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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2006
I must beg to differ with Peter Ranier's comment that "no other American director made more masterpieces than Robert Altman or took more chances as an artist" ["A Risk-Taker's Legacy: Many Masterpieces," Nov. 22]. Ironically, it's online next to an ad for the man who made the most American masterpieces: John Ford. Then there's Frank Capra, Howard Hawks and, more recently, Martin Scorsese. I'm sure there's more to add, but some of us don't hold Altman as the best of the best. JENNY LENS Santa Monica
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Susan King
The 29th Santa Barbara International Film Festival announced Tuesday that Robert Redford will receive the American Riviera Award at a tribute Feb. 7 at the Arlington Theatre. The festival takes place Jan. 30 through Feb. 9. Redford, 77, has starred in such classic films as 1969's "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," 1973's "The Sting" and "The Way We Were" and won a best director Oscar for his debut feature as a filmmaker, 1980's "Ordinary People. " Redford also changed the landscape of independent cinema, establishing Sundance Institute and the Sundance Film Festival.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1995 | Donald Liebenson, Donald Liebenson is a Chicago-based free-lancer who writes about home video. and
Lurid, scandalous sex, true-crime melodrama and emotional propaganda have long been staples of American film. Just how long can be found in Kino on Video's "First American Features," a revelatory five-volume collection available Aug. 29. Spanning the years 1912-1916, Kino's follow-up to its best-selling "The Movies Begin" collection fills in a missing chapter in cinema history, says David Shepard, owner of Sun Valley-based Film Preservation Associates, which has licensed the films to Kino.
HOME & GARDEN
May 11, 2013 | Chris Erskine
What's to live for? The price of wine continues to skyrocket, and Warren Buffett is now tweeting. What's next for us culturally? Bingo night at the Louvre? Meanwhile, the criminal justice system insists on hammering on poor Lindsay Lohan. It's only a matter of time before her work suffers, and then who takes over as the freckled queen of American cinema? Leonardo DiCaprio? That's the obvious answer. Yes, I have issues with him as Gatsby, but more on that in a moment. For now, I'll tell you what's to live for. Summer, that's what.
BOOKS
May 5, 1991 | Michael Wilmington, Wilmington covers film for The Times and is co-author of "John Ford" (Da Capo Press)
Few stories of the past century are more epochal, more exciting and more crucial to understanding our culture than the history of the movies--or motion pictures, film, cinema, whatever you want to call them. The story of their rise, documented in these three initial volumes of Scribner's proposed 10-volume history, seems, on the surface, pure Horatio Alger: humble beginnings, great advancement. Beginning around the century's turn, in peep shows and nickelodeon screenings, films were, initially, cheap entertainment for the masses, particularly the poorer classes of the great American cities.
NEWS
March 12, 1995
What can PBS expect from Congress when it wastes its efforts on the obsequies of an American cinema that has been quite dead for some time now? (PBS' 10-part "American Cinema" began Jan. 22 and ended Feb. 27.) C. Mulrooney, Los Angeles
OPINION
February 19, 2007
Re "A more worldly Oscar," editorial, Feb. 7 This editorial said: "Protectionist France may want to reserve its top Cesar [Award] for the best of French cinema." The term "protectionist" surprised and saddened me. Inspired by the Oscars, the Cesars were created mainly to honor the best French films, just as the Oscars honor the American cinema. Like the Oscars, the Cesars have a Best Foreign Film category. In 2007, three American films were among the five nominated in this category.
