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American Federation Of Television And Radio Artists

BUSINESS
June 10, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
Several hundred actors rallied outside the headquarters of the Screen Actors Guild on Monday to support their leaders and blast a contract with the Hollywood studios recently negotiated by the smaller actors union, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists.
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BUSINESS
October 10, 2000 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Representatives of actors and advertisers confirmed Monday that they will meet again next week in New York to try to jump-start contract negotiations that broke down late last month. Meetings are set to start Oct. 19, with both sides promising that they will remain at the bargaining table if progress is made.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
While acknowledging that "people of color" remain severely underrepresented in television roles, representatives from the three networks predict a brighter future for minority actors, possibly because of NBC's newest daytime drama, "Generations." "Because of ("Generations," which includes a core black family) you're going to see blacks in dramatic roles. . . . The network is brave enough now," said Judi Ann Mason, an associate head writer for the soap, during a Thursday session of the Screen Actors Guild/American Federation of Television and Radio Artists Ethnic Employment Opportunities Committee Conference in Universal City.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2004 | James Bates, Times Staff Writer
Actors and studios are considering extending their labor agreement for one year to avoid a potential work slowdown, the two sides said Sunday. Discussions between the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers and Hollywood's two actor unions, the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, started Tuesday and recessed Friday. They are expected to resume in the next few days.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2000 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Judging Amy" star Amy Brenneman was there with an arm around co-star Tyne Daly. A bearded Noah Wyle of "E.R." sat with actor Richard Dreyfuss. Actor William Baldwin recited the line he uttered once in a New York lottery ad. Comedian Buddy Hackett said that in his hometown of Las Vegas, "We only fold in poker."
BUSINESS
February 4, 2008 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
The American Federation of Television and Radio Artists has made good on its threat to break ranks with its more powerful sister union, the Screen Actors Guild. AFTRA's board of directors voted Saturday to separately negotiate its upcoming prime-time television contract with the major studios -- without SAG at the bargaining table. The decision effectively ends a 27-year partnership between the two unions under which they had jointly negotiated film and prime-time TV contracts.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1990 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
A group of local TV journalists who refused to pay increased union dues won an 11th-hour reprieve Thursday from a threat by the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) to strip them of their jobs unless they came up with the full amount by Tuesday. The local chapter of AFTRA had said it would ask NBC to fire the dissident Los Angeles reporters "pursuant to the union security clause in the collective bargaining agreement with NBC" unless they paid up.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Labor Relations Board is investigating a complaint brought against CBS Broadcasting Inc. by the local chapter of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, which contends that the company has not been forthcoming in detailing its affirmative action and promotion policies for minorities, women and the disabled. The board has scheduled a Nov.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2008 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
After watching the Golden Globes gala implode last weekend in the face of the Writers Guild of America strike, the organizers of the 50th Annual Grammy Awards began a campaign Tuesday to preserve their Feb. 10 show.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2004 | Jeff Leeds, Times Staff Writer
Hollywood's two actors unions agreed to extend their contract with producers by one year, staving off the threat of a crippling strike or production slowdown. The deal continues the actors' current three-year TV and film pact, which had been set to expire June 30. It will give the major studios a chance to focus on potentially difficult talks with Hollywood writers, whose contract expires in May.
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