Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAmerican Cheese
IN THE NEWS

American Cheese

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
December 2, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How's this for culinary chutzpah? An upstart cheese maker from the United States flies into Italy to hawk his New York wares in the motherland of mozzarella, Parmesan, provolone and ricotta. Jonathan White's business card brashly proclaims his ambition: "setting back the dairy industry 100 years." He wants to show Americans, and anybody else who needs a demonstration, that there's plenty more to cheese than a gummy processed slice stuck on top of a hamburger patty.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Sascha Lyon is executive chef of both French-Mediterranean restaurant Delphine at the W Hotel in Hollywood and southern Italian-inflected Soleto downtown. Lyon moved to California after working for 17 years in New York at restaurants such as Daniel, Pastis and Balthazar, as well as his own restaurant, Sascha. At Delphine, he focuses on breezy seafood dishes. At Soleto, which opened in the financial district in the former Zucca space, Lyon's Italian menu is rustic and straightforward: meatballs marinara al forno, pizzas with tomatoes and goat cheese or bacon and potato, homey pastas and secondi such as pan-seared scallops, roasted chicken and dry-aged New York steak.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Sascha Lyon is executive chef of both French-Mediterranean restaurant Delphine at the W Hotel in Hollywood and southern Italian-inflected Soleto downtown. Lyon moved to California after working for 17 years in New York at restaurants such as Daniel, Pastis and Balthazar, as well as his own restaurant, Sascha. At Delphine, he focuses on breezy seafood dishes. At Soleto, which opened in the financial district in the former Zucca space, Lyon's Italian menu is rustic and straightforward: meatballs marinara al forno, pizzas with tomatoes and goat cheese or bacon and potato, homey pastas and secondi such as pan-seared scallops, roasted chicken and dry-aged New York steak.
FOOD
July 1, 2010 | By Jenn Garbee, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jim Brown pauses during his singsong sales pitch at Whole Foods in Venice just long enough to replenish samples of his namesake tomato-based hamburger relish. "You've got to use more cream cheese than cracker so you can take the relish to almost overflowing," he explains, swiping the bottom of a wheat cracker with a layer of cream cheese. He turns the cheese spreader upright, and then carefully builds a half-inch white wall on adjacent sides of the cracker to form a two-sided repository for the tangy condiment.
FOOD
July 1, 2010 | By Jenn Garbee, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jim Brown pauses during his singsong sales pitch at Whole Foods in Venice just long enough to replenish samples of his namesake tomato-based hamburger relish. "You've got to use more cream cheese than cracker so you can take the relish to almost overflowing," he explains, swiping the bottom of a wheat cracker with a layer of cream cheese. He turns the cheese spreader upright, and then carefully builds a half-inch white wall on adjacent sides of the cracker to form a two-sided repository for the tangy condiment.
NEWS
March 7, 2002 | Jessica Strand
It's two classic sandwiches in one--grilled cheese and tuna. Broadway Deli: This version mixes albacore tuna with celery, chives, tarragon, mayonnaise and chopped egg whites. It comes on wheat, rye or sourdough, grilled until the cheese--Swiss, Jack or cheddar--is running down the sides. You get French fries on the side. (Tuna melt, $9.25.) Broadway Deli, 1457 Third St. Promenade, Santa Monica (310) 451-0616. Victor's Restaurant: Here's a high-quality old-fashioned tuna melt: line-caught albacore, chopped eggs, mayonnaise, celery and onions.
FOOD
July 19, 2000 | RUSS PARSONS
There are some things that cannot be improved on. Invariably, they are the simplest. A glass of wine. A loaf of bread. A peach. A piece of cheese. As a cook, you can add things to them, but you should be ever-mindful that all you're doing is ornamentation. That's kind of a backhanded way of introducing two new books that are worthy of attention. Both Laura Werlin's "New American Cheese" (Stewart, Tabori and Chang, $35) and Janet Fletcher's "The Cheese Course" (Chronicle Books, $19.
FOOD
September 23, 2009 | C. Thi Nguyen
Anybody who grew up in the United States will tell you: For a certain kind of grilled cheese sandwich, it's got to be American cheese -- the kind that normally comes in individually wrapped slices. A good farmhouse cheddar is all wrong; high-quality cheese melts into particles and lumps, and just plain has too much substance. Only a cheap cheese, like American, will properly collapse into velvety goop. Philly cheese steaks are the same deal, and the folks at Philly West Bar & Grill in West Los Angeles get it. They know their steaks and they know their cheese, and their cheese steaks have just the right balance between meaty and gooey -- tender sliced rib-eye, browned onions, all bound together by liquefied white American cheese.
NEWS
February 5, 1985
A Compton hamburger stand that allegedly had a policy of holding the wrong cheese was raided by Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies early today. The deputies said they took 5,180 pounds of stolen government surplus cheese to go as well as three purloined electric typewriters on their 2 a.m. visit to Marathon Hamburgers in the 600 block of East Compton Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1985
Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputies said they confiscated 5,180 pounds of stolen government surplus cheese, as well as three allegedly purloined electric typewriters Tuesday during a 2 a.m. raid at the Marathon Hamburgers stand in the 600 block of East Compton Boulevard in Compton. They also arrested the husband and wife owners, Stephanos and Maria Tsimahidis, on suspicion of receiving stolen property.
