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NEWS
June 18, 1989 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Not long ago, a typical hotel banquet meal consisted of a fat-marbled cut of beef smothered in gravy, vegetables drenched in butter and gooey desserts piled high with whipped cream and chocolate sauce. And it wasn't unusual to find this kind of artery-choking menu at fund-raisers for organizations battling heart disease and cancer. But now groups such as the American Heart Assn. and the American Cancer Society realize that their reputations are at stake when they serve a meal to hundreds of supporters.
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SCIENCE
October 29, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Warning: Driving a truck for a living can be hazardous to your health - if you are diagnosed with prostate cancer, researchers said Tuesday. Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer diagnosed in men, and in most cases it's basically harmless. As the National Cancer Institute says, even patients who never get their tumors treated are likely to die of something other than prostate cancer. So, instead of looking at prostate cancer risk, the researchers who did the new study focused on the risk that the cancer would be aggressive at the time of diagnosis.
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NEWS
July 27, 2010
If you're in the unwelcome position of needing as much good information as possible about cancer treatments and support, take a look at the American Cancer Society's revamped website. The society hopes the changes it has made will make the site more user-friendly and helpful. The site should also prove useful for people who are interested in cancer prevention, as well as anyone who's interested in getting involved in helping people who are dealing with cancer.
NEWS
October 16, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Welcome to October, the official Breast Cancer Awareness Month - and the unofficial breast cancer marketing month. Pink is the new green, and we've seen what happens to that. Green-brag has found its way everywhere. The name for a secondary color has become a primary marketing tool - a badge that purportedly shows that some product or service is tender-minded when it comes to the environment, and therefore the compassionate customer who buys it is helping to save the Earth. “Green” isn't always what it seems, of course, and “greenwashing” is the neologism to bust bogus environmental-friendliness just as “AstroTurf roots” is for politics, describing a fake grass-roots movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1997 | RICHARD WARCHOL
The local American Cancer Society chapter is seeking volunteers to fill several positions in its Oxnard, Simi Valley, Thousand Oaks and Ventura offices. The society is seeking someone to coordinate and schedule office volunteers, a job that can be done from the home or office. It would require two to four hours each month. Volunteers are also sought to perform general office tasks, including labeling, word processing, data entry and greeting clients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1997 | TINA NGUYEN
The American Cancer Society warned Internet users about an online scam that claims the society will donate money to cancer research for every person who responds. Last November, an unknown user apparently began sending a chain letter that used a story about a 7-year-old girl dying of a brain tumor. It asked the recipients to forward the letter to as many people as possible.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | KATHRYN BOLD
Gourmet food, fine wine and great music--the key ingredients for a successful party--were all present in abundance at the South Coast Cancer League's "A Taste for Life." A sell-out crowd of 600 party-goers danced under a cluster of gold paper stars, sampled from among 140 wine selections and tasted gourmet offerings from 21 Orange County restaurants Sunday at the Robert Mondavi Wine & Food Center in Costa Mesa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1994
It's a safe bet that you're one of the more than eight out of every 10 adult Californians who do not smoke cigarettes. If that's so, perhaps you are also among those folks who used to take in a nightclub or a lounge after work or on weekend evenings every now and then. You went there to relax, meet friends and listen to a little live music. Perhaps those were the days when you weren't worried about secondhand smoke.
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | KATHRYN BOLD
More than 400 women, many dressed like the glamorous characters on the "Dynasty" TV series, paid tribute to the show's costume designer, Nolan Miller, at "A Taste of Fashion" benefit for the American Cancer Society/Orange County. Staged by the South Coast Cancer League, the recent fashion show and luncheon featured a nostalgic look at some of the opulent gowns Miller has created for Hollywood's leading ladies, as well as his new couture collection and spring styles from Saks Fifth Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Allan K. Jonas, a Los Angeles real estate developer and a longtime leader and volunteer with the American Cancer Society, the American Civil Liberties Union and other civic and political groups in Southern California, has died. He was 91. Jonas died Sunday at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica of complications from pneumonia, his son Tony Jonas said. A resident of Los Angeles since 1948, Allan Jonas built his real estate career in the 1950s when he began purchasing and constructing commercial properties near Los Angeles International Airport, which had just started to be used for commercial airline service.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
The American Cancer Society is looking for 120,000 volunteers for a long-term study, called Cancer Prevention Study 3 , that could help determine cancer risks for future generations. “Many cancer patients struggle to answer the question, 'What caused my cancer?' In many cases, we don't know the answer,” said Alpa V. Patel, the study's principal investigator. “CPS-3 will help us better understand what factors cause cancer, and once we know that, we can be better equipped to prevent cancer.” Earlier studies, CPS-1 and CPS-2, helped determine the links between smoking and cancer and weight and cancer, said Eric Beikmann, cancer society spokesman.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
It's been three years since the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force launched the mammography wars with its controversial recommendation that most women get fewer of the breast cancer screening exams -- one every other year between the ages of 50 and 74. Younger women could get tested if they wanted to. The recommendations were made after researchers tested 20 screening strategies using six diferent models of how breast cancer grows and...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Allan K. Jonas, a Los Angeles real estate developer and a longtime leader and volunteer with the American Cancer Society, the American Civil Liberties Union and other civic and political groups in Southern California, has died. He was 91. Jonas died Sunday at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica of complications from pneumonia, his son Tony Jonas said. A resident of Los Angeles since 1948, Allan Jonas built his real estate career in the 1950s when he began purchasing and constructing commercial properties near Los Angeles International Airport, which had just started to be used for commercial airline service.
