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November 11, 2009 | John Hoeffel
The American Medical Assn. on Tuesday urged the federal government to reconsider its classification of marijuana as a dangerous drug with no accepted medical use, a significant shift that puts the prestigious group behind calls for more research. The nation's largest physicians organization, with about 250,000 member doctors, the AMA has maintained since 1997 that marijuana should remain a Schedule I controlled substance, the most restrictive category, which also includes heroin and LSD. In changing its policy, the group said its goal was to clear the way to conduct clinical research, develop cannabis-based medicines and devise alternative ways to deliver the drug.
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NATIONAL
November 11, 2009 | John Hoeffel
The American Medical Assn. on Tuesday urged the federal government to reconsider its classification of marijuana as a dangerous drug with no accepted medical use, a significant shift that puts the prestigious group behind calls for more research. The nation's largest physicians organization, with about 250,000 member doctors, the AMA has maintained since 1997 that marijuana should remain a Schedule I controlled substance, the most restrictive category, which also includes heroin and LSD. In changing its policy, the group said its goal was to clear the way to conduct clinical research, develop cannabis-based medicines and devise alternative ways to deliver the drug.
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BUSINESS
August 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
The American Medical Assn. is spending $1 million to tell doctors not to accept big gifts from drug companies--in an education campaign funded mostly by drug companies. Critics expressed amazement about the AMA's use of industry funding. "Whoever is making decisions over there seems to be just brain-dead," Dr. Sidney Wolfe, director of the consumer-oriented Public Citizen Health Research Group, said Wednesday. "This is just prostitution." The AMA said a spokesman was not immediately available.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2009 | Kim Geiger and Tom Hamburger
The American Medical Assn., after 60 years of opposing any government overhaul of healthcare, is now lobbying and advertising to win public support for President Obama's sweeping plan -- a proposal that promises hundreds of billions of dollars for America's doctors. Of all the interest groups that have won favorable terms in closed-door negotiations this year, the association representing the nation's physicians may have taken home the biggest prizes, including an agreement to stop planned cuts in Medicare payments that are worth $228 billion to doctors over 10 years.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2009 | Kim Geiger and Tom Hamburger
The American Medical Assn., after 60 years of opposing any government overhaul of healthcare, is now lobbying and advertising to win public support for President Obama's sweeping plan -- a proposal that promises hundreds of billions of dollars for America's doctors. Of all the interest groups that have won favorable terms in closed-door negotiations this year, the association representing the nation's physicians may have taken home the biggest prizes, including an agreement to stop planned cuts in Medicare payments that are worth $228 billion to doctors over 10 years.
NEWS
April 24, 1996 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The American Medical Assn., elevating its anti-smoking drive to a new level, called Tuesday for all investors to sell their shares in 13 tobacco companies and 1,474 mutual funds that hold tobacco securities. The step was the most sweeping call yet by a major public health organization for divestiture of tobacco stocks.
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department's antitrust chief warned the medical profession Tuesday that doctors and dentists are under investigation by federal grand juries in three cities for possible price-fixing and that violators face up to three years in prison if convicted. In the first such public warning, Assistant Atty. Gen. Charles F. Rule told a Dallas meeting of the American Medical Assn.'s house of delegates: "We are on the lookout for other possible violations that merit criminal investigation."
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Michigan chiropractor James Gregg recalled his shock and wonder when a cardiologist on the staff of New Center Hospital in Detroit strode up recently and thrust four medical charts into his hands. "These patients are complaining of chest pains and I can't find anything," he said gravely, according to Gregg. "You want to take a look?" When Gregg recovered from his surprise at being consulted by a heart specialist, he hurried to check out the patients.
NEWS
November 27, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a key case involving the rights of the homeless, the Supreme Court Monday let stand New York City's ban on begging by panhandlers in its subway system. Without comment or dissent, the high court refused to reconsider an appeals court ruling in May which said that beggars are a "menace to the common good" who do not have a free-speech right to ask others for money. The court's action does not set a binding national rule of law because the appeal was dismissed without a formal opinion.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2007 | From the Chicago Tribune
An American Medical Assn. committee meeting in Chicago to consider its future public health agenda asked its policymaking body Sunday to determine whether to support adding video game addiction to a key handbook on mental illness. Testimony at the AMA annual meeting seemed to favor deferring to the American Psychiatric Assn., which will make the final call as it writes a new edition of a diagnostic manual for mental health professionals.