FOOD
September 23, 2009 | C. Thi Nguyen
Anybody who grew up in the United States will tell you: For a certain kind of grilled cheese sandwich, it's got to be American cheese -- the kind that normally comes in individually wrapped slices. A good farmhouse cheddar is all wrong; high-quality cheese melts into particles and lumps, and just plain has too much substance. Only a cheap cheese, like American, will properly collapse into velvety goop. Philly cheese steaks are the same deal, and the folks at Philly West Bar & Grill in West Los Angeles get it. They know their steaks and they know their cheese, and their cheese steaks have just the right balance between meaty and gooey -- tender sliced rib-eye, browned onions, all bound together by liquefied white American cheese.
FOOD
November 26, 2008 | Betty Hallock, Hallock is a Times staff writer.
Why isn't cheese a bigger player in the Thanksgiving meal (other than the fact that there probably wasn't much of it in 17th century Plymouth)? Thanksgiving is the perfect opportunity to serve cheese, for reasons both lofty and practical. The lofty reason is seasonality, because this is arguably the best time of year for cheese. And the practical reason is convenience, because cheese doesn't require an oven. Sure, in many ways, cheese is easy -- that's the point.
FOOD
November 29, 2006
Total time: 20 minutes Servings: 6 to 8 Note: Mascarpone from Cantaré Foods is widely available at supermarkets including Whole Foods, Gelsons, Vons, Albertsons and Ralphs. Rogue Creamery Smokey Blue cheese and Vella Dry Jack are available at Auntie Em's Kitchen in Eagle Rock, the Cheese Store of Beverly Hills, the Cheese Store of Silver Lake and select Whole Foods markets. Kosher salt 1 pound penne or penne rigate 4 ounces crumbled blue cheese, preferably Rogue Creamery Smokey Blue 1 cup grated Monterey Jack 1/2 cup fresh mascarpone 4 ounces California goat cheese 1/2 cup heavy cream Pinch cayenne 2 tablespoons butter Freshly ground white pepper to taste 1/2 to 3/4 cup grated Vella Dry Jack 1. Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil with salt (about 1 tablespoon for every 2 quarts of water)
SPORTS
February 18, 2006 | J.A. Adande
There's no place in the world where you can escape American style. Not even here, former home of an enormous Fiat factory, down the road from the Italian fashion houses of Milan. You hear it in the disco and hip-hop music pumping through the speakers, you see it in the overly tanned cheerleaders popping up at various venues or the Hollywood movies at the cinema museum.
FOOD
August 6, 2003 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
We came to judge cheese. We expected a lot of cheese. Last year, the competition of the American Cheese Society attracted more than 400 entries. On our arrival at the Golden Gateway Holiday Inn for this year's contest, we were led to a secret location in the basement, where we were surrounded by truckles, pyramids, tubs, logs, slabs and pucks. Over in the corner awaited luggage racks laden with 40-pound blocks. This year, there were 616 cheeses, 22 of us and two days to taste them all.
FOOD
February 12, 2003
Dear SOS: I attended Fries Avenue School in Wilmington in the early 1940s. The cafeteria served a tamale pie that I liked very much. It was different from today's tamale pies because there was not a corn bread crust on top. The cornmeal was mixed in with the rest of the ingredients and there was just the slight- est skin-like membrane instead of a crust. D.E. Miller Corona del Mar Dear D.E.: This recipe from our files sounds similar to the one you are looking for, as the cornmeal is mixed into the casserole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1989
By putting retaliatory tariffs on Common Market food imports, the Reagan Administration has called to public attention the fact that all American beef animals are treated with hormones (Part I, Dec. 28). Since these growth hormones are so dangerous for Olympic and teen-age athletes, my family doesn't want to ingest any of them--even second hand. We already know from reading The Times that the pollution in Santa Monica Bay has contaminated the fish and that much poultry contains poisonous salmonella.
NEWS
March 21, 1985 | STEVEN R. CHURM
Low-income residents and people 55 or over are eligible to receive five pounds each of federal surplus cheese and butter March 28 at various distribution sites in nine southeast Los Angeles County cities. To qualify, residents must be unemployed and at least 55 or earn less than the federal poverty level. Under the program's guidelines, the poverty level is an annual income of $6,474 for a single person, $8,736 for a couple, $10,998 for a family of three and $13,260 for a family of four.
NEWS
August 23, 2002 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventy-five years later, at least one mystery remains: the identity of the original Lady in Black, who arrived each year on Aug. 23 at 12:10 p.m.--her face obscured by a veil--to silently lay roses at Rudolph Valentino's crypt.
NEWS
March 7, 2002 | Jessica Strand
It's two classic sandwiches in one--grilled cheese and tuna. Broadway Deli: This version mixes albacore tuna with celery, chives, tarragon, mayonnaise and chopped egg whites. It comes on wheat, rye or sourdough, grilled until the cheese--Swiss, Jack or cheddar--is running down the sides. You get French fries on the side. (Tuna melt, $9.25.) Broadway Deli, 1457 Third St. Promenade, Santa Monica (310) 451-0616. Victor's Restaurant: Here's a high-quality old-fashioned tuna melt: line-caught albacore, chopped eggs, mayonnaise, celery and onions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|