL
March 23, 2005 | Peter Wallsten, Times Staff Writer
At the start of a potentially crucial congressional recess, in which lawmakers will hear from constituents about President Bush's plans to overhaul Social Security, Bush and his allies asked Democrats and AARP on Tuesday to stop attacking their ideas. Bush issued the plea alongside his onetime rival for the presidency Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), who has a better working relationship with Democrats than does the White House.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2002 | From Associated Press
The country's biggest health insurer has informed members of the senior citizens lobbying group AARP that it will reimburse them for prescriptions filled in Canada and elsewhere abroad. UnitedHealth Group Inc. sent a letter to the 97,000 people who purchased insurance with a drug benefit through AARP to tell them about the coverage.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1998 | From Washington Post
America's retirees are ill-prepared to evaluate the array of Medicare health insurance options that will be open to them in little more than a year, a new survey shows. Under legislation passed last year, seniors will have to decide whether to absorb the extra cost of staying in traditional Medicare plans--where they can go to any doctor they choose--or switch to one of a variety of new plans with more restrictions on care but lower overall costs.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2006 | From the Associated Press
AARP, a large advocacy group for seniors, has started selling three mutual funds geared toward retirement savings. The funds' portfolios range from conservative to aggressive and are designed to simplify investment choices for seniors, AARP said.
NEWS
August 12, 1994 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angry members of the American Assn. of Retired Persons flooded the organization's switchboards across the country Thursday, ranting against its endorsement of health care reform measures advocated by the Senate and House majority leaders. "They're all very emotionally upset, but they're all saying the same words," said John Warner, a spokesman for the AARP who fielded calls in the Long Beach office Thursday. "They say: 'I haven't been polled and you can't represent me.'
BUSINESS
April 25, 2006 | From the Associated Press
AARP, a large advocacy group for seniors, has started selling three mutual funds geared toward retirement savings. The funds' portfolios range from conservative to aggressive and are designed to simplify investment choices for seniors, AARP said.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2006 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
In late 2003, when the Bush administration was struggling to get its Medicare prescription drug program through Congress, a timely endorsement by AARP helped turn the tide in its favor. But the program has become more than just a legislative victory for the influential lobbying group and its pro-senior-citizen agenda. The private insurance plan carrying AARP's label is emerging as the leading choice of Medicare beneficiaries signing up for drug coverage. With at least 1.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2005 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
AARP urged its 3.1 million California members Wednesday to vote against Proposition 78, the pharmaceutical industry's proposed drug-discount program for poor residents. The group also endorsed Proposition 79, a competing ballot measure backed by consumer and labor organizations that would extend discounts to up to twice as many people and give the state the power to penalize drug companies that don't participate.
MAGAZINE
July 10, 2005 | Dan Neil
At 45, I am bracing for the indignities of aging. While I am today a magnificent beast, I know one day soon I won't be able to dance in public without someone calling paramedics. There will come a time when my butt is only a case number at the Bureau of Missing Keisters. Oh well. Considering the mileage, I'm philosophical. But must I read AARP magazine? Will I be spared nothing? Apparently not.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
A decision this week by AARP, the nation's largest seniors' lobby, to join in offering a prescription plan under the new Medicare drug benefit drew withering criticism Tuesday from a senior Democratic lawmaker. AARP's support was pivotal in securing congressional passage of the controversial Medicare overhaul, which included the drug benefit, in 2003.
NATIONAL
March 23, 2005 | Peter Wallsten, Times Staff Writer
At the start of a potentially crucial congressional recess, in which lawmakers will hear from constituents about President Bush's plans to overhaul Social Security, Bush and his allies asked Democrats and AARP on Tuesday to stop attacking their ideas. Bush issued the plea alongside his onetime rival for the presidency Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), who has a better working relationship with Democrats than does the White House.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The country's most powerful senior citizens group is calling on its 33 million members to swamp the White House with letters demanding that long-term care for the elderly and disabled be part of the President's health reform package. The White House considers the support of the American Assn. of Retired Persons crucial to selling its health reform plan, but it is wrestling with the enormous price of sheltering families from long-term health care costs.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A conservative group called USA Next has succeeded only in damaging its own reputation and interfering in the debate over Social Security with its virulent attacks on AARP, said Bill Novelli, chief executive of the seniors group, in Austin. "USA Next are not serious people. They're not engaged in the debate and should be ignored," Novelli said in a speech at the University of Texas.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2005 | Ronald Brownstein
As synonyms for the word "vile," my thesaurus offers some of the following: offensive, objectionable, odious, repulsive, repellent, repugnant, revolting, disgusting, sickening, loathsome, foul, nasty, contemptible, despicable and noxious. Any of those words would aptly describe the advertising attack launched last week against AARP, the largest advocacy group for seniors, by the conservative interest group USA Next. But there's one word that unfortunately can't be applied: surprising.
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