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American Indians Arizona

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NEWS
September 27, 1992 | From Associated Press
The chairman of the Hopi tribe said Saturday that a federal judge's decision to give nearly 61,000 acres of disputed land to the tribe is inadequate and he vowed to appeal the ruling. Vernon Masayesva said in a press release that District Judge Earl Carroll's decision Friday is "yet another example of Navajo aggression at the expense of legitimate Hopi land claims." Attempts to reach Navajo Nation President Peterson Zah or other Navajo officials were unsuccessful.
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NEWS
January 18, 2001 | From Associated Press
Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt killed a proposal Wednesday for an open-pit gold mine in Southern California that he said would irreparably damage Indian cultural and religious sites near the Arizona border. Mining advocates expressed outrage at the decision and the company, Glamis Gold Ltd. of Reno, threatened to fight it in court. Babbitt's decision blocked Glamis from starting the 1,571-acre mine on Bureau of Land Management property about 45 miles northeast of El Centro.
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NEWS
December 10, 1989 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten weeks ago, Grace O'Campo gave her daughter a kiss and a squeeze and sent the girl off for a five-day visit with her paternal grandparents, Navajo Indians who live on the reservation that surrounds this sleepy Colorado River town. The shy first-grader hasn't been home since. When O'Campo telephoned near the end of daughter Earlene's stay, she learned that the 6-year-old had been taken in by her Navajo father, Larry Lee, whom O'Campo left in 1984.
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arizona voters on Tuesday are expected to embrace a popular ballot initiative that would pronounce English the language of the state's public schools. But given the state's unique demographics, the measure could have an unintended consequence. Proposition 203 is largely aimed at the state's growing number of Spanish-speaking students, but the English-only edict also could restrict the teaching of the imperiled languages spoken among Arizona's 21 Native American tribes.
NEWS
July 28, 1989 | RICHARD E. MEYER, Times Staff Writer
Every morning at daybreak, as the farthest hills turn purple, then gold, then quietly blue, a young man with a diamond earring runs east toward the rising sun. Running is his prayer. He calls out his name to the Holy People. "Here I am," he says. "I'm running. Look at me." Ronald Horse Herder is 17.
SPORTS
March 31, 1999 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hey, Dodger fan, jump on a plane, land at Phoenix an hour later, land in your seat at the Dodgers' new spring training home within another hour. Can't beat that in Vero Beach, Fla., where a weekend trip is virtually pointless because getting there and back can take the whole weekend. "It took us eight hours to fly there, two hours to drive there and two hours to get lost," said Bernadine Boyd, tribal president of the Fort McDowell Indian community.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | LAURA LAUGHLIN and PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
New federal regulations sharply restricting the use of video gambling machines on Indian lands set off raids Tuesday on five tribal casinos in Arizona, one of them resulting in a five-hour standoff here with Yavapai Indians who blockaded the exit route for FBI trucks. Casino employees and about 100 tribe members at the Ft.
NEWS
August 23, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was only 9:30 a.m. on this high-desert plain, but Hans Benning and his crew of believers had been pouring sweat for hours, laboring on a shelter for a small congregation of Navajo Christians. It was their fourth day of work. Benning suddenly lost his footing and landed hard on his backside while clambering across the shelter's partly built roof. But the 49-year-old Studio City man, who was already concealing a broken hand, barely paused.
SPORTS
March 31, 1999 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No more overpriced ballpark food! Why pay $6 for a hot dog and soft drink when you can pay $5.99 for a lavish lunch buffet at the casino down the road? Discerning consumers among Dodger fans may hail this bargain, but major league baseball may not. Commissioner Bud Selig said his office would have to approve any agreement to move the Dodgers' spring home to a site near a casino on Arizona's Fort McDowell Indian reservation. "I would reserve the right to look into it, and I would," Selig said.
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | GEORGE HARDEEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr. has decided to defer action on a request by the Peabody Coal Co. for a long-term operating permit for its Black Mesa coal mine, handing a victory to the Hopi and Navajo tribes that blame the company for diminished ground water supplies in the region. The tribes contend that a 250-mile coal slurry pipeline, which draws 1.
