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American Indians New Mexico

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NEWS
March 2, 1992 | ANDREW STINY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The discovery of a large cache of early Indian artifacts in a storage locker in northwestern New Mexico has delighted archeological experts who say the find is rare because the Anasazi items are in exceptional condition. But the discovery is a matter of concern to federal investigators who believe that the items may have been looted from federal or Indian lands. U.S. and local authorities were led to the storage locker in Bloomfield, N.M.
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NEWS
May 19, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The bones of nearly 2,000 American Indians were handed over to a New Mexico tribe by Harvard University for proper burial. It was the largest transfer under the 1990 federal law that requires the return of Indian artifacts, the university said. The bones and other artifacts were excavated from the site of an abandoned Pueblo Indian community in the upper Pecos Valley of New Mexico between 1915 and 1929.
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NEWS
July 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
A 25-year-old man who eluded officers for about 15 hours after the shooting deaths of four relatives surrendered Friday on a rocky ridge near a dirt road. Stanley Secatero is accused of killing his relatives Thursday night, authorities said. He apparently was upset because they had turned his brother in to police for a $1,000 reward. Secatero had fled into the rugged sandstone formations of the remote Canoncito Navajo Reservation 30 miles west of Albuquerque.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
A 25-year-old man who eluded officers for about 15 hours after the shooting deaths of four relatives surrendered Friday on a rocky ridge near a dirt road. Stanley Secatero is accused of killing his relatives Thursday night, authorities said. He apparently was upset because they had turned his brother in to police for a $1,000 reward. Secatero had fled into the rugged sandstone formations of the remote Canoncito Navajo Reservation 30 miles west of Albuquerque.
NEWS
December 23, 1995 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Setting the stage for a historic clash in court--or possibly on American Indian lands--the 10 tribes operating casinos in New Mexico on Friday rejected a federal order that they close the lucrative operations by Jan. 15 or face forfeiture of their gambling devices.
NEWS
December 26, 1987 | BELLA STUMBO, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Paytiamo, 63, governor of the Acoma Nation, population 4,200, stood on a bluff overlooking a rugged wilderness of prehistoric lava beds, fumbling for words and looking shamed as he described aspects of the Acomas' sacred fall Corn Dance to bring rain, an ancient religious ceremony that the tribe has always held in fiercest secrecy from the prying eyes of outsiders. "We place, uh, certain articles, religious items out there (at distances of several miles) in a certain pattern . . .
NEWS
May 19, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The bones of nearly 2,000 American Indians were handed over to a New Mexico tribe by Harvard University for proper burial. It was the largest transfer under the 1990 federal law that requires the return of Indian artifacts, the university said. The bones and other artifacts were excavated from the site of an abandoned Pueblo Indian community in the upper Pecos Valley of New Mexico between 1915 and 1929.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal appeals court ruled that New Mexico's Indian casinos are illegal but may remain open temporarily. The U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver affirmed the ruling of a lower court that the 1995 state-tribal compacts that authorized the casinos were invalid. But the 32-page order included a stay "pending final resolution of this matter, either in this court or the United States Supreme Court" that would allow the 11 casinos to remain open.
NEWS
November 2, 1992 | From Times Staff Writers
WORKING THE WEST: The little-noticed endorsement Clinton got last week from New Mexico's All Indian Pueblo Council not only may boost his prospects in a hotly contested state, but it provided a glimpse of a wider tactical effort. . . . Throughout the interior West, Clinton operatives have sought to rally support for their cause among American Indians. The campaign printed bumper stickers that declare: "Discover the Indian vote." And when Clinton appeared at a rally in Missoula, Mont.
NEWS
March 14, 1990 | ANN ROVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 600 Navajos jammed a public hearing here Tuesday looking into allegations that the federal government failed to protect the health of uranium miners, many of them Indians, hired during the early days of the nation's atomic weapons program. Numerous miners and miners' widows testified that they had not been warned by employers of any danger, yet have since suffered numerous cancers and respiratory illnesses.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juniper branches scratch at our rented RV's aluminum roof, but we manage to edge up the final stretch of this steep, cockeyed dirt road--our toughest driving test yet this summer as we poke around America, searching for insight into the American family. The first thing the kids spot is a big red, green and blue macaw that's been scrutinizing our ascent from the wispy limb of another tree.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal appeals court ruled that New Mexico's Indian casinos are illegal but may remain open temporarily. The U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver affirmed the ruling of a lower court that the 1995 state-tribal compacts that authorized the casinos were invalid. But the 32-page order included a stay "pending final resolution of this matter, either in this court or the United States Supreme Court" that would allow the 11 casinos to remain open.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. attorney in New Mexico on Friday suspended his ultimatum to seize American Indian gambling assets on Monday, in return for a promise from tribal leaders to drop a lawsuit against such a move and not to blockade vital state highways. U.S. Atty. John Kelly and nine tribes operating casinos ended their standoff in order to allow a federal judge to rule on the legality of compacts signed by Republican Gov. Gary Johnson that permitted Las Vegas-style gambling on the reservations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1995 | RICHARD BENKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Indian drum maker Mike Kopepassah cuts a spiral rawhide thong from a wet pelt, then laces it through holes in saturated cowhides stretched over and under a gnarled, hollowed-out cottonwood stump. The hides will dry and shrink tight, turning the stump into one of about 20,000 drums produced every year by craftsmen at Taos Drums and sent out worldwide. Some of the company's drums weigh hundreds of pounds, cost thousands of dollars and double as coffee tables.
NEWS
December 23, 1995 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Setting the stage for a historic clash in court--or possibly on American Indian lands--the 10 tribes operating casinos in New Mexico on Friday rejected a federal order that they close the lucrative operations by Jan. 15 or face forfeiture of their gambling devices.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A dozen miles south of this city of 400,000 people, the Pueblo of Isleta sits on a bend in the Rio Grande amid groves of sinuous cottonwood trees, a quiet reminder of an ancient way of life. Pueblo residents divert some of the river's muddy brown waters to irrigate their fields. At certain times of the year, they also drink river water in traditional religious ceremonies.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. attorney in New Mexico on Friday suspended his ultimatum to seize American Indian gambling assets on Monday, in return for a promise from tribal leaders to drop a lawsuit against such a move and not to blockade vital state highways. U.S. Atty. John Kelly and nine tribes operating casinos ended their standoff in order to allow a federal judge to rule on the legality of compacts signed by Republican Gov. Gary Johnson that permitted Las Vegas-style gambling on the reservations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1989 | JOSEPH E. BROWN, Brown is a free - lance science writer in Coronado .
Deep within a barren, rocky, half-mile-wide canyon in northwestern New Mexico, a small army of scientists is working against time to solve the mystery of a long-vanished pre-Columbian civilization. There, multistoried buildings, elaborate waterworks and far-ranging road networks have challenged archeologists for more than a century. The site is Chaco Canyon, 120 miles west of Santa Fe in the heart of the arid, desolate, 30,000-square-mile San Juan Basin of the Southwest.
NEWS
November 2, 1992 | From Times Staff Writers
WORKING THE WEST: The little-noticed endorsement Clinton got last week from New Mexico's All Indian Pueblo Council not only may boost his prospects in a hotly contested state, but it provided a glimpse of a wider tactical effort. . . . Throughout the interior West, Clinton operatives have sought to rally support for their cause among American Indians. The campaign printed bumper stickers that declare: "Discover the Indian vote." And when Clinton appeared at a rally in Missoula, Mont.
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