NATIONAL
June 16, 2009 | Bruce Japsen, John McCormick and Noam N. Levey
President Obama on Monday made his most detailed pitch yet for a $1-trillion overhaul of the nation's burdened healthcare system, calling it a "ticking time bomb" that threatens the nation's prosperity. Throughout his speech to the nation's largest doctors group, Obama sought to inoculate himself against opponents who have suggested his proposal would amount to a government takeover of healthcare.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2009 | Associated Press
The American Medical Assn. is joining several state medical associations in suing health insurers Aetna Inc. and Cigna Corp. over a database they say was rigged to underpay doctors on out-of-network claims for more than a decade. But Cigna said doctors' rates were part of the problem. The lawsuits heap more criticism on Ingenix Inc. data that already have cost UnitedHealth Group Inc. of Minnetonka, Minn., $350 million to settle a separate lawsuit involving the AMA.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2008 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Insurance companies often fail to properly reimburse doctors, needlessly adding more than $200 billion a year to the nation's healthcare tab, the American Medical Assn. said Monday. An analysis of 3 million medical claims over a six-month period beginning in October also found that doctors in the U.S. spend 14% of the fees they receive from insurers and Medicare on the process of collecting those fees, the AMA said in a report issued at its annual meeting in Chicago.
NATIONAL
August 24, 2007 | Claudia Lauer, Times Staff Writer
The American Medical Assn., seeking to influence the healthcare debate in the 2008 election, kicked off a three-year, multimillion-dollar ad campaign at a news conference Thursday to promote its plan to provide health coverage for the estimated 45 million people in America who lack insurance. "There's a misconception about who the uninsured are," said Dr. Nancy H. Nielsen, the AMA's president-elect. "One in seven people are uninsured . . .
BUSINESS
June 28, 2007 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Video-game buffs might feel hooked on their favorite titles, but they won't be officially addicted anytime soon. Saying the issue needed more study, the American Medical Assn. on Wednesday scaled back a controversial proposal that sought to declare excessive video-game playing a mental disorder akin to pathological gambling. The association also decided against urging parents to limit to two hours a day the amount of time their kids play video games, watch television and surf the Internet.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2007 | From the Chicago Tribune
An American Medical Assn. committee meeting in Chicago to consider its future public health agenda asked its policymaking body Sunday to determine whether to support adding video game addiction to a key handbook on mental illness. Testimony at the AMA annual meeting seemed to favor deferring to the American Psychiatric Assn., which will make the final call as it writes a new edition of a diagnostic manual for mental health professionals.
NEWS
November 13, 1987 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The American Medical Assn., taking note of public statements by some doctors refusing to treat patients infected with the AIDS virus, advised physicians Thursday that it is unethical to deny care in such situations if the care required is within the doctor's normal range of practice.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2007 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Video-game buffs might feel hooked on their favorite titles, but they won't be officially addicted anytime soon. Saying the issue needed more study, the American Medical Assn. on Wednesday scaled back a controversial proposal that sought to declare excessive video-game playing a mental disorder akin to pathological gambling. The association also decided against urging parents to limit to two hours a day the amount of time their kids play video games, watch television and surf the Internet.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The American Medical Assn., holding its annual meeting in Atlanta, is weighing whether to support importing prescription drugs from outside the U.S. "We owe it to our patients to advocate for safe importation of drugs," Stephanie Stanton, a voting AMA delegate and medical student from the University of Minnesota, said at a meeting of the House of Delegates. "This is all because of our patients, and it is driven by our patients."
NATIONAL
May 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
CHICAGO --The American Medical Assn. board has rejected a $1.6-million loan request from its pioneering doctors union, touching off a battle for its survival. Dr. Mark Fox, president of the union, Physicians for Responsible Negotiation, said Thursday that the board's move was unexpected and "has really cut the legs off the organization." "Since the AMA has been our sole source of funding, at this point it puts us in a bind," Fox said. He said the union's money probably will run out this summer.
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