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American Indians Culture

NEWS
November 17, 1997 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been a year since the Red Wind International Inter-Nation Native American tribe lost its schoolhouse in a raging fire. This weekend, Orange County residents pitched in, organizing a fund-raiser and cultural ceremony on Main Street in Garden Grove, with proceeds from the Native American Cultural Days going toward building the new Red Wind University.
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NEWS
November 9, 1997 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only two years ago, social worker Deannah Neswood-Gishey's neighborhood on a hill overlooking the Navajo Nation's tribal capital was peaceful. Picturesque. That was before many of the hogans--the trailers and shacks surrounding her home of 30 years--became turf-war bunkers for gang members and hide-outs for derelicts who swill a toxic mixture of hair spray and water called "ocean."
NEWS
September 3, 1997 | SANDY BANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He lived most of his life in the city of San Fernando, in the shadow of the mission that his grandfather had called home. Five generations of his family--hailing from ancient American Indian tribes--were born or died behind mission walls. But Rudy Ortega--like many Native Americans of his era--grew up oblivious to the American Indian blood running through his veins. In his family, "we were brought up as Mexicans, we spoke Spanish at home," said Ortega, 70. "Maybe they were ashamed.
NEWS
September 3, 1997 | SANDY BANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He lived most of his life in the city of San Fernando, in the shadow of the mission that his grandfather had called home. Five generations of his family--hailing from ancient Indian tribes--were born or died behind mission walls. But Rudy Ortega--like many Native Americans of his era--grew up oblivious to the Indian blood running through his veins. In his family, "We were brought up as Mexicans, we spoke Spanish at home," said Ortega, 70. "Maybe they were ashamed. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1997 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the vendors selling rabbit pelts, beadwork and silver jewelry this weekend at the third annual Los Angeles Intertribal Powwow, Danielle Glenn-Rivera was putting out the word against tobacco abuse--but not exactly against tobacco. Glenn-Rivera, a community education worker for the Los Angeles County Health Services Department, has a mission pungent with irony. She warns smokers about the dangers of tobacco, but treats it with a certain respect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1997 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the vendors selling rabbit pelts, beadwork and silver jewelry this weekend at the third annual Los Angeles Intertribal Pow Wow, Danielle Glenn-Rivera was putting out the word against tobacco abuse--but not exactly against tobacco. Glenn-Rivera, a community education worker for the Los Angeles County Health Services Department, has a mission pungent with irony. She warns smokers about the dangers of tobacco, but treats it with a certain respect.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed with nothing more than a profound sense of obligation, a group of Native Americans is trying to write a long-delayed final chapter to the bizarre story of Ishi, the last Yahi Indian, who became a national sensation when he emerged from the wilderness in 1911. The outlines of Ishi's life are familiar to generations of California schoolchildren.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spiritual rites and modern development clashed Wednesday as the Irvine Co. reburied ancient artifacts unearthed in 1994 while building a Newport Beach housing development. When the Irvine Co. began building the 149 Harbor Cove homes along the bluffs of upper Newport Bay, it discovered skeletal remains and artifacts, including charm stones, hunting tools and ceremony beads belonging to two tribes--the Juanenos band of Mission Indians and the Coastal Gabrieleno-Dieguno Indians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1996 | JOHN POPE
Imparting Chumash tribal wisdom to students at Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary School on Thursday, Mark Mendez warned the children to beware of coyotes, the "tricksters" of Native American lore, as they journey through life. "Stay true to your path," Mendez said, concluding a fable about a young boy who was led astray by a coyote. "There are no shortcuts. Don't be misled by the coyotes you may encounter."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1996 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the second day of the annual Southern California Indian Center Pow Wow reached full swing, Navajo elder Allen Neskahai, 68, hushed an audience of thousands who had come to revel in Indian culture and spoke to the Great Spirit. "We come to you with clean hands and clear hearts," Neskahai said. "Remind us that the Earth does not belong to us. Everything around us has a spirit, the wind, the trees, the water, everything."
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