Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAmerican Indians Culture
IN THE NEWS

American Indians Culture

NEWS
July 12, 1996 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not far from the place they call the center of the world, nine Karuk men in deerskin skirts and feathered woodpecker-scalp headdresses perform the sacred Jump Dance, reviving a ritual lost for nearly a century. Waving ornamental baskets in the air, they stomp their feet and chant in unison on a hill above the Klamath River, the spot where their ancestors staged the religious ceremony for thousands of years.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
Solemnly and reverently, 15 members of the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians shared with students at the UC Irvine a part of their heritage: the sacred songs of their Juaneno ancestors. "The songs are gifts to our people," said Rick Mendez, who led the ceremonial singing Thursday for an audience of about 150. "They come from our ancestors or through dreams."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orville Little Owl beat an elk-hide drum as he joined the other Iron Bull Singers at Cal State Fullerton on Saturday to tell musical tales of hunting expeditions and battles, some ancient and others more recent. A member of the Mandan-Hunkpapa Lakota tribe, Little Owl learned the songs of his elders when he was a child on a North Dakota reservation. The Vietnam War veteran said he also weaves his own experiences into his music. "I've been singing since I was 6 years old," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1995 | RICHARD BENKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Indian drum maker Mike Kopepassah cuts a spiral rawhide thong from a wet pelt, then laces it through holes in saturated cowhides stretched over and under a gnarled, hollowed-out cottonwood stump. The hides will dry and shrink tight, turning the stump into one of about 20,000 drums produced every year by craftsmen at Taos Drums and sent out worldwide. Some of the company's drums weigh hundreds of pounds, cost thousands of dollars and double as coffee tables.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1995 | ED BOND
For most of the 10,000 or so visitors to the first-ever Los Angeles Intertribal Pow-Wow, the three-day Hansen Dam Equestrian Center event was a chance to sample a culture most knew little of. For many of the Native Americans, from 40 different tribes across the country, it meant more. "To me it's the closest thing to being home," said Sonny Skyhawk, founder of American Indians in Film, a Pasadena group that fights for a better image in movies for Native Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1995 | DAVID E. BRADY
A celebration of Native American culture began Friday at Hansen Dam Equestrian Center in Lake View Terrace--a local showcase that organizers hope will become an annual event. Promoter Dick Wixon said that nearly 40 tribes will attend the three-day Los Angeles Intertribal Powwow, including Kiowa, Choctaw, Navajo, Pawnee and Sioux. The highlight will be a variety of dance competitions and exhibitions, he said. Events, which are open to the public, continue today and Sunday roughly from 10 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1995 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dwindling Native American tribe clinging to its culture and two adoptive parents clinging to their children faced off Tuesday in a Monterey Park courtroom in an emotional child custody hearing that promises to become a touch point for debate over adoption, Indian sovereignty and children's rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1995 | KAY HWANGBO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Deep in the heart of Rocketdyne property in the Santa Susana Mountains, the Native American cave painting is so closely guarded that even the aerospace company's employees are not allowed to view it without special permission. Manny Tessier, a quality assurance manager for the firm, said the last time he saw the ancient, abstract drawings was in 1969, when he and a fellow worker visited the scooped-out rock formation on a whim.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|