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American Heart Association

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Although the participants were a little young for romance, it was still a Valentine's Day dedicated to the heart at Noble Avenue School. About 1,000 students from the North Hills elementary school participated Friday in the American Heart Assn.'s "Jump Rope for Heart" fund-raiser, an event geared toward physical rather than emotional fitness.
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BUSINESS
October 3, 1996 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three leading nonprofit organizations are getting a combined total of $2 million to plug Florida citrus products though other foods are equally healthful, raising questions about charities' growing role as paid endorsers. In a series of new commercials funded by the Florida citrus industry, the American Cancer Society, the American Heart Assn. and the March of Dimes tout the benefits of Florida oranges and grapefruit--in the broadest such alliance yet between charities and business.
NEWS
October 1, 1996 | Associated Press
So you didn't eat your vegetables yesterday and you really overdid it with the double-chocolate cake. Don't torture yourself with guilt. Just try to do better in the next few days. That recommendation comes from the American Heart Assn., which has issued reduced-guilt guidelines aimed at getting people to eat right over several days or a week, instead of obsessing over every day or every meal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996 | FRANK MANNING
Students at Calvert Street Elementary School jumped rope Tuesday to raise money for the American Heart Assn. Sponsors had pledged a set amount of money for each time the students' feet left the ground. Kimberly Amaya, 11, a fifth-grader at the school, said she was happy to help the cause. The issue hits home, she said, because a family member has heart trouble. "This is sending money to people who need it," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1996 | KATE FOLMAR
They'll be bowling for dollars--charitable dollars--Sunday at the Brunswick Matador Bowl in Northridge for the fourth annual American Heart Assn. Bowlathon. Dubbed "Bowl From the Heart," the three-hour event is an effort to raise research and community education funds to combat heart disease--the leading killer across race, age and gender lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1995
The Baldwin Hills-Crenshaw area will host its first American Heart Walk today, 1 with more than 300 walkers expected to participate. "It's to raise money for the American Heart Association," said Malaika Tawasufi, regional manager of the heart association, "but it's also to project a positive image of exercise" in the predominantly African American community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1995 | MAKI BECKER
With the unshakable concentration typical of Olympic athletes, Chucky Huenergardt, 7, jumped rope along with his classmates Wednesday at a jump-a-thon to raise money for the American Heart Assn. "You can't stop," Chucky said to himself, getting a little tangled up in his rope, but persisting. "I think I can make it. Come on, come on," he cheered himself on.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1995 | MIMI KO
Chanting "Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, touch the ground," Raymond Paik took turns jumping rope at Laguna Road Elementary School last week as part of the American Heart Assn.'s "Jump Rope for Heart" campaign. "Jumping makes you healthy," the 6-year-old said, after completing a few minutes of jumping tricks. "It's good for your heart."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1995 | ANTONIO OLIVO
Three-time Olympic gold medalist Valerie Brisco-Hooks will lead more than 3,000 runners and walkers through the streets of Woodland Hills on Sunday in the American Heart Assn.'s 10th annual Heart Run and Walk. The event will raise money to help fight cardiovascular ailments such as congenital heart defects, high blood pressure and strokes, which affect more than 70 million Americans. According to American Heart Assn. officials, about $117.4 billion was spent to treat those illnesses in 1993.
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