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OPINION
April 28, 2002 | JACK MILES, Jack Miles, senior advisor to the president of the J. Paul Getty Trust, is the author of "God: A Biography," and "Christ: A Crisis in the Life of God."
I am a born Roman Catholic who became an Episcopalian more than 20 years ago. I made the change in all sincerity, and yet in my heart I regard myself as a member of both churches at once, or, better, as "proleptically" (by anticipation) the loyal member of a Christian church that does not yet exist. In 1982, on the 20th anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council, I was one of a number of writers whom Commonweal asked to say how the council had changed them. My short answer was that it had made me a Protestant, but that answer concealed as much as it revealed.
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OPINION
March 26, 2014 | Doyle McManus
President Obama is scheduled to visit Pope Francis at the Vatican on Thursday, and the meeting will probably take the usual form of encounters between presidents and pontiffs: a polite conversation about their common agenda on poverty and world peace, plus a gentle remonstrance from the Holy Father on abortion and religious liberty. But if Obama and Francis had time to get to know each other, they might each benefit by trading notes on practical politics, as presidents and British prime ministers often do, and on the lessons they can draw from each other's experiences.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1997 | ANDREW GREELEY, Father Andrew Greeley is a novelist and professor of social science at the University of Chicago and the University of Arizona
Does the assignment of Francis E. George as archbishop of Chicago suggest that the Vatican is once again sending a message that there is no room for dissent in the Catholic Church and that the next generation of cardinals in this country will be at least as conservative as their predecessors?
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Michael McGough
There's a fair amount of snark online Monday about Jamie Coots , the Pentecostal pastor and reality-TV star who was fatally bitten by a snake he was handling in over-literal adherence to Luke 10:19. ("Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you.”) An atheist website offered this tasteless observation: “Pentecostal preachers are among the most poisonous creatures on Earth, but every once in while they bump into things even more venomous.” But even fellow Christians are finding fault with Coot for misinterpreting Scripture or presuming to test God. A friend of mine suggested that the biblical injunction that inspired Coot to handle a serpent should be properly read to mean that if a believer happens to come across a snake, God will step in, but that doesn't mean you should seek out the critters.
WORLD
February 11, 2003 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Keen to build support for military action against Iraq, the U.S. government is sponsoring a conservative American Catholic scholar's visit to Italy to challenge the Vatican's opposition to a war on moral grounds. Michael Novak, an author affiliated with the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, has been meeting with senior Vatican officials since his arrival in Rome last week and on Monday delivered a public lecture arguing that attacking Iraq now constitutes a "just war."
OPINION
December 24, 1989
I have been reading The Times for the last 11 years (ever since I came here from Mexico). I should cancel my subscription because of your pro-abortion views, but I like Al Martinez and Jack Smith too much and sometimes you have good articles like the column by Lord. Can somebody tell me please why all those American Catholics (including Lucy Killea) who do not agree with our Pope's teaching don't join a different religion? LEONOR CADWALLADER Burbank
OPINION
April 9, 2005
Re "Bernard Law Given Prominent Funeral Role," April 8: Few things could better illustrate the Vatican's political tone-deafness to the concerns of American Catholics than its selection of the disgraced former cardinal of Boston, Bernard Law, to celebrate a high-profile Mass honoring the pope. This is the same cardinal who chose to sacrifice the welfare of young boys to protect the church's reputation by reassigning pedophile priests to different parishes rather than turn them over to police.
NATIONAL
April 13, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
American Catholics said in a new survey that they were pleased with the leadership of Pope Benedict XVI, ahead of his visit to New York, the first in the U.S. since his election. The study found intense interest in faith among some young people. Yet few parishioners overall said they go to confession, and most believed they could be good Roman Catholics without going to Mass. The poll was commissioned by the nation's bishops and conducted in February by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University.
