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BUSINESS
March 6, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
An improved economy and lower unemployment rates boosted revenue at American Indian gaming casinos in 2010, helping them rebound from their first ever drop in revenue a year earlier, a report said. The 1% increase in gambling revenue generated by 448 American Indian facilities in 2010 marks a rebound from the 1% decline in revenue in 2009, according to a study released Tuesday by Alan Meister, an economist with Arlington, Va.-based Nathan Associates Inc. Non-gambling revenue, such as spending on food and entertainment at casinos, increased 0.3% in 2010.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 6, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - During his 18 years with the Pascua Yaqui Police Department, Michael Valenzuela repeatedly grew frustrated when responding to reports of domestic violence. If the aggressor wasn't a tribal member, the best Valenzuela could do was drive the man to the edge of the reservation, let him out and tell him to stay away from his wife or girlfriend. Valenzuela, police chief of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe, said he resorted to the tactic several dozen times because he couldn't legally arrest non-tribal members suspected of assault on the tribe's land.
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NEWS
October 10, 1991
Hollywood will be the site next week of the start of a yearlong "world celebration" honoring Native American and Indian people of the Western Hemisphere in anticipation of the 500th anniversary of their first encounter with Christopher Columbus. The first event of "The Americas Before Columbus--A World Celebration for Native Americans," will be held Monday morning at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, after a press conference there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2014
Henri Lazarof Composer, teacher and art collector Henri Lazarof, 81, a prolific composer and teacher who may have been best known for the modern art collection he and his wife amassed, died Sunday at his home in Los Angeles. The cause was Alzheimer's disease, said his wife, Janice Lazarof. The Lazarofs significantly bolstered the modern art collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 2005 when they gave 130 works - including pieces by Pablo Picasso, Paul Klee, Henry Moore, Alberto Giacometti and others - to the institution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1989
How artists have shown American Indians--depictions ranging from bloodthirsty savages to helpless victims--is examined in an exhibit at the Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum in Griffith Park. The show opened Thursday. The exhibit, entitled "Native Americans, Five Centuries of Changing Views" and based on a book with the same title, covers eight major groups--from Eastern American Indians hundreds of years ago to contemporary views by modern artists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1989
The story of how Americans have treated--and mistreated--their native brethren is a trail of tears and shame that continues to this very day. It unfolds in outrageous detail in the 238-page report of a Senate investigating committee that documents the mismanagement, corruption, fraud and neglect that infect federal programs designed to help American Indians. No member of Congress can read this report without being moved to action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Russell Means, who gained international notoriety as one of the leaders of the 71-day armed occupation of Wounded Knee in South Dakota in 1973 and continued to be an outspoken champion of American Indian rights after launching a career as an actor in films and television in the 1990s, has died. He was 72. Means died Monday at his home in Porcupine, S.D., on the Pine Ridge Reservation, said Glenn Morris, his legal representative. Diagnosed with esophageal cancer in July 2011 and told that it had spread too far for surgery, Means refused to undergo heavy doses of radiation and chemotherapy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1991
Fullerton College will commemorate American Indian heritage with a monthlong display of crafts, artifacts, books and photographs. The exhibit, to be on display at the college's William T. Boyce Library, will coincide with the national observation of Native American Day on Sept. 27. The exhibit, on display from Sept. 9 to Oct. 4, will also feature autographed photos from artists, entertainers, politicians and writers who have a special interest in American Indian history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN
John Fletcher of Newbury Park emerged with half his face smeared with red paint, the other half painted black. Dressed in a beaded Yankton Sioux dance outfit and a feathery Mohawk headdress, the erstwhile probation officer introduced himself by his Indian name--Painted Horse. "I like to come out when they talk about the money helping Indian kids for education," he said. Fletcher, a Delaware Indian, was among dozens of American Indians gathered at the K. M.
NEWS
December 28, 1985 | United Press International
Militant American Indian leader Russell Means, saying that "Marxists are racists," left for Central America on Friday on a mission to bring "warriors" to Nicaragua to join Indians fighting the country's Sandinista government. Means, a Sioux Indian who led the 1973 Wounded Knee uprising in South Dakota, said as he left for Costa Rica that there will be up to 100 American Indian Movement members from the United States and Canada in Central America "by the first week of April."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2013 | Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
When Native American activists from around the U.S. took over Alcatraz in 1969, George P. Horse Capture was a steel inspector for the state Department of Water Resources - a young man on his way to a solid career and ever further away from any sense of pride in his Montana reservation roots. "I was very happy climbing that white mountain of success," he once said. "But then I looked down over the top, and there was nothing there. " The solution was to switch mountains. Joining the protesters for short periods over their 19-month stay, Horse Capture went on to become a passionate advocate for Native American culture and a museum curator who helped give his people an unprecedented voice in how their heritage would be presented and their artifacts displayed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Recruiting a new leader for a big museum can take months - sometimes more than a year - involving search committees, consultants and rounds of interviews and negotiations. In the case of the Autry National Center of the American West, finding its fourth chief executive since opening 25 years ago was a much simpler affair. The biggest challenge was for board chair Marshall McKay, tired from a 12-hour day of meetings, to muster the energy to rush through a hotel corridor in Portland, Ore., catch up with the man he'd pegged as the Autry's next leader, and make him a proposal from out of the blue.
