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American Masters

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012
'American Masters' Where: KOCE When: Margaret Mitchell: 9 p.m.; Harper Lee: 10 p.m. Monday Rating: TV-PG-L (may be unsuitable for young children with an advisory for coarse language)
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Mary McNamara
"American Masters -- Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth” A lovely and lyrical tribute to the great American novelist, poet, essayist and activist airs just two days before she turns 70 and helps kick off Black History Month. Obviously, it shouldn't require an African American-themed event to warrant a tribute to Walker, and  “Beauty in Truth” reminds us how singular and extraordinary Walker's life and work remain. Best known for her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel "The Color Purple," she is a woman who speaks softly, writes beautifully, draws strength from nature and refuses to follow conventions of any sort.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2010
Where: KCET When: 8 p.m. Monday Rating: TV-14 (may be unsuitable for children under the age of 14) 'American Masters' Where: KCET When: 9:30 p.m. Monday Rating: TV-PG-L (may be unsuitable for young children with an advisory for coarse language)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The PBS television series " American Masters" will debut its profile of Alice Walker on Feb. 7, shortly before the author's 70th birthday. While Walker has written novels, poetry and nonfiction, she is best known for her novel "The Color Purple. " Published in 1983, it won both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, and was made into the film directed by Steven Spielberg. Danny Glover, one of the stars of that film, appears in the documentary about Walker and its preview, above.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The PBS television series " American Masters" will debut its profile of Alice Walker on Feb. 7, shortly before the author's 70th birthday. While Walker has written novels, poetry and nonfiction, she is best known for her novel "The Color Purple. " Published in 1983, it won both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, and was made into the film directed by Steven Spielberg. Danny Glover, one of the stars of that film, appears in the documentary about Walker and its preview, above.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Critically acclaimed documentary producer Susan Lacy, creator of "American Masters," is leaving public television for pay cable. Lacy, who has been involved with PBS and its New York City affiliate WNET for close to 30 years, has signed a multi-year contract with HBO to produce and direct documentaries. The deal is a big get for Sheila Nevins, president of HBO's documentary unit. PHOTOS: Cable versus broadcast ratings "I've long admired her film portraits, which have been consistently stellar over the years," Nevins said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2012 | By Matt Cooper
Click here to download TV listings for the week Dec. 23 - 29 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES Nikita: The action-drama starring Maggie Q encores its third-season premiere (8 p.m. KTLA). I Love the 1880s: The satirical series sends up Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, the Wright Brothers and other nerdy types in this new episode (9 p.m. History). Say Yes to the Dress: The wedding-themed reality series is back for another season (9 p.m. TLC)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Do I get paid for this?" says Mel Brooks at the end of Robert Trachtenberg's biographical documentary, "Mel Brooks: Make a Noise," premiering Monday as part of the PBS series "American Masters. " "If this program was called 'Dutch Masters,' I'd have boxes of cigars. But I had to be foolish and settle for 'American Masters.'" Writer, director, comedian, actor, producer, songwriter and drummer (because, as a drummer, you "made the most noise"), Brooks, who turns 87 this year, is in the midst of a long public moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
Pop music has rarely sounded more elegantly silky than when Sam Cooke sang "You Send Me," the dreamily romantic 1957 hit that first put the Chicago singer and songwriter at the top of the national sales chart and primed him for a key role as African Americans started to assert real power in the music business. That role was cut short when Cooke was shot and killed outside a Watts motel room in December 1964, a sad finale to a life that had been blessed with a remarkable musical gift.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014
FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC) "12 Years a Slave" -- Joe Walker "Captain Phillips" -- Chris Rouse, A.C.E. "Gravity" -- Alfonso Cuarón and Mark Sanger "Her" -- Eric Zumbrunnen, A.C.E., and Jeff Buchanan "Saving Mr. Banks" -- Mark Livolsi, A.C.E. FEATURE FILM (COMEDY OR MUSICAL) "American Hustle" -- Jay Cassidy, A.C.E., Crispin Struthers and Alan Baumgarten, A.C.E. "August: Osage County" -- Stephen Mirrione, A.C.E. "Inside Llewyn Davis" -- Roderick Jaynes "Nebraska -- Kevin Tent, A.C.E.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train A Comin'," which premieres Tuesday on PBS, inducts the (very) late guitarist, singer and songwriter into the PBS hall of "American Masters. " It's a sometimes-enlightening, regularly exciting, always watchable documentary that hits the main points of a short life. Still, viewers not already versed and invested in this music and milieu might want a little deeper context. Hendrix, who died at 27, has been gone for 43 years now. He was most assuredly a creature of his time, with his headbands and ruffles and psychedelic philosophizing, and yet he exists outside of time, one of those artists like Thelonious Monk, Miles Davis or Bill Monroe you could study forever, profitably, and never crack their secret.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"I watched it for a little while," sang the late Lou Reed, of a satellite that went way up to Mars. "I love to watch things on TV. " TV watched him for a little while, too, once that whole video thing got going and his importance as a songwriter and performer was widely established. Reed, who died Sunday, began as the principal songwriter and vocalist of the Velvet Underground -- along with Elvis and the Beatles, one of the three most influential rock acts of the 20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Critically acclaimed documentary producer Susan Lacy, creator of "American Masters," is leaving public television for pay cable. Lacy, who has been involved with PBS and its New York City affiliate WNET for close to 30 years, has signed a multi-year contract with HBO to produce and direct documentaries. The deal is a big get for Sheila Nevins, president of HBO's documentary unit. PHOTOS: Cable versus broadcast ratings "I've long admired her film portraits, which have been consistently stellar over the years," Nevins said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Forty years ago, Billie Jean King played Bobby Riggs in the most famous tennis match in American history. Dubbed "The Battle of the Sexes," it was as much a contest of ideologies as athleticism. King represented the fight for women's rights, and Riggs, who proudly identified himself as a male chauvinist pig, stood in for the patriarchy. Millions tuned into the wildly hyped telecast, many of whom had never seen a tennis match. When King soundly beat Riggs (who, though a former champion himself, was 26 years her senior)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Carol Burnett, the trailblazing comedienne whose variety show was a top draw on CBS for over a decade, was named the winner of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor on Tuesday. Burnett, 80, will receive the award in an Oct. 20 in a ceremony to be broadcast Oct. 30 on PBS. “It's almost impossible to be funnier than the people in Washington,” said the star, who clearly hasn't lost her sense of humor, in a written statement. PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times Despite a career that spans Broadway, film and television, Burnett remains best known for “The Carol Burnett Show,” which ran from 1967 to 1978.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
"The Newlywed Game" is renewing its TV vows. Episodes of the veteran game show that pits newly married couples against each other are being revived on Bounce TV, which is geared toward African Americans. The series, which first premiered on ABC in 1965, has been on and off the air on various networks and in syndication since its launch. These episodes were previously produced for the Game Show Network. But founding host Bob Eubanks, the personality most identified with the show, will not be along for the ride this go-round.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Do I get paid for this?" says Mel Brooks at the end of Robert Trachtenberg's biographical documentary, "Mel Brooks: Make a Noise," premiering Monday as part of the PBS series "American Masters. " "If this program was called 'Dutch Masters,' I'd have boxes of cigars. But I had to be foolish and settle for 'American Masters.'" Writer, director, comedian, actor, producer, songwriter and drummer (because, as a drummer, you "made the most noise"), Brooks, who turns 87 this year, is in the midst of a long public moment.
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