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American Indians Washington State

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NEWS
November 7, 1995 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several of Washington's Native American tribes, drafting an initiative to open up unlimited casino gambling on reservation lands, wondered how they might make the measure more appealing to a wary public. Tribal leaders backing the measure said they looked at gambling revenues as a resource, not so different from the mountains and fish and timber with which the tribes are blessed. The resource, they figured, ought to be shared.
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NEWS
June 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The judge deciding the fate of a 9,300-year-old skeleton known as "Kennewick Man" said he had "very serious concerns" over the Interior secretary's decision last year awarding the remains to Indian tribes. U.S. Magistrate John Jelderks in Portland also expressed frustration at not having a story in the oral traditions of the tribes that would identify the remains of what they call "the Ancient One" as an ancestor.
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NEWS
March 24, 1990 | GEORGE HARDEEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leaders of the Puyallup Indian Tribe here will join local, state and federal officials today in signing the second largest native land settlement agreement in history. In exchange for relinquishing legal claims to thousands of acres of land owned by non-Indians in and around Tacoma, the tribe will receive $162 million in cash, real estate and economic development programs. Each of the 1,545 Puyallup tribal members over age 21 will receive a cash payment of $20,000 in the next two months.
NEWS
June 10, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court on Friday rejected the environmental assessment that allowed the Makah Indian tribe to hunt gray whales off the coast of Washington, ruling that the government's review was "slanted" in favor of allowing the controversial hunt. The 2-to-1 ruling from the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals most likely ends the Makah tribe's attempts to land a gray whale during the spring migration off the Pacific Coast, which now is winding down.
NEWS
November 2, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Makah tribal police arrested four anti-whaling protesters who entered reservation land during a demonstration over the tribe's planned whale hunt. Sea Shepherd Conservation Society official Lisa Distefano, group photographer Jan Cook of Seattle, and members Matahil Lawson of British Columbia and Ken Nichols of Hawaii were arrested on trespassing charges. All four were released.
NEWS
April 6, 1999 | Associated Press
In a victory for Washington tribes, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday affirmed their right to harvest shellfish on private beaches. The decision stunned private property owners. The court rejected without comment an appeal of a lower-court ruling that upheld the tribes' shellfish rights. State officials, shellfish growers and private property owners had challenged the decision, contending that Indians' 19th-century treaties give them no legal claim to shellfish on private property.
NEWS
May 12, 1999 | Associated Press
Bad weather, fatigue and the threat of a protest brought the Makah's whaling crew back to shore on Tuesday with no whale in tow. Accompanied by a support boat and a small flotilla of media, Coast Guard and protest vessels, the Indian tribe's crew launched its carved cedar canoe from a Pacific beach early Tuesday in hopes of intercepting a whale migrating from Mexico to the summer feeding grounds off Alaska.
NEWS
October 1, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Makah Indians are about to embark on their first gray whale hunt in 70 years, reviving a tradition that died out when the animals nearly became extinct. There is no one alive among the Makahs who has ever gone whaling, but they have heard stories and songs about it all their lives. The Makah live at the northwesternmost point of the Lower 48 states. Like their ancestors, they will strike first with a harpoon from a cedar canoe. But in a departure from tradition, they will use a .
NEWS
August 29, 1988
The Puyallup Indian tribe in Washington has voted overwhelmingly to end years of negotiations and accept a $162-million offer in return for giving up claim to one-time reservation land that includes sections of Tacoma. A legal battle for the disputed land "might've taken 20 or 30 years," and would be expensive, Gabriel Landry of the Puyallup Tribal Council said. The governing bodies involved include the federal government, the state of Washington and the city of Tacoma.
NEWS
May 9, 2000 | Associated Press
A seven-member Makah family spent the weekend hunting for a gray whale but failed to make a kill despite several close encounters. The family was watched from a distance by the U.S. Coast Guard and a flotilla of anti-whaling protest boats. Sunday's hunt was the fourth by the family in the last month. Their 10-day permit expires next week, after which they can apply for a new one. "They're not discouraged at all," said Keith Johnson, head of the Makah Whaling Commission.
NEWS
May 9, 2000 | Associated Press
A seven-member Makah family spent the weekend hunting for a gray whale but failed to make a kill despite several close encounters. The family was watched from a distance by the U.S. Coast Guard and a flotilla of anti-whaling protest boats. Sunday's hunt was the fourth by the family in the last month. Their 10-day permit expires next week, after which they can apply for a new one. "They're not discouraged at all," said Keith Johnson, head of the Makah Whaling Commission.
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | From Reuters
Whale hunters from the Makah Indian tribe harpooned a gray whale Thursday but failed to capture it after a protester riding a Jet Ski foiled the hunt that has pitted tribal rights' supporters against environmentalists trying to protect the giant beasts.
NEWS
February 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Despite the objections of Indian tribes, the federal government said Friday that DNA testing of one of the oldest skeletons found on the North American continent will go forward. On Jan. 31, the Interior Department announced a preliminary decision to conduct the tests to try to pinpoint the origin of Kennewick Man, who is more than 9,000 years old and an early Native American. Friday's final decision follows days of discussions involving five tribes and federal officials.
NEWS
May 12, 1999 | Associated Press
Bad weather, fatigue and the threat of a protest brought the Makah's whaling crew back to shore on Tuesday with no whale in tow. Accompanied by a support boat and a small flotilla of media, Coast Guard and protest vessels, the Indian tribe's crew launched its carved cedar canoe from a Pacific beach early Tuesday in hopes of intercepting a whale migrating from Mexico to the summer feeding grounds off Alaska.
NEWS
April 6, 1999 | Associated Press
In a victory for Washington tribes, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday affirmed their right to harvest shellfish on private beaches. The decision stunned private property owners. The court rejected without comment an appeal of a lower-court ruling that upheld the tribes' shellfish rights. State officials, shellfish growers and private property owners had challenged the decision, contending that Indians' 19th-century treaties give them no legal claim to shellfish on private property.
NEWS
November 2, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Makah tribal police arrested four anti-whaling protesters who entered reservation land during a demonstration over the tribe's planned whale hunt. Sea Shepherd Conservation Society official Lisa Distefano, group photographer Jan Cook of Seattle, and members Matahil Lawson of British Columbia and Ken Nichols of Hawaii were arrested on trespassing charges. All four were released.
NEWS
August 13, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a Sunday afternoon at the hydroplane races on the Columbia River. A couple of college students kicked through the shallows and stumbled upon a human skull in the muck. Cool, they thought. A murder. Soon, several people were sloshing through the sludge. By the end of the day, forensic anthropologist James Chatters had most of a skeleton laid out in his basement. It was old, clearly: no recent crime scene here.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The moon was low on the water that night, and the silvery barnacled back of the whale slid by the boat only for a moment before sinking back into the deep. You could smell him, though, the rank salt odor of bottom slime hanging on the wind. The men in the canoe slipped their oars into the water and pressed forward. This time, he blew farther in, and then farther still. Soon, the whale was backed up against the beach, pulsing uncertainly in the kelp beds in 17 feet of water.
NEWS
October 1, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Makah Indians are about to embark on their first gray whale hunt in 70 years, reviving a tradition that died out when the animals nearly became extinct. There is no one alive among the Makahs who has ever gone whaling, but they have heard stories and songs about it all their lives. The Makah live at the northwesternmost point of the Lower 48 states. Like their ancestors, they will strike first with a harpoon from a cedar canoe. But in a departure from tradition, they will use a .
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