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American Exceptionalism

NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian
On Monday, shortly after delivering a speech to the graduating class of Barnard College extolling the role of women in public life, President Obama continued his theme with a visit to ABC's “The View.” His appearance will be broadcasted Tuesday. It was his fourth time on the show, his second as president. The ladies of “The View” like the president, and as it turns out, he's pretty good for them; in July 2010, the president helped the distaff gabfest earn its best ratings ever (6.59 million people watched the show, according to the network)
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OPINION
March 2, 2004 | David Greenberg, David Greenberg's new book, "Nixon's Shadow: The History of an Image," recently won the Washington Monthly Political Book Award for 2003.
By the end of his career, the Pulitzer Prize-wining historian Daniel Boorstin, who died last weekend at 89, had come to be derided in some quarters as a conservative. In an age that viewed national myths with skepticism, Boorstin celebrated American exceptionalism and touted Western achievements.
OPINION
September 17, 2013
Re "The end of U.S. exceptionalism," Opinion, Sept. 12 Apparently vexed by the "oddness" of President Obama's speech on Syria last week, Timothy Garton Ash's commentary is an odd piece itself. The term "exceptionalism" was used in the title but never again appeared or explained thereafter, hence leaving the reader guessing. "Exceptionalism" in this article could mean "isolationist" at times and "interventionist" at others, or both, depending on the zeitgeist. Parenthetically, for your "average" American reader, "exceptionalism" has often been thought of as American material and cultural superiority.
OPINION
December 2, 2011 | By Tom Engelhardt
If you want a gauge of an America on the downward slope, you could look at the recent poll commissioned by the newspaper the Hill, in which a startling 69% of respondents said they considered the country to be in decline. Or you could just consider the soaring language of this season's presidential candidates. Mitt Romney, in a recent Republican debate on foreign policy, was typical, insisting that "this century must be an American century" in which "America leads the free world and the free world leads the entire world.
BOOKS
March 8, 1998 | ESMOND WRIGHT, Esmond Wright is emeritus professor of U.S. history at the University of London. He received his degree at the University of Virginia in 1940. He recently completed a three-volume history of the U.S., and has edited "The Sayings of Benjamin Franklin."
Paul Johnson is brave and bold, comprehensive and versatile: brave and bold, in that he writes a 900-page single-volume history of the United States without having studied its history at school (Stonyhurst) or university (Oxford) where, in any case, in his day no American history was taught.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2003 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Activists gathered in Redondo Beach on Saturday for an Amnesty International conference concluded that they don't have to venture overseas to find human rights abuses. Instead, they said, there are plenty here at home. The group's annual western regional conference, which began Friday and ends today at the Crowne Plaza Redondo Beach hotel, discussed different faces of discrimination around the globe -- everything from violence against women and gays to the ravages of AIDS in Africa to U.S.
OPINION
April 20, 2011
The winning electoral coalition assembled by Ronald Reagan in the 1980s has been compared to a three-legged stool, the legs being social conservatives, fiscal conservatives and national security conservatives. As the 2012 Republican race takes shape, another leg has been added to the stool — the "tea party" movement. Last week, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney announced that he was setting up an exploratory committee (though it's hardly a secret what he'll discover), as did former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
TAMPA, Fla. -- Mitt Romney claimed the Republican nomination for president Tuesday, six years after he first began his run for the White House and on the first full day of a storm-shortened national convention. For months the unofficial nominee, Romney won his party's formal imprimatur in the traditional roll call of states. Romney, 65, served as governor of Massachusetts for one term but has rested much of his campaign on his business background as a consultant and venture capitalist.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Michael McGough
First Rep. Michele Bachmann renounced the Swiss citizenship she acquired through her husband, insisting that "I am, and always have been, 100% committed to our United States Constitution and the United States of America.” Then it was reported that Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin, a native of Brazil, had filed papers to renounce his American citizenship before the company went public, a step that apparently will redound to his financial benefit...
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
Newt Gingrich effusively praised Rick Perry, his one-time rival for the GOP presidential nomination who dropped out earlier Thursday and endorsed the former House speaker. In Perry's announcement, “he talked about the mission. I think this is really important. People can run or not run, people might end up being president or not being president, but there is a mission as a citizen that's really an important part of being an American,” Gingrich said. “And I really was grateful that Rick Perry emphasized that his mission is not going to change, that he is still committed to helping his country every way he can.” He said he spoke with Perry on Thursday morning, and asked the Texas governor to lead an effort to draft states' rights legislation that Gingrich would try to pass within 90 of being inaugurated.
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