OPINION
July 5, 1987
In response to "Jewish Groups Seek Resolution of Issues Before Pope Meeting" (Letters, June 29). I am a Catholic who is greatly chagrined over Pope John Paul II's reception of Kurt Waldheim with full diplomatic protocol. It is important that Jewish leaders know that all Catholics are not in lock step with the Pope on this matter. Please understand this against the background of Pope John Paul's mounting problems with the thinking American church. American Catholics in general have a deep reverence for the Holocaust in the Jewish experience, and a deep abhorrence of its causes over the centuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1989
In the article a group known as Catholics for a Free Choice claimed that only 20% of American Catholics agreed with the bishops in their strong stand against abortion. Twenty percent? Where does this group get its figures? Clearly, the vast majority of Catholics are solidly against abortion. This was seen very dramatically in the last presidential election. Post-election polls revealed that ethnic Democrats (largely Irish, Italian and Polish Catholics) crossed over and voted for George Bush because of the abortion issue.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
The intersection of politics and religion can sometimes resemble one of those spaghetti freeway interchanges. Cars go in and cars go out, but not always in ways you might expect. Take the recent case of the fight between President Obama and the nation's Roman Catholic bishops. A new poll has found that Catholics who are familiar with the issue tend to side overwhelmingly with the bishops. That is, they agree that the Obama administration is threatening their religious liberty by mandating that some church-affiliated institutions, such as schools and hospitals, provide free contraceptive services to their employees, in violation of church teachings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2010
Thomas W. Ludlow Ashley Ohio congressman fought poverty Thomas W. Ludlow Ashley, 87, a former Ohio congressman who spent 26 years in Washington and was a strong advocate for public housing, died Tuesday of melanoma at his home in Leland, Mich. A Democrat known as "Lud," Ashley represented the Toledo, Ohio, area for 13 terms in the U.S. House from 1955 to 1981 and put a priority on fighting poverty in urban areas. Ashley's great-grandfather, James Ashley, served in Congress from 1859 to 1869 as a Republican and helped shape the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery.
NATIONAL
April 13, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
American Catholics said in a new survey that they were pleased with the leadership of Pope Benedict XVI, ahead of his visit to New York, the first in the U.S. since his election. The study found intense interest in faith among some young people. Yet few parishioners overall said they go to confession, and most believed they could be good Roman Catholics without going to Mass. The poll was commissioned by the nation's bishops and conducted in February by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2006 | Garrett Therolf, Times Staff Writer
In an event that mixed moments of sadness and exuberance, Roman Catholic members of the Vietnamese American community gathered Sunday to remember the difficult origins of their faith and celebrate their current triumphs. Nearly 5,000 people arrived at the UC Irvine Bren Events Center for the annual Mass celebrating the Vietnamese martyrs. The 117 martyrs, canonized by Pope John Paul II in 1988, were killed during the persecution of Catholics in Vietnam from 1798 until 1861.
OPINION
May 14, 2005
Michael McGough's commentary ("Grappling With Catholic Feng Shui," May 9) is the latest version of what's become a treasured fairy tale among conservative Catholics: that all the troubles and challenges confronting the church can be blamed on the openness of Vatican II. In this little bit of make-believe, Catholics worldwide were frightened by the scary forest of freedoms that evolved from that period -- so we all left the church and now drift helplessly,...
OPINION
April 21, 2005
It became clear shortly after Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger was chosen that liberals and some in the media decided that it would be politically incorrect to like the new pope. I'm so glad that the Holy Spirit did not consult them before dispensing his infinite wisdom upon the College of Cardinals. Benedict XVI is a brilliant, prayerful and humble man who will surprise many people during his papacy. Long may he reign. Michael Marasco Glendale I'd like to think I'm not the only American Catholic who watched the election of a successor to Pope John Paul II hoping the church's new leader would be someone able and willing to guide its faithful in a direction more closely aligned to Jesus' message of forgiveness, compassion and redemption for all. Disappointingly (but hardly surprising)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1988
The combination of Maloney's cranky, repetitive whining and the cartoon (with the Pope saying "I miss Krakow") that was placed with her article really strains one's practice of charity. When will it be learned that there are no such persons as "American" Catholics nor is there a "U.S." Catholic Church. There are Catholics who struggle to imitate the Christ within his church and there are those who struggle mightily to subvert the magisterium for their own ego-bloated, strident concerns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1989
I have been avidly following your coverage of the recent talks of American Catholic bishops with the Pope and the Roman Curia. In it I seemed to gather that the focus of it all was supposed to be the evangelization of the average man or woman in the U.S. However, it seems to be that Rome's attack on American Catholics as being pickers and choosers, if pursued with any intensity or vigor, could well bring instead the de-evangelization of our...
WORLD
April 20, 2005 | Teresa Watanabe, William Lobdell and Wendy Thermos, Times Staff Writers
When Father Marcos Gonzalez of St. Andrew's Church in Pasadena heard that Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger had been elected the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church, he let out a whoop of joy. The new Pope Benedict XVI, he thought, would be sure to proclaim and defend traditional teachings. When Sister Jeannine Gramick, co-founder of a Maryland-based Catholic ministry to promote the rights of gay men and lesbians, heard the news, her heart fell.
OPINION
April 9, 2005
Re "Bernard Law Given Prominent Funeral Role," April 8: Few things could better illustrate the Vatican's political tone-deafness to the concerns of American Catholics than its selection of the disgraced former cardinal of Boston, Bernard Law, to celebrate a high-profile Mass honoring the pope. This is the same cardinal who chose to sacrifice the welfare of young boys to protect the church's reputation by reassigning pedophile priests to different parishes rather than turn them over to police.
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