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OPINION
September 10, 1995
"How Safe Are Mobile Homes?"(Aug. 20) leaves the impression that manufactured homes are inherently unsafe as a result of industry resistance to enhanced safety proposals and other consumer-related measures. While we appreciate your positive comments "that the average mobile home being built today is a good product," we feel that the article contains several inaccurate and misleading statements. On the overall issue of federal installation standards as an answer to the "shoddy" installation of manufactured homes, the article misses a key point--that federal installation standards are not the most effective and cost-efficient way to address this issue.
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OPINION
September 10, 1995
"How Safe Are Mobile Homes?"(Aug. 20) leaves the impression that manufactured homes are inherently unsafe as a result of industry resistance to enhanced safety proposals and other consumer-related measures. While we appreciate your positive comments "