OPINION
March 16, 2013
Re "What Rand Paul got right," Opinion, March 12 We have a fighting force overseas ranging from grunts on the ground to Army Rangers and Navy SEAL teams, all trained, willing and expected to risk their lives on behalf of American values. Here at home are the police, FBI and our National Guard units. Acceptance of assassination is not, so far as I know, considered an American value. Had FDR ordered someone "killed on sight" who could have been captured, as Jonah Goldberg posits in his column on drone warfare, I have no doubt that much of the world, including many Americans, would have been shocked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Russell Means, who gained international notoriety as one of the leaders of the 71-day armed occupation of Wounded Knee in South Dakota in 1973 and continued to be an outspoken champion of American Indian rights after launching a career as an actor in films and television in the 1990s, has died. He was 72. Means died Monday at his home in Porcupine, S.D., on the Pine Ridge Reservation, said Glenn Morris, his legal representative. Diagnosed with esophageal cancer in July 2011 and told that it had spread too far for surgery, Means refused to undergo heavy doses of radiation and chemotherapy.
OPINION
May 27, 2012 | By Charlotte Allen
The contretemps over whether Elizabeth Warren is really an American Indian has gone from the ridiculous to the ridiculous. Warren is the blond, blue-eyed, ultra-liberal Harvard law professor running for Republican Sen. Scott Brown's seat in Massachusetts. Despite a complete lack of evidence outside of "family lore" and "high cheekbones," she listed herself as a "minority" professor in a law faculty directory for some years. Documentation showing Warren to be 1/32 Cherokee - that is, having a Cherokee great-great-great-grandfather - turned out not to exist.
OPINION
May 20, 2012 | By David Treuer
During the election cycle we tend to ask: What does America mean; where are we going? And then someone decides to check on the Indians to find out the answer, as though Indians represent America's soul hidden in the attic. And of course politicians have long stood next to their "souls" and posed for pictures on the campaign trail. Within the last year, Diane Sawyer and "20/20" did a special on the sorry conditions at the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, and the New Yorker featured a grim photo essay on Pine Ridge too. The New York Times published a piece on brutal crime at the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming and another on the deep financial problems at Foxwoods, the Pequot-owned "world's largest" casino in Connecticut.
NEWS
September 28, 1985 | Associated Press
American Indian leader Dennis Banks, who was imprisoned last fall after nine years as a fugitive, left prison Friday to begin a work-release job on a reservation, officials said. Banks, 48, will work as an adult education community counselor in alcohol prevention at Lone Man School in Oglala. Banks was sentenced last Oct. 8 to concurrent three-year prison terms on convictions of rioting with a dangerous weapon and assault with a weapon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
A deserted business park is the nerve center of a humanitarian effort that brings food, clothing, books and hope to a handful of poverty-stricken American Indian reservations in South Dakota and Montana. The Red Cloud American Indian Society works mostly with the Sioux tribes to provide items for daily sustenance, as well as materials such as computers and school textbooks that help the reservation-based American Indians improve the quality of their lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Pala, Calif. -- When Margarita Owlinguish Britten died in 1925, she was a revered elder of the Pala Indian tribe, a survivor of the forced relocation in 1903 of the Cupeño Indians to an area beside the San Luis Rey River in northern San Diego County. But now, renewed doubts about Britten's lineage are at the root of a divisive "blood quantum" dispute roiling the 1,000-member Pala Band of Mission Indians, formed by the fusion of the Cupeño and Luiseño bands. At issue is whether Britten was a full-blooded Indian.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
An improved economy and lower unemployment rates boosted revenue at American Indian gaming casinos in 2010, helping them rebound from their first ever drop in revenue a year earlier, a report said. The 1% increase in gambling revenue generated by 448 American Indian facilities in 2010 marks a rebound from the 1% decline in revenue in 2009, according to a study released Tuesday by Alan Meister, an economist with Arlington, Va.-based Nathan Associates Inc. Non-gambling revenue, such as spending on food and entertainment at casinos, increased 0.3% in 2010.
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