NEWS
January 22, 1995 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PBS' 10-part series "American Cinema," kicking off Monday, focuses on the three M's of the movies: the method, the meaning and the magic. Produced by the New York Center for Visual Art, KCET and the BBC, "American Cinema" is not a typical clip anthology but a serious study of American filmmaking over the last 100 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Loosen your seat belts. You're going to have some smooth nights. A panoramic 10 hours in the round, the new PBS documentary series "American Cinema" is a sprawling cineplex of lip-smacking celluloid pleasures, a middle-brow homage to U.S. filmmaking that manages to celebrate without whitewashing, to entertain mostly without pandering and to instruct without lecturing like a dry academic. In other words, it's great fun.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1997
Like a guest at a party who tells the host of the splendid view he might have if he would only widen the arch above the window, it often takes an outsider, as is the case with Billy Wilder, to see things from a clear and undiminished perspective ("The Artful Emigre," by Suzanne Muchnic, Feb. 16). Along with fellow emigres Robert Siodmak, Otto Preminger, Fred Zinnemann and Fritz Lang, Wilder is rightly regarded as one of the fathers of film noir, one of the most important--and imitated--movements in the American cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2013 | By Susan King
 William Goldenberg won the American Cinema Editors 63rd ACE Eddie Award for best edited dramatic feature film Saturday evening for the Oscar frontrunner "Argo. " Ben Affleck's drama about the rescue of six Americans hiding in Tehran during the Iranian Revolution has already won the Golden Globe, the BAFTA, the Screen Actors Guild Award, the Producers Guild Award, the Directors Guild of America Award and the Scripter Award. Meanwhile, Jay Cassidy and Crispin Struthers won best edited comedy/musical feature film for the quirky romantic comedy "Silver Linings Playbook," which is up for eight Academy Awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
HONG KONG - A few days ago, an art professor from northern China named Li Xu was in a small Beijing gallery in the shadow of Tiananmen Square explaining the unlikely inspiration for one of his paintings: the $2.7-billion blockbuster "Avatar. " After the 34-year-old finally caught the film last year (it first opened in China in early 2010), Li wanted to see if he could marry the serenity he felt infused "Avatar"with the aesthetic of traditional Chinese painting, his primary medium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Robert Sklar, a film scholar known for bringing the insights of the social historian to understanding the history of American film, has died. He was 74. Sklar, who also was one of the original Rotisserie League fantasy baseball "owners" in the 1980s, died in Barcelona, Spain, July 2 after suffering head injuries in a bicycling accident, said Richard Allen, professor and chair of cinema studies at New York University. A professor in the department of cinema studies at New York University from 1977 until his retirement in 2009, Sklar was the author of books that included "City Boys: Cagney, Bogart, Garfield" (1992)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Blake Edwards has been the guiding force on such comedic classics as 1959's "Operation Petticoat" and 1961's "Breakfast at Tiffany's," not to mention the "Pink Panther" films with Peter Sellers as the bumbling Inspector Clouseau. On Thursday, Edwards will be on hand to talk about his career at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Samuel Goldwyn Theater. A screening of his 1981 Hollywood satire, "S.O.B.," starring Edwards' wife, Julie Andrews, and William Holden in his final film, will follow the discussion.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2010 | By Susan King
"The Hurt Locker" and "The Hangover" shared the limelight at the American Cinema Editors' 60th annual ACE Eddie Awards on Sunday evening. Bob Murawski and Chris Innis won for "The Hurt Locker" in the drama category, while Debra Neil-Fischer of "The Hangover" was honored for the best-edited comedy or musical film. The awards were handed out Sunday night at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. Other film editors picking up awards were Kevin Nolting in the animation category for "Up" and Geoffrey Richman in the documentary category for "The Cove."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2009
Re Kenneth Turan's review of the movie "Public Enemies" ["Gangster Chic, July 1]: Turan describes it as "an impressive film of great formal skill . . . an art film" with "a brooding dark-of-the-soul quality," with director Michael Mann being "one of the masters of modern American cinema," "a restless soul, a striver, pushing his work toward . . . the recapturing and recasting of reality."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2009
Re Kenneth Turan's review of the movie "Public Enemies" ["Gangster Chic, July 1]: Turan describes it as "an impressive film of great formal skill . . . an art film" with "a brooding dark-of-the-soul quality," with director Michael Mann being "one of the masters of modern American cinema," "a restless soul, a striver, pushing his work toward . . . the recapturing and recasting of reality."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1987
Who made the money? After reading your July 26 Calendar story on agents ("Power Players," by Paul Rosenfield and Michael Cieply), I had to figure somebody was paid off. Not only did you allot prominent space to a story that maybe 1% of your readership cares about, Rosenfeld and Cieply didn't even bother to go into any depth on the subject. The article failed to conclude that the power and influence that agents seem to hold over the film-making community is primarily responsible for the degeneration and decay of the quality of our American cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2009 | Dennis Lim
Reviewing one of Sidney Poitier's films in the late '60s, the New York Times critic Vincent Canby noted that the actor "does not make movies, he makes milestones." Canby's point, which was not entirely a compliment, holds even truer today.
OPINION
February 19, 2007
Re "A more worldly Oscar," editorial, Feb. 7 This editorial said: "Protectionist France may want to reserve its top Cesar [Award] for the best of French cinema." The term "protectionist" surprised and saddened me. Inspired by the Oscars, the Cesars were created mainly to honor the best French films, just as the Oscars honor the American cinema. Like the Oscars, the Cesars have a Best Foreign Film category. In 2007, three American films were among the five nominated in this category.
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