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December 17, 1987 | CAROLINE E. MAYER, The Washington Post
As bureaucratese goes, the small print on the Department of Education student-loan form was pretty amazing: "Should the maker of the obligation tender payments thereon to the undersigned subsequent to the filing of this application, it is hereby agreed that such moneys will be accepted for and the proceeds immediately transmitted to the U.S. Office of Education."
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NEWS
October 15, 1989 | WILLIAM BOOTH, THE WASHINGTON POST
A senior executive at Ford Motor Co. wanted to reset the clock in his Ford car. Unable to figure out how to do it by himself, he reached for the owner's manual in the glove compartment. He found he couldn't understand the manual. He wasn't alone. Growing numbers of psychologists and linguists spend their days thinking about the incomprehensible instructions and unmanageable manuals that accompany the technological revolution.
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NEWS
October 15, 1989 | WILLIAM BOOTH, THE WASHINGTON POST
A senior executive at Ford Motor Co. wanted to reset the clock in his Ford car. Unable to figure out how to do it by himself, he reached for the owner's manual in the glove compartment. He found he couldn't understand the manual. He wasn't alone. Growing numbers of psychologists and linguists spend their days thinking about the incomprehensible instructions and unmanageable manuals that accompany the technological revolution.
NEWS
December 17, 1987 | CAROLINE E. MAYER, The Washington Post
As bureaucratese goes, the small print on the Department of Education student-loan form was pretty amazing: "Should the maker of the obligation tender payments thereon to the undersigned subsequent to the filing of this application, it is hereby agreed that such moneys will be accepted for and the proceeds immediately transmitted to the U.S. Office of Education."
NEWS
June 14, 2005
Regarding "An Outside Chance for Schoolkids" [June 7]: The study by the American Institutes for Research shows that the benefits to students in outdoor science classes are clear and compelling. School programs that include experiential learning, such as the Coast Alive! project, benefit children. Our coast and state parks benefit too when kids come to understand the value of our unique and irreplaceable resources. Sara Feldman Southern California director California State Parks Foundation
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Surviving two protests by a rival, Educational Testing Service has won a bid to develop and administer California's high school exit exam. ETS' $50-million bid beat that of American Institutes for Research, which developed the pilot test that was given to ninth-graders in March and May. In May, ETS, known for administering the SAT, was named the winner, but a protest by American Institutes prompted the California Department of Education to put the program out to bid again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The California Department of Education has decided to reopen bidding to find a developer for the state's high school graduation test. The department has withdrawn its decision of last month to award the contract to Educational Testing Service, a New Jersey company known for administering the SAT and the GRE.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2001
Educational Testing Service has won the bidding to develop and administer California's high school exit exam over the next three years. The New Jersey company, known for administering the SAT and GRE, beat out three rivals, including American Institutes for Research which developed the pilot test that was given to ninth-graders in March. This year's ninth-graders and subsequent classes will have to pass the exam during their high school years to earn a diploma.
NEWS
January 25, 2000
With a deadline looming, California education officials picked American Institutes for Research to develop the state's high school exit exam. AIR is a Washington-based company with a West Coast office in Palo Alto. The exit exam is a math and language arts test that California students must pass to graduate from high school. The Class of 2004 will be the first high school class required to pass the exam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dr. S. Paul Ehrlich Jr., 72, who served as acting surgeon general for four years and lobbied against cigarette smoking, died of pneumonia Thursday in Delray Beach, Fla. He had multiple sclerosis. Ehrlich, first appointed by President Nixon in 1973, was among six people holding the office who urged Congress to ban smoking in public buildings. The six doctors also asked legislators to enact stricter controls on secondhand smoke and the sale and advertising of tobacco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1995
Not content with spending billions on reconnaissance satellites, communications intercepts and secret agents, the U.S. government for nearly two decades has also funded a program to try to divine information using people who claim to have psychic powers. The negligible results should have been, well, foreseen. An independent review panel has now recommended scrapping the program, code-named Stargate, which was run by the Defense Intelligence Agency. The program has cost about $20 million.
OPINION
February 10, 2014 | By Sarah Amandolare
Last October, in between arguments over the debt ceiling, the federal government somehow found time to send me an email. My student loan payment was 70 days past due, the message read, so the government had negatively reported me to each major credit bureau and would continue to report me until my account was brought current. I'm betting the government sent out a lot of those letters to people like me: college graduates from middle-class families who didn't qualify for much in the way of scholarship aid and had parents who couldn't afford to pay for their schooling.
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