NEWS
June 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
American Indians won a rare victory in the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday as the justices allowed the Quechan tribe to pursue its claim to about 25.6 billion gallons of Colorado River water each year. Arizona and California had asked the high court to block the Quechan water claim, saying that the tribe gave up any rights to that water in 1983.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | From Associated Press
American Indians' right to a fair jury is not violated when federal criminal trials in Arizona are transferred from Prescott to Phoenix, where the Indian percentage of the population is much lower, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday. In a 2-1 ruling upholding a Navajo man's convictions for sex crimes, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals said the disparities were irrelevant because there was no evidence that Indians were systematically excluded from the jury.
SPORTS
March 31, 1999 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No more overpriced ballpark food! Why pay $6 for a hot dog and soft drink when you can pay $5.99 for a lavish lunch buffet at the casino down the road? Discerning consumers among Dodger fans may hail this bargain, but major league baseball may not. Commissioner Bud Selig said his office would have to approve any agreement to move the Dodgers' spring home to a site near a casino on Arizona's Fort McDowell Indian reservation. "I would reserve the right to look into it, and I would," Selig said.
SPORTS
March 31, 1999 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hey, Dodger fan, jump on a plane, land at Phoenix an hour later, land in your seat at the Dodgers' new spring training home within another hour. Can't beat that in Vero Beach, Fla., where a weekend trip is virtually pointless because getting there and back can take the whole weekend. "It took us eight hours to fly there, two hours to drive there and two hours to get lost," said Bernadine Boyd, tribal president of the Fort McDowell Indian community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1996 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Below the red rock walls of the majestic Grand Canyon lies a Native American village so isolated that impoverished residents sometimes throw away broken refrigerators because repairmen won't make the 16-mile round-trip hike or mule ride. Even a reindeer-driven sleigh would have trouble navigating it. So a crew of Marines from El Toro Marine Corps Air Station used a pair of CH-46 helicopters Thursday to escort Santa and Mrs.
NEWS
August 23, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was only 9:30 a.m. on this high-desert plain but Hans Benning and his crew of believers had been pouring sweat for five hours, laboring on a shelter for a small congregation of Navajo Christians. It was their fourth day of work when Benning lost his footing and landed hard on his backside while clambering across the shelter's partly built roof. But the 49-year-old Studio City man, who already was concealing a broken hand, barely paused.
NEWS
October 18, 1992 | Associated Press
Centuries-old Indian artifacts that disappeared soon after their discovery have been handed over to an Indian tribe, officials said. The artifacts were found in a cave near Sedona in central Arizona last year and were turned over Oct. 12--Columbus Day--to the Yavapai-Prescott Tribe, tribal officials said. The tribe was contacted by an undisclosed party who arranged the relics' return.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | GEORGE HARDEEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tim Uqualla was riding behind his string of fully loaded pack horses toward his village in the Grand Canyon when the biggest flash floods of his life roared down Havasu Creek, sweeping the animals away like toys. Each was weighted with six, 80-pound sacks of feed pellets. As the floundering horses vanished in the sudden wall of water, rock and mud, Uqualla was certain they would drown. Instead, the water made the pellets swell, causing the sacks to burst open.
NEWS
August 23, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was only 9:30 a.m. on this high-desert plain, but Hans Benning and his crew of believers had been pouring sweat for hours, laboring on a shelter for a small congregation of Navajo Christians. It was their fourth day of work. Benning suddenly lost his footing and landed hard on his backside while clambering across the shelter's partly built roof. But the 49-year-old Studio City man, who was already concealing a broken hand, barely paused.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | From Associated Press
A judge handed three Arizona Indian tribes a victory Monday in their dispute with the state over reservation gambling, allowing them to operate thousands of electronic gaming machines, plus some table games. Former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Frank X. Gordon, appointed by a federal judge in December to mediate the dispute, chose gaming compacts submitted by the Tohono O'odham, White Mountain Apache and Pascua Yaqui tribes.
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