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OPINION
October 2, 2007 | Jonah Goldberg
In a recent speech at the National Press Club, Katie Couric expressed somber disapproval of the jingoistic excesses after 9/11. Among the things that vexed her: "The whole culture of wearing flags on our lapel and saying 'we' when referring to the United States. " From what I can tell, nobody among the journalistic swells bothered to ask, "Who isn't 'we,' Kemo Sabe?" I don't want to revisit those supposedly Orwellian flag pins, which sat so heavily on so many journalistic lapels.
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OPINION
December 3, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Proficiat Postaliosa! If Harry Potter commemorative stamps can cast a solvency spell on the U.S. Postal Service, that's some magic we can get behind. Tradition-bound philatelists should back off from their complaints. The stamps, depicting scenes from the movies based on J.K. Rowling's books , went on sale in late November despite vehement opposition from some serious stamp collectors, who objected that they were both un-American and crassly commercial. Michael Baadke, the editor of Linn's Stamp News, summarized the collectors' arguments when he wrote that Harry Potter postage was "dismissing significant established U.S. stamp traditions without explanation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
How should popular culture deal with a tragedy in which nearly 3,000 people lost their lives in a space of time equivalent to an average-length feature film? Judging by the evidence of how our culture has processed the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks over the last decade, one way is to deal with it indirectly and elliptically rather than steering head-first into the maelstrom of thoughts and feelings that continue to swirl around that terrible day. Looking back at some prominent Sept.
NEWS
November 26, 2013 | By Susan Rohwer, guest blogger
This week, schoolchildren across the country will come home from elementary and preschool armed with cutout paper turkeys and stories excitedly recounted about the first Thanksgiving, all those years ago in Plymouth, Mass. At school, most will learn the traditional narrative of hungry Pilgrims aided by friendly Native Americans, who shared their bounty with their less-fortunate immigrant neighbors. But while this heartwarming story may be historically accurate, what happens next to these 17th century Native Americans and their descendants is usually left out of the classroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2010 | By Peter Terzian
Hot Stuff Disco and the Remaking of American Culture Alice Echols W.W. Norton: 338 pp., $26.95 Recently, I attended a wedding reception during which a 10-year-old boy, to entertain the adults on the dance floor, started making the point-to-the-sky motion that John Travolta patented in 1977's "Saturday Night Fever." Why was I surprised? I doubt the tiny dancer even saw the movie, but he needn't have. Thirty years after its heyday, disco has so thoroughly saturated global popular culture that its songs and signifiers are recognizable to children born in a different century.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
Folklife specialist David Taylor was in the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress sorting through photographs he had taken of Italian-Americans in San Pedro, Calif. "This one shows a statue of the Virgin Mary cradling a fishing boat in Mary Star of the Sea Catholic Church, the parish of many Italian-American families," Taylor told Alan Jabbour, Folklife Center director. "San Pedro residents call Mary Star of the Sea the church fishermen-built," said Taylor.
NEWS
May 18, 1996
Anthony DeRiggi, 79, contractor and educator who promoted Italian American culture. Born to Neopolitan immigrants in Pittsburgh, he was educated at the University of Naples, Duquesne University and USC. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Army as a translator for Italian prisoners of war. In the 1950s, DeRiggi built custom homes in the Hollywood Hills and began teaching social studies at Hollywood High School, where he was president of the faculty association.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1990 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were times this month when Japanese tour leader Kyoko Oyama felt that the direction things were going was from bad to worse, rather than eastward from Tokyo to Los Angeles. Oyama operates a small English language school in Japan and, for the last three summers, has escorted students to Los Angeles to stay in local homes. The idea is for the youngsters to absorb English by soaking up American culture.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | DANA PARSONS, Times Staff Writer
It was a gray, drizzly Saturday afternoon and Fereshte Tajadode was waiting for her daughter's Farsi language class to end. "She'd prefer to be out with her school friends, doing fun things," Tajadode said. "But she's starting to adjust and not resent this so much." The 60-minute class over, Sara got up from the table and headed for the door.
SPORTS
July 8, 1994 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oleg Tverdovsky's adjustment to the NHL began Thursday when he donned a Mighty Ducks cap and stepped to a podium to address reporters in a thick Ukrainian accent. "Hello, I am Oleg Tverdovsky," he said. "I am very happy to be here in California." Tverdovsky, the defenseman taken second overall by the Ducks in last week's NHL draft, then got an assist from an interpreter as he fielded questions about his expectations as a pro player. "It is going to be unusual and strange to me," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The writer Albert Murray, a maverick intellectual who challenged widespread assumptions about U.S. and African American culture, has died in New York City at age 97. Murray, a novelist as well as essayist and literary and music critic, wrote more than a dozen books, beginning in 1970s with the seminal “The Omni-Americans: Black Experience and American Culture,” which posed a searing critique of both black separatism and white establishment ideas...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2013 | From Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
After Philip Slater published "The Pursuit of Loneliness," a 1970 best-seller that delivered a blistering critique of American culture, he moved to California and adopted a lifestyle aimed at avoiding the fate of the fellow citizens he saw as so unhappy. "Pursuit" argued that despite widespread influence and prosperity Americans were overwhelmingly dissatisfied. A key reason for that, he said, was a collective obsession with the success of the individual. The book established him as a social critic and set up a future for Slater as an academic.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Jasmine Elist
In his new memoir, “Fresh Off the Boat” (Spiegel & Grau, $26), Eddie Huang describes life as a first-generation American determined to hold onto his Taiwanese culture. The 30-year-old chef and proprietor of Baohaus, a New York City hangout serving Taiwanese street food, reveals the crucial role food played in not only determining Huang's career but also in establishing his relationship with  his family, his community and American and Taiwanese cultures.   A self-proclaimed weirdo, Huang graduated from law school and also worked as a stand-up comedian and pot dealer.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Jon Healey
It would be silly to try to reduce the American character -- if there even is such a thing -- to a single graph. But the one pictured above, taken from a report released Wednesday by the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine, does a pretty good job conveying the truth behind one of the developed world's favorite stereotypes of the United States. We are, indeed, far more prone to lethal violence than any other country in the developed world. Why? The report wasn't designed to answer that particular question.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2012 | Rosanna Xia
Plumes of smoke from roasting lamb skewers curl into the night air. Crowds jostle past fermented tofu stands and vats of curry fish balls. "Xia bing'er! Xia bing'er!" one vendor sings in the high, lilting dialect of Beijing. "Shrimp pancakes!" David Fung, a new Houston Rockets hat on his head, slides through the Asian night market in Pasadena with his brother, Andrew. "Dude, this is like the 626 Olympics," he says, weaving to the beat of Rihanna and YG. The two are swept up in the moment and start belting out a version of their viral YouTube rap about the 626 - the area code of much of the San Gabriel Valley.
SPORTS
January 7, 2012 | Barry Stavro
Memphis opened the New Year by getting walloped last Sunday by Chicago, 104-64, in the Bulls' home opener. Grizzlies guard O.J. Mayo didn't help, missing seven of nine shots. "The crazy thing about [Chicago], we didn't even do any partying or anything the night before to celebrate the New Year," Mayo said. "We tried to keep it professional, and still came out and got beat by 40. " San Antonio Spurs Coach Gregg Popovich was asked about Minnesota Timberwolves rookie Ricky Rubio , who was born in Spain, and his adjustment to American culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1990 | MICHAEL SZYMANSKI, Szymanski is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
They came from countries far away, some fled for their lives. Now, they meet because they feel lost in a strange land--the San Fernando Valley. About 40 Spanish-speaking senior citizens meet every Friday morning at the East Valley Multipurpose Center in North Hollywood to talk about their lives--good and bad, past and present. "Most of the time, we talk of the past, we love the past," said Daisy Lugo, who left Costa Rica in 1946 to study English and never returned.
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a softly lit nightclub stage, backed by a rhythm guitar, bass and drums playing a driving blues riff, Adriane Michel grasped a microphone in her two small hands and belted out the "Schoolgirl Blues." "Woke up this morning, and I didn't know what to do So I decided to sing the blues Then I called my friends But they were out at the mall and I didn't have any breakfast so that's why I'm singing the blues . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2011 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
With Christmas comes tradition in the Traband household: A plate of cookies for Santa and carrots for his reindeer. A stocking full of treats for Omar, the family dog. A noble fir decorated with golden garland and keepsake ornaments. But there is no angel atop the tree. Sahira Traband feels that would conflict with her family's faith. They are Muslims. "The magic of Christmas is the part we celebrate," said Traband, 45. "We didn't get into the whole religious thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
An ambitious downtown center created to celebrate the role of Mexican Americans in Los Angeles culture and history opened with great fanfare six months ago, fueled by more than $36 million in public funds and boasting a prominent board of directors. Today the center, La Plaza de Cultura y Artes, is staggering. Its chief executive was let go in August, and he's accused of mismanagement. Attendance has been sparse. The private foundation set up to run it hasn't raised much money.
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