SCIENCE
September 17, 2012 | By Eryn Brown
Cancer has become the leading cause of death among U.S. Latinos, nosing past heart disease in 2009, researchers at the American Cancer Society reported Monday. For most demographic groups - and for the country as a whole - heart disease is the top killer, claiming a total of 599,413 American lives in 2009, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That same year, the most recent year for which statistics are available, 567,628 Americans died of cancer. Among Latinos that year, the rankings were reversed: 29,935 died of cancer and 29,611 of heart disease, according to a study in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
Male pot smokers beware: Your seemingly harmless habit may be increasing your risk of developing the most dangerous forms of testicular cancer. A new study, published Monday on the website of the medical journal Cancer, reports that men who have testicular cancer are twice as likely to have smoked marijuana before they were diagnosed than control subjects. The association existed only for nonseminomas, the more dangerous form of testicular cancer that is harder to treat. In the study, carried out in Los Angeles, a team of researchers enrolled 163 men who had been diagnosed with testicular cancer between 1986 and 1991.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Kellie Pickler shaved her head this week in a sign of solidarity with a close childhood friend facing cancer, and to raise awareness about early prevention of the disease. But the country singer might not know how many other cancer patients were moved by her gesture. Cancer patients endure a particular kind of hell when they lose their hair, said Nancy Lumb of Chevy Chase, Md. For many -- especially women -- it's the single hardest part of their battle. Lumb should know. She never cried when she was diagnosed with breast cancer four years ago. She stayed strong when she had to tell her husband, her friends and her family about the diagnosis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1991 | SHAWN HUBLER and KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Concerned about pollution in Santa Monica Bay, Redondo Beach conservationists have taken on a new foe. It's small. It's yellow. And it just goes to show that one man's environmental menace can be another's bathtime pal. Rubber ducks--those cute, yellow tub toys--have become the focus of an ecological debate in the wake of a proposal by the coastal cities unit of the American Cancer Society to hold "Duck Derby" for charity near the Redondo Beach Pier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
French-born Veronique Peck, who was the widow of actor Gregory Peck and an ardent supporter of civic and cultural causes in her adopted country, died Friday of heart failure at her Los Angeles home, her family said. She was 80. As a young journalist, Veronique met Peck in 1953 when she interviewed him for a French newspaper. They were married on New Year's Eve 1955, soon after his divorce from his first wife was finalized. "I just participate in everything Greg does. I like it that way. I am not a career woman," Veronique told The Times in 1967 when the newspaper named her Woman of the Year.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has released new guidelines for prostate cancer screening - urging doctors not to use the popular PSA test to detect the disease. The new recommendations , which were published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine on Monday, hardly mark the first time public health officials have called the value of the blood test into question. The first concern is that the test doesn't actually save lives. The second is that it might cause harm because it ferrets out slow-growing cases of prostate cancer as well as aggressive ones -- leading many men with harmless cases to get unnecessary treatment.  Fighting prostate cancer can involve surgery or radiation, and can cause men distress, incontinence and sexual dysfunction, critics of overtreatment say.  But advice against screening can be difficult for physicians and patients to accept, said researchers who study how the public understands health risk.  Julie Downs, director of Carnegie Mellon University's Center for Risk Perception and Communication, said that patients often think of cancer the same way they think of infectious disease - as a toxin in the body that needs to be expunged, rather than cells gone awry that might best be left alone.
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