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American Federation Of Television And Radio Artists

ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
While acknowledging that "people of color" remain severely underrepresented in television roles, representatives from the three networks predict a brighter future for minority actors, possibly because of NBC's newest daytime drama, "Generations." "Because of ("Generations," which includes a core black family) you're going to see blacks in dramatic roles. . . . The network is brave enough now," said Judi Ann Mason, an associate head writer for the soap, during a Thursday session of the Screen Actors Guild/American Federation of Television and Radio Artists Ethnic Employment Opportunities Committee Conference in Universal City.
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BUSINESS
February 9, 2004 | James Bates, Times Staff Writer
Actors and studios are considering extending their labor agreement for one year to avoid a potential work slowdown, the two sides said Sunday. Discussions between the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers and Hollywood's two actor unions, the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, started Tuesday and recessed Friday. They are expected to resume in the next few days.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1990 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
A group of local TV journalists who refused to pay increased union dues won an 11th-hour reprieve Thursday from a threat by the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) to strip them of their jobs unless they came up with the full amount by Tuesday. The local chapter of AFTRA had said it would ask NBC to fire the dissident Los Angeles reporters "pursuant to the union security clause in the collective bargaining agreement with NBC" unless they paid up.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Labor Relations Board is investigating a complaint brought against CBS Broadcasting Inc. by the local chapter of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, which contends that the company has not been forthcoming in detailing its affirmative action and promotion policies for minorities, women and the disabled. The board has scheduled a Nov.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2004 | Jeff Leeds, Times Staff Writer
Hollywood's two actors unions agreed to extend their contract with producers by one year, staving off the threat of a crippling strike or production slowdown. The deal continues the actors' current three-year TV and film pact, which had been set to expire June 30. It will give the major studios a chance to focus on potentially difficult talks with Hollywood writers, whose contract expires in May.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2003 | James Bates, Times Staff Writer
Actors and advertisers agreed Wednesday to a tentative three-year contract governing commercials, heading off a rerun of frictions that three years ago led to Hollywood's longest strike. Specifics of the deal won't be unveiled until directors of the Screen Actors Guild and its sister union, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, meet next week. Members of the unions must ratify the deal, with a vote likely by late October. The current contract expires Oct. 29.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2003 | James Bates, Times Staff Writer
A plan to combine Hollywood's two major performers unions entered the final act Sunday when directors of each organization overwhelmingly approved the formation of a 150,000-member umbrella group representing actors, broadcasters and recording artists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2000 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The union representing airborne radio and TV reporters is seeking new work rules that would allow them to reject airborne assignments without punishment if they are worried about their safety. Reporters, camera technicians and pilots will announce their demands at a news conference today, when they will ask all station owners and aircraft charter companies to adopt new basic standards for coverage.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what was billed as the most comprehensive study ever of casting on television, a report released Tuesday by Hollywood's two major actors' unions found that white males under 40 work more and earn more than any other group.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2000 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imploring Congress to help on one front and resisting its intervention on another, Hollywood spent Thursday asking lawmakers to weigh in on a record-long actors strike and butt out on the subject of entertainment violence. Celebrities led by actress Susan Sarandon asked members of Congress to press the advertising industry to end a crippling five-month strike, which is dragging on primarily over payment for commercials on cable television and the Internet.
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