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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The number of books threatened with removal from library shelves dropped last year to its lowest total on record, with 405 challenges reported to the American Library Assn. The ALA has been tracking efforts to pull texts since the early 1980s, when it helped found Banned Books Week as a celebration of free expression. The 25th annual "Banned Books" program takes place Sept. 23-30 as libraries and bookstores highlight works that have been removed or faced removal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The number of books threatened with removal from library shelves dropped last year to its lowest total on record, with 405 challenges reported to the American Library Assn. The ALA has been tracking efforts to pull texts since the early 1980s, when it helped found Banned Books Week as a celebration of free expression. The 25th annual "Banned Books" program takes place Sept. 23-30 as libraries and bookstores highlight works that have been removed or faced removal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1999 | ERIKA MILVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Comstockery and bowdlerism have been menacing artistic expression since long before the eras of either Anthony Comstock or Thomas Bowlder, the men whose names became wedded to literary censorship. Bowlder published a G-rated volume of Shakespeare in 1818, and Comstock, as secretary of the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice in the 1870s, helped destroy 160 tons of literature and pictures he deemed immoral.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
A book about a Japanese American girl growing up in the South and another about a kitten who mistakes the moon for her bowl of milk garnered top honors on Monday from the American Library Assn. "Kira-Kira," by Cynthia Kadohata, received the 2005 John Newbery Medal at the ALA's annual meeting in Boston. The award honors outstanding writing in a book for young people. A 15-member committee of librarians and children's literature experts selected "Kira-Kira," said committee head Susan Faust.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
A book about a Japanese American girl growing up in the South and another about a kitten who mistakes the moon for her bowl of milk garnered top honors on Monday from the American Library Assn. "Kira-Kira," by Cynthia Kadohata, received the 2005 John Newbery Medal at the ALA's annual meeting in Boston. The award honors outstanding writing in a book for young people. A 15-member committee of librarians and children's literature experts selected "Kira-Kira," said committee head Susan Faust.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department on Monday issued proposed regulations to control the spread of child pornography, but the action brought immediate criticism and the promise of renewed litigation from arts, library and publishing groups.
NEWS
September 27, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
The American Library Assn. on Monday began its seventh annual Banned Books Week, a campaign designed to focus attention on the dangers of censorship. The association maintains a group that monitors attempts to ban books at libraries and schools nationwide. Some of the titles from its 1987-88 list of "Books Some People Consider Dangerous" include: * "The Wizard of Oz" by Lyman Frank Baum, challenged in Church Hill, Tenn.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI ran background checks on more than 250 Americans who protested a controversial library surveillance program in an effort to learn whether the critics were backed by Soviet intelligence services, according to FBI documents released Saturday. An FBI spokesman acknowledged that the bureau had run "minimal checks" on critics of the program, but he insisted that the FBI had not undertaken a large-scale effort to discredit librarians or civil libertarians who objected to the library visits.
BOOKS
March 6, 1988 | ALEX RAKSIN
While some of us had the chance to visit Indian pueblos when we were in school, we were still left with the impression that these were settlements rather than remnants of civilizations. This thinking was no doubt influenced by our textbooks, which looked back at the descendants of our nation's family--the Greeks and Romans--rather than at the older, roughly comparable progenitors of our land--the Mayas and the Aztecs.
BOOKS
February 8, 1987 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
Maybe Sid Fleischman should take more showers. "There's a call from Chicago," his wife, Betty, told him while he was sudsing away the week before last. "I don't know anybody in Chicago," he called back. After he had dried off, the Santa Monica writer called back and learned the telephonic missive had not been a plea to speak at some conference or convention. ("Children's writers are called on a great deal for speeches," Fleischman explained.) Instead, it was the American Library Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1999 | ERIKA MILVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Comstockery and bowdlerism have been menacing artistic expression since long before the eras of either Anthony Comstock or Thomas Bowlder, the men whose names became wedded to literary censorship. Bowlder published a G-rated volume of Shakespeare in 1818, and Comstock, as secretary of the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice in the 1870s, helped destroy 160 tons of literature and pictures he deemed immoral.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department on Monday issued proposed regulations to control the spread of child pornography, but the action brought immediate criticism and the promise of renewed litigation from arts, library and publishing groups.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI ran background checks on more than 250 Americans who protested a controversial library surveillance program in an effort to learn whether the critics were backed by Soviet intelligence services, according to FBI documents released Saturday. An FBI spokesman acknowledged that the bureau had run "minimal checks" on critics of the program, but he insisted that the FBI had not undertaken a large-scale effort to discredit librarians or civil libertarians who objected to the library visits.
NEWS
September 27, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
The American Library Assn. on Monday began its seventh annual Banned Books Week, a campaign designed to focus attention on the dangers of censorship. The association maintains a group that monitors attempts to ban books at libraries and schools nationwide. Some of the titles from its 1987-88 list of "Books Some People Consider Dangerous" include: * "The Wizard of Oz" by Lyman Frank Baum, challenged in Church Hill, Tenn.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2011
A privacy-rights group said it plans to file a complaint with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission over Facebook Inc.'s facial-recognition feature for photo tagging. The Electronic Privacy Information Center, based in Washington, is working on the complaint and will present it to the agency today or tomorrow, Marc Rotenberg, the group's executive director, said in an interview. Other privacy and consumer groups plan to sign onto the complaint, Rotenberg said, declining to identify them.
BOOKS
June 20, 1993 | SUZANNE CURLEY
Outsiders have always been "in" in young-adult fiction. Those who deviate from the norm--especially amid the intense peer pressure of teen-age years--may make us uncomfortable in real life but fascinate us in the pages of a book. The reason could be that reading about characters whose outward appearance or behavior or life circumstances set them apart is a safe way to explore the pain of our own feelings of separateness.
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