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American Football Conference

SPORTS
September 1, 1995 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before going further in this dissertation on football's rear bumper, let's get one thing straight: The AFC title is not going to be won by the defending champion San Diego Chargers. Too many little bugs in the locker room. Too many giants on the schedule. The Chargers have suffered through the death of David Griggs, the illness of Coach Bobby Ross, the serious injury of Darrien Gordon and the nasty holdout of Natrone Means. They are a team that relies not on stars, but staying power.
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SPORTS
January 16, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Throw out the video. Throw in the Terrible Towels. The San Diego Chargers, disregarded in the preseason, maligned during a regular-season slump and mocked in the postseason, foiled their critics with one more improbable comeback at Three Rivers Stadium on Sunday, defeating the Pittsburgh Steelers, 17-13, in the AFC championship game.
SPORTS
January 16, 1995 | From Associated Press
Some 75,000 jubilant fans jammed Jack Murphy Stadium on Sunday night, welcoming a San Diego Charger team bound for its first Super Bowl. They screamed, waved and threw toilet paper in celebration of the 17-13 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers. So many people showed up, some were turned away. They parked on neighboring streets to hear the festivities and watch the fireworks. The stadium's giant-screen TV showed the team's plane arriving at Lindbergh Field.
SPORTS
January 16, 1995 | MIKE DOWNEY and STEVE SPRINGER
Pittsburgh Steeler defensive back Tim McKyer collapsed after the game, overwrought with anguish after giving up the winning touchdown pass to Tony Martin in the fourth quarter on a 43-yard scoring play from San Diego Charger quarterback Stan Humphries. But McKyer's coach, Bill Cowher, wasn't about to let his defensive back take the brunt of the blame. "I think it's very unfair of him to do that to himself," Cowher said, "because there's no one play that wins or loses football games. . . .
SPORTS
January 16, 1995 | LONNIE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The reaction of Pittsburgh's three most quotable players said it all about the Steelers' emotions after their 17-13 loss to San Diego at Three Rivers Stadium on Sunday. Cornerback Tim McKyer was so devastated after getting beat deep on San Diego's winning touchdown pass that he needed four security guards to help him off the field five minutes after the game.
SPORTS
January 16, 1995 | MIKE DOWNEY
A football sits three yards--nine feet--from a goal line and for San Diego it is fourth and forever. Pittsburgh has one more play. Three yards are all that stand between the Chargers and a Super Bowl, all that is keeping the state of California from possessing both of America's Teams. It is half past noon back in San Diego and everybody must be half past crazy.
SPORTS
January 14, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One side of the country has the real Super Bowl. The other has the Substandard Bowl, an event being treated as if it were the Bud Bowl with live characters. One side has the glamour, the other the grit. One side has Steve Young and Troy Aikman, the other side, those two other guys.
SPORTS
January 14, 1995 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego Charger punter Bryan Wagner suspects that most Steeler fans attending Sunday's AFC championship game in Pittsburgh have forgotten about the last time he played at Three Rivers Stadium. At least, he hopes they have. If not, he can deal with it. Wagner, a former NCAA Division II All-American at Cal State Northridge, will laugh along with his one-time tormentors. He has been through too much in his on-again, off-again NFL career to let the memory of Sept.
SPORTS
January 1, 1995 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 4 a.m. today in Cleveland, while friends were still out celebrating the last night of the year, Vince Erwin punched a clock at a salt factory. For the next seven hours, he loaded coal into a hopper. It was hot and filthy, and the only thing between him and madness were the plugs in his ears. Around 11 a.m., Erwin was planning to punch out and drive an hour to Cleveland Stadium.
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