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American Indians California

NEWS
May 6, 2000 | TOM GORMAN and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A decade after Indian tribes began operating video gambling machines in California without state or U.S. government permission, reservation gambling with Nevada-style slot machines finally won formal federal approval Friday. The classic one-armed bandits may be arriving in California within weeks, according to tribal officials.
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NEWS
April 1, 2000 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A California Indian tribe and its Florida partner said Friday that they plan to begin operating a San Diego-based gambling cruise ship later this month, despite failing to win Gov. Gray Davis' approval of special legislation the partnership said it needed to legally launch its floating casino.
NEWS
March 30, 2000 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Indian tribe's plan to operate a gambling cruise ship between San Diego and Rosarito Beach was delayed Wednesday when the state Senate took the bill back from Gov. Gray Davis' desk rather than risk a veto. The legislation by Senate President Pro Tem John Burton was aimed at accommodating the Viejas band of Indians in San Diego County and its partner in the venture by making a seemingly minor change in the law that would have permitted their cruise ship to sail legally in California waters.
NEWS
March 16, 2000 | Associated Press
Southern Nevada casino designer and developer Mark Advent has signed a deal with an Indian tribe to build a $100-million casino in Northern California's wine country. Advent Communications & Entertainment will join with the Dry Creek Band of Pomo Indians to build the 175,000-square-foot casino, which is expected to open by fall 2001 about 70 miles north of San Francisco. "It's a prime location, a very wealthy neighborhood," said tribal Chairwoman Lorilie Fakhouri.
NEWS
February 29, 2000 | TOM GORMAN and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Proponents of Proposition 1A have doubled the size of their campaign war chest over the past month and have now raised about $21 million, new campaign finance reports show. That's far less than the $68.6 million raised in 1998 by proponents of a similar effort, Proposition 5, which ultimately was declared unconstitutional by the state Supreme Court.
NEWS
February 19, 2000 | DAN MORAIN and TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If California voters approve Nevada-style gambling on Indian reservations next month, state authorities will lack clear powers held by Nevada to block convicted felons from working at casinos, conduct unannounced inspections or settle disputes. Polls show that California voters overwhelmingly favor Proposition 1A, the measure on the March 7 ballot that for the first time would legalize a broad range of casino-style gambling in the state. However, under an agreement negotiated by Gov.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | TOM GORMAN and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
To drive along Route 2 in rural Connecticut, where the 23-story Foxwoods casino resort suddenly appears above the woods like some Emerald City, is to contemplate the future of California. The $1-billion-a-year casino business was launched by a struggling Indian tribe that just 15 years ago was growing lettuce and running a pizza parlor.
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Atty. Gen. Janet Reno this month began doling out the biggest law enforcement grants for tribal lands in her department's history, she promised that the $89-million program would "help ensure that all Native Americans living on Indian lands will enjoy the decrease in crime felt throughout the nation." All Native Americans, it seems, except those in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1999
Two executives at the Cabazon Band of Mission Indians' gambling casino in Indio pleaded guilty Thursday to funneling thousands of dollars in illegal contributions to the 1996 reelection campaign of President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore.
NEWS
September 28, 1999 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yakima Dixie has spent much of his adult life in and out of jail. He lives month-to-month on a disability check in a 600-square-foot house heated by wood-burning stoves. The nearest store is seven miles away and he doesn't own a car. But Dixie could get an annual $1-million check for up to 20 years if voters in March approve a deal reached earlier this month between the governor and dozens of Indian tribes with gambling operations.
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