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SPORTS
January 16, 1995 | MIKE DOWNEY
A football sits three yards--nine feet--from a goal line and for San Diego it is fourth and forever. Pittsburgh has one more play. Three yards are all that stand between the Chargers and a Super Bowl, all that is keeping the state of California from possessing both of America's Teams. It is half past noon back in San Diego and everybody must be half past crazy.
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SPORTS
January 14, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One side of the country has the real Super Bowl. The other has the Substandard Bowl, an event being treated as if it were the Bud Bowl with live characters. One side has the glamour, the other the grit. One side has Steve Young and Troy Aikman, the other side, those two other guys.
SPORTS
January 14, 1995 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego Charger punter Bryan Wagner suspects that most Steeler fans attending Sunday's AFC championship game in Pittsburgh have forgotten about the last time he played at Three Rivers Stadium. At least, he hopes they have. If not, he can deal with it. Wagner, a former NCAA Division II All-American at Cal State Northridge, will laugh along with his one-time tormentors. He has been through too much in his on-again, off-again NFL career to let the memory of Sept.
SPORTS
January 1, 1995 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 4 a.m. today in Cleveland, while friends were still out celebrating the last night of the year, Vince Erwin punched a clock at a salt factory. For the next seven hours, he loaded coal into a hopper. It was hot and filthy, and the only thing between him and madness were the plugs in his ears. Around 11 a.m., Erwin was planning to punch out and drive an hour to Cleveland Stadium.
SPORTS
September 1, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oh, but it has been a difficult summer for the AFC brethren. Forced to hold a longtime enemy up to the light, they have examined him with trembling hands. They have marveled at his timelessness, chuckled at his peculiarities, become quietly outraged at his efficiency. Unable to look anymore without screaming, they have carefully put him down. Wiped their forehead. Swallowed hard. And they have said it: Al Davis was right.
SPORTS
January 17, 1994 | BOB OATES
On a four-game playoff weekend with, clearly, only one superstar, Joe Montana, there were these differences between representatives of the NFL's two conferences: --The league's best pair of teams, the Dallas Cowboys and San Francisco 49ers, won a pair of NFC blowouts, advancing easily to next Sunday's Super Bowl semifinal at Dallas.
SPORTS
January 17, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a day Joe Montana was to be broken at the hands of the unfeeling Houston Oilers. But when the fighting stopped, the hands raised triumphantly were his. The legend was supposed to end, but the legend only grew. Montana rallied the Kansas City Chiefs to 28 second-half points Sunday in defeating the Houston Oilers, 28-20, in the AFC semifinals. Their 11-game winning streak having disappeared, the Oilers sought comfort in the supernatural. "Amazing, just amazing," safety Bubba McDowell said.
SPORTS
December 21, 1993 | From Associated Press
The NFL on CBS is over, and football Sundays won't look the same on television next year. The NFL completed its television package for the next four years on Monday, awarding the AFC to NBC despite receiving a higher bid from CBS, which lost the NFC to Fox on Friday. "It's a terrible disappointment. Sadness. And it comes as something of a surprise," CBS Sports President Neal Pilson said.
SPORTS
January 18, 1993 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After consecutive starts against physically superior NFC teams in the two most recent Super Bowls, the Buffalo Bills have developed an NFC-type defense of their own. That is the biggest change in the Bills in the last three years. And although they will be favored to lose again in the Super Bowl in Pasadena on Jan. 31, the Bills, this time, will at least be as tough as the NFC champions.
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