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ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1992 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
First comes what Julie Bozzi calls "the laugh of recognition," a giggle at seeing something familiar in an unfamiliar setting. Pieces of breakfast cereal enshrined beneath glass. Miniaturized plates of chow mein, nachos and black-eyed peas in a drawer. Rows and rows of doughnuts, each a different shape and variety, laid out like scientific specimens.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
October 27, 2012 | Jonathan Gold, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
Have you been to Tom Bergin's Tavern lately? No - not Molly Malone's, the pub with the bands; the other one on Fairfax, a few blocks south, with the Irish coffee and the old Bing Crosby vibe. Bergin's has been a fascinating place since Brandon Boudet took it over last summer, partly because you're unsure whether you have fallen prey to an elaborate put-on or whether you really have stepped back into Raymond Chandler's L.A., whether the names of the paper shamrocks still stapled to the ceiling are of authentic provenance and whether the dinginess of the barroom is real.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1990 | RUTH REICHL
If "A Moveable Feast" were a restaurant, it would be a health food cafeteria. As you walked down the line, looking at a lot of dreary dishes that were supposed to be good for you, you'd think how much happier a hamburger would make you. But in the case of this particular "Feast" (airing at 8 tonight on Channels 28 and 15 under the "Smithsonian World" banner), it doesn't even turn out to be particularly good for you.
OPINION
August 14, 2012
Re "French gag on ban of foie gras in California," Aug. 11 The ban on foie gras in California is a bit comical and so very American in its hypocrisy. Yes, ducks and geese are force-fed grain to grow their livers, but foie gras is not an everyday American food. It is expensive and uncommon. I challenge the people who worked so hard to ban foie gras in California to visit the beef, chicken, pork, egg and milk "factories" in our state. Perhaps these activists should put their energy toward banning the incredibly inhumane treatment of these animals, which are consumed daily by most Americans.
FOOD
July 4, 2007 | Charles Perry, Times Staff Writer
ANDREW SMITH is talking about hamburgers. He's got a hamburger book coming out later this year, and he's got burgers on his mind. He's already the ketchup guy, author of "Pure Ketchup: A History of America's National Condiment." And the peanut guy ("Peanuts: The Illustrious History of the Goober Pea") and the popcorn guy ("Popped Culture").
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1992 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
First comes what Julie Bozzi calls "the laugh of recognition," a giggle at seeing something familiar in an unfamiliar setting. Pieces of breakfast cereal enshrined beneath glass. Miniaturized plates of chow mein, nachos and black-eyed peas in a drawer. Rows and rows of doughnuts, each a different shape and variety, are laid out like scientific specimens.
FOOD
July 25, 1991 | RUTH REICHL, TIMES FOOD EDITOR
When L'Ermitage opened in 1975 it was a restaurant for rich people. When it closed last week it was an institution. Why should you care? Because even if you've never been to an expensive restaurant--and have no intention of setting foot inside of one--it changed the way you eat. When Jean Bertranou opened L'Ermitage, what we all understood to be "good food" was Continental; it relied mainly on meat. "American food," of course, meant hot dogs and hamburgers and steak.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2012 | By Russ Parsons, Tribune newspapers
The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat Thomas McNamee Free Press, 339 pp., $27 Ask your average Food Network viewer or Yelp poster about Craig Claiborne and you're likely to be met with a blank look and a "Who?" How fleeting is fame in the food world. Claiborne is one of the giants of this modern age, even if today - less than 20 years after his passing - he is largely forgotten. People remember James Beard because of the foundation that keeps his name alive. Julia Child lives on in television reruns (even if some fans now believe she looked just like Meryl Streep)
FOOD
February 19, 1997
"Classic American Food Without Fuss" (Villard, $25), the third installment from Frances McCullough and Barbara Witt ("Great Food Without Fuss" and "Great Feasts Without Fuss"), focuses on the signature foods that make up this country's cuisine. Cobb salad, stuffed pork chops, even the American take on duck a l'orange.
TRAVEL
June 18, 1989 | BENJAMIN BYCEL, Bycel is a lawyer and free-lance writer living in Santa Barbara.
We had climbed Masada, floated in the Dead Sea, prayed at the Wailing Wall, traced the steps of Jesus and touched Mohammed's rock. We had "done" Israel, like millions of other tourists before us, and we were exhausted. We had a few days left on our family vacation and wanted to do something different and restful. "It can't be another museum or ancient ruin," our teen-ager said. We agreed. We consulted an Israeli friend who is a travel agent. "I have just the thing for you," she said, "a dude ranch in the Galilee."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2012 | By Mary Rourke, Special to The Times
Marion Cunningham's crusade to preserve the nightly supper hour came of her concern that without it children would never learn table manners or the give and take of dinner conversation. Not only that, she worried that such traditional American dishes as roast chicken, iceberg lettuce salad and strawberry shortcake would become endangered species. Her devotion to standard American fare made her a venerated figure in the food world whose revised edition of "The Fannie Farmer Cookbook," a basic text for home cooks since 1896, brought her philosophy back into the mainstream.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The roughly 20 million workers involved up and down the American food chain make up a sixth of the country's entire workforce -- a fifth if you exclude public employees. But they're not treated especially well, according to a new report. The Food Chain Workers Alliance interviewed some 700 workers and employers in food production, processing, distribution, retail and service sectors for its study. That includes employees at farms, slaughterhouses, warehouses, grocery stores, restaurants and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2012 | By Russ Parsons, Tribune newspapers
The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat Thomas McNamee Free Press, 339 pp., $27 Ask your average Food Network viewer or Yelp poster about Craig Claiborne and you're likely to be met with a blank look and a "Who?" How fleeting is fame in the food world. Claiborne is one of the giants of this modern age, even if today - less than 20 years after his passing - he is largely forgotten. People remember James Beard because of the foundation that keeps his name alive. Julia Child lives on in television reruns (even if some fans now believe she looked just like Meryl Streep)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2011 | By Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
In the wake of new California legislation that outlaws the sale and possession of shark fins, some Chinese American food purveyors are objecting that the law unfairly deprives their customers of a centuries-old Asian delicacy, shark fin soup. "Now it's just one more thing Chinese people cannot find in America," said Thai Ong, manager of Monterey Park's Wing Hop Fung, a Chinese specialty store that carries dried shark fin. Dried shark fin, the soup's main ingredient, can sell for more than $2,000 a pound in California.
FOOD
August 18, 2011 | By Miles Clements, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For every restaurant whose menu reads like a doctoral thesis on globalization, there are those that still consider a kind of insular Americana the noblest pursuit. These are the dens of hard-line pit masters and down-home confectioners, restaurants where the American culinary heritage provides incubation for innovation. At the similarly minded but altogether unaffiliated Toni's Soul Burgers in Inglewood and Otis Jackson's Soul Dog in North Hollywood, that American ingenuity takes the form of a double dose of comfort: hybridized hamburgers and hot dogs fused with soul food.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2011 | By Kurt Streeter, Los Angeles Times
A feud between Los Angeles officials and business owners on downtown's historic Olvera Street appears headed for a resolution after the City Council moved unanimously Tuesday to approve a negotiated rent increase. The deal calls for rents on Olvera Street — a city-controlled venue highlighting Mexican American food and culture — to rise in steps, edging toward market level in five years. It also ensures that Olvera Street businesses, most of which have been operating on month-to-month leases since the mid-1990s, can continue operating for as long as 40 years.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1997 | VANESSA VALKIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ten years ago, Steve Bernard and his wife began a small business making kettle-fried chips in a shop in Cape Cod, Mass. Today they're looking far from home for big sales growth--to markets in Europe, South America and Canada. "We're growing 100% every year," Bernard said. "The area where the U.S. has a little edge is in snack food." While U.S. agricultural exports are projected to drop overall this year, snack-food exports boomed 30% the first six months of 1996, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
FOOD
January 6, 1999 | CHARLES PERRY
A lot of curry spices are old friends--cumin, ginger, cinnamon, mustard, chile pepper. But not the two used most abundantly: turmeric and coriander. They're so uncommon in this country that a lot of us aren't even sure how to pronounce "turmeric" (it's TUR-mer-ic, everybody). The Greeks and Romans used coriander, though the Greeks claimed it smelled like bedbugs (which is what koriandron meant in Greek).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2010 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
L.A. hipsters love a secret, and for now, Eveleigh in West Hollywood is it. Not that it has a secret phone number or that you need to know a Hollywood insider to score a reservation. The new restaurant from Aussies Nick Mathers, Lincoln Pilcher and Nick Hatsatouris is hidden in plain sight ? on the Sunset Strip. Yet even armed with the address, I drove past it three times, yes, making three U-turns before I realized that a patch of trees hid the place from view. Once the valets waved me in, I realized the only sign is the valet's (in small letters)
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