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American Exceptionalism

NEWS
April 13, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
This year's presidential campaign has had its share of arguments over issues long thought settled - contraception, for one. But another wrangle between Republicans and President Obama dates far earlier than that 1960s throwback and centers on the very origins of the nation. Republicans have argued that the president fails to understand that the country was divinely inspired, based on the Declaration of Independence's assertion that citizens were “endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights.” The "American exceptionalism" argument, as it is known, is meant to curry favor with tea party adherents who revere the founding documents, inspire a religiously tinged sense of optimism and -- not least -- portray the president as out of the American mainstream.
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OPINION
May 1, 2009
Re "Squanderer in chief" and "Obama's blind hubris," Opinion, April 28 Tuesday on the Op-Ed page, James Kirchick castigates President Obama for his "obsequious behavior" and Jonah Goldberg takes him to task for his "arrogance" and "hubris." I never could understand the thinking of the far right. Now I'm beginning to wonder if they understand their own thinking. In any case, Kirchick gets it wrong when he lambastes Obama for apologizing to countries around the world. The U.S. has a lot of apologizing to do for our numerous offenses under the Bush administration, including waging an unwarranted war and torture.
NEWS
December 4, 1992
The only eyewitness account we have of the Puritans' first Thanksgiving (by Edward Winslow) describes three days of sporting, entertaining and feasting, hardly the pious sobriety one would ascribe to a "grim, self-righteous and self-satisfied" society. Rutten should not dismiss the Puritans so quickly. After all, the movement was diverse enough to include poet John Milton, a champion of civil liberty and free expression. While their little theocracy had a dismal civil rights record, most atheist states and so-called people's republics have done far worse.
OPINION
April 28, 2009 | James Kirchick, James Kirchick is an assistant editor of the New Republic.
At a stop on his grand global apology tour this spring, President Obama was asked by a reporter in France if he believed in "American exceptionalism." This is the notion that our history as the world's oldest democracy, our immigrant founding and our devotion to liberty endow the United States with a unique, providential role in world affairs.
WORLD
September 11, 2013 | By Mitchell Landsberg
He invoked God, the pope and the rule of law, and recalled a time when the United States and Russia were allies "and defeated the Nazis together. " But don't think for a moment that Vladimir Putin has lost his edge. In a bluntly worded commentary published in Thursday's New York Times, the Russian president castigated the idea of American "exceptionalism," essentially called the United States an international bully and said he "carefully studied" President Obama's speech Tuesday to the nation on Syria, and determined that he disagreed with it. Still, Putin said his "working and personal relationship with President Obama is marked by growing trust," and he welcomed Obama's willingness to work with Russia on a plan to place Syria's chemical weapons under international control.
NEWS
January 21, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
A buoyant Newt Gingrich struck a populist tone while claiming a double-digit, come-from-behind victory Saturday night, saying that South Carolina voters proved that bold ideas could trump deep campaign coffers. “Thank you to everyone in South Carolina who decided to be with us in changing Washington,” he said, speaking to hundreds of jubilant supporters overflowing a hotel ballroom here. “The biggest thing I take from the campaign in South Carolina is that it is very humbling and very sobering to have so many people who so deeply want their country to get back on the right track.
NEWS
October 1, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
Jeb Bush is ruling out a presidential bid in 2012, but he sounds bullish about the future of another Florida Republican, describing Senate nominee Marco Rubio as "Reaganesque. " The former two-term governor and brother of former President George W. Bush said in an interview with MSNBC's Joe Scarborough that although he would not run for president, he does plan to be active in the political scene. "I'm troubled about the future of our country. I think we're stuck when we need to be explosively moving forward to transform how we do things," he said.
NEWS
January 27, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
Positioning herself more and more like a presidential candidate, Sarah Palin issued a lengthy and blistering response to President Obama's State of the Union address late Wednesday, saying that the president had lost the trust of the American people. "Real leadership is more than just words; it's deeds," the former Alaska governor said in a message published on Facebook. "The president's deeds don't lend confidence that we can trust his words spoken" Tuesday night. Like many Republicans, Palin equated Obama's call for renewed investment in education, infrastructure and technology as a mandate for ramped-up federal spending.
NEWS
July 28, 2012 | By James Rainey
For American fans watching on television, the Olympic Games mark an escape from workaday cares and annoyances - like political advertising. That isn't stopping President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney from trying to score a few friendly political points with pitches during the games - Obama during the opening ceremonies with a nonpartisan ode to the American work ethic and a pro-Romney "super PAC" launching spots about his winning tenure as head of the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Games.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
You saw the headline: “42% of American adults will be obese by 2030, study says.” But hey, why be a glass-half-full nation?  Why not a headline that says “58% of American adults won't be obese by 2030, study says”? If we can't be realistic, why not be optimistic? If we're going to be fat, can't we also be happy? That way, when you read this -- “a new report estimated that the cost of treating those additional obese people for diabetes, heart disease and other medical conditions would add up to nearly $550 billion over the next two decades” -- you won't despair.
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