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NEWS
June 24, 1990
As L. Ron Hubbard told it, he was 4 years old when a medicine man named "Old Tom" made him a "blood brother" of the Blackfeet Indians of Montana, providing the inspiration for the Scientology founder's first novel, "Buckskin Brigades." But one expert on the tribe doesn't buy Hubbard's account. Historian Hugh Dempsey is associate director of the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, Canada. He has extensively researched the tribe, of which his wife is a member.
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NEWS
June 22, 2001 | GEOFFREY MOHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial plan to explore for oil in a Montana valley adorned with indigenous rock art has been put on hold after tribal leaders offered to swap reservation land for the drill site, known as Weatherman Draw. The dispute over Weatherman Draw brought together several Indian tribes, the Sierra Club and the National Trust for Historic Preservation and marked the first test, outside Alaska, of the Bush administration's policy to open up more public land to energy exploration.
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NEWS
September 8, 1988 | FRANK DEL OLMO, Times Staff Writer
A controversial plaque honoring Indian warriors killed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn has been removed from a prominent spot on the Montana battlefield where it had been placed earlier this year by American Indian activists, officials of the National Park Service announced Wednesday at its regional office in Denver. National Park Service Director William Penn Mott Jr.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton was pressed to reconsider allowing oil drilling in a Montana valley sacred to Native Americans. A permit to drill was issued last month to a company owned by a prominent Republican donor. Norton was questioned during a hearing about a permit issued to Anschutz Exploration Corp. Philip Anschutz donated thousands to the campaigns of President Bush, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and others.
NEWS
June 22, 2001 | GEOFFREY MOHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial plan to explore for oil in a Montana valley adorned with indigenous rock art has been put on hold after tribal leaders offered to swap reservation land for the drill site, known as Weatherman Draw. The dispute over Weatherman Draw brought together several Indian tribes, the Sierra Club and the National Trust for Historic Preservation and marked the first test, outside Alaska, of the Bush administration's policy to open up more public land to energy exploration.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along the North Fork of the Big Hole River, Wilford Halfmoon stopped to listen. And there it was again, just beyond the wind--the sound of battle, a faint rumbling that came up from the pines and, growing louder, dizzied his head with whirling visions.
NEWS
July 4, 1988 | FRANK DEL OLMO, Times Staff Writer
For the next few weeks, at least, tourists who visit the site of Custer's Last Stand will have a new, but decidedly unofficial, memorial to ponder--a black metal plate that honors the "Indian Patriots" who defeated the U.S. cavalry here. The memorial plaque was hurriedly installed June 25, the 112th anniversary of the Battle of the Little Bighorn, by American Indian activists--despite the objections of the National Park Service rangers who administer the facility.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | DAN BAUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The U.S. Forest Service on Friday approved an exploratory oil and gas well inside a huge tract of wild land sacred to the Blackfeet Indians and considered prime grizzly bear habitat by Montana wildlife officials. The area, called the Badger-Two Medicine, lies alongside Glacier National Park, and the Forest Service's decision concedes that park visitors will be able to hear and see the well from certain trails inside the park.
NEWS
July 10, 1996 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few hundred miles south of the ranch where the anti-government "freemen" were surrounded by the FBI, another potentially explosive standoff has emerged between Crow tribal leaders and non-American Indian businesses refusing to pay a resort tax. Several of the businesses, situated on patches of private land within the sprawling reservation, recently received final notices: Pay the tax now or risk seizure and sale of property at any time.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buster Yellow Kidney rode his horse into a clearing high on a ridge in the Rocky Mountains and gazed across to Goat Mountain, where he and his late wife used to fast and purify themselves. "I've only gone back up there twice since she died," the Blackfeet tribal elder said, his aging features set in a solemn mask. Then his face brightened and with a sweep of his gnarled hand, he added: "This whole country is sacred to us."
NEWS
July 10, 1996 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few hundred miles south of the ranch where the anti-government "freemen" were surrounded by the FBI, another potentially explosive standoff has emerged between Crow tribal leaders and non-American Indian businesses refusing to pay a resort tax. Several of the businesses, situated on patches of private land within the sprawling reservation, recently received final notices: Pay the tax now or risk seizure and sale of property at any time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
A deserted business park is the nerve center of a humanitarian effort that brings food, clothing, books and hope to a handful of poverty-stricken American Indian reservations in South Dakota and Montana. The Red Cloud American Indian Society works mostly with the Sioux tribes to provide items for daily sustenance, as well as materials such as computers and school textbooks that help the reservation-based American Indians improve the quality of their lives.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along the North Fork of the Big Hole River, Wilford Halfmoon stopped to listen. And there it was again, just beyond the wind--the sound of battle, a faint rumbling that came up from the pines and, growing louder, dizzied his head with whirling visions.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | DAN BAUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The U.S. Forest Service on Friday approved an exploratory oil and gas well inside a huge tract of wild land sacred to the Blackfeet Indians and considered prime grizzly bear habitat by Montana wildlife officials. The area, called the Badger-Two Medicine, lies alongside Glacier National Park, and the Forest Service's decision concedes that park visitors will be able to hear and see the well from certain trails inside the park.
NEWS
August 27, 1990 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another sign of growing Indian political strength in the rural West, Thomas Larson Medicinehorse Sr., a 50-year-old Sundance Chief of the Crow Nation, is poised to become Montana's first elected American Indian sheriff. Big Horn County, population 10,600, is one of many rural counties where American Indians have made important electoral gains in recent years. Another Indian was elected in 1986 to one of three seats on the county commission.
NEWS
June 24, 1990
As L. Ron Hubbard told it, he was 4 years old when a medicine man named "Old Tom" made him a "blood brother" of the Blackfeet Indians of Montana, providing the inspiration for the Scientology founder's first novel, "Buckskin Brigades." But one expert on the tribe doesn't buy Hubbard's account. Historian Hugh Dempsey is associate director of the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, Canada. He has extensively researched the tribe, of which his wife is a member.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
A deserted business park is the nerve center of a humanitarian effort that brings food, clothing, books and hope to a handful of poverty-stricken American Indian reservations in South Dakota and Montana. The Red Cloud American Indian Society works mostly with the Sioux tribes to provide items for daily sustenance, as well as materials such as computers and school textbooks that help the reservation-based American Indians improve the quality of their lives.
NEWS
August 27, 1990 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another sign of growing Indian political strength in the rural West, Thomas Larson Medicinehorse Sr., a 50-year-old Sundance Chief of the Crow Nation, is poised to become Montana's first elected American Indian sheriff. Big Horn County, population 10,600, is one of many rural counties where American Indians have made important electoral gains in recent years. Another Indian was elected in 1986 to one of three seats on the county commission.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buster Yellow Kidney rode his horse into a clearing high on a ridge in the Rocky Mountains and gazed across to Goat Mountain, where he and his late wife used to fast and purify themselves. "I've only gone back up there twice since she died," the Blackfeet tribal elder said, his aging features set in a solemn mask. Then his face brightened and with a sweep of his gnarled hand, he added: "This whole country is sacred to us."
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | FRANK DEL OLMO, Times Staff Writer
A controversial plaque honoring Indian warriors killed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn has been removed from a prominent spot on the Montana battlefield where it had been placed earlier this year by American Indian activists, officials of the National Park Service announced Wednesday at its regional office in Denver. National Park Service Director William Penn Mott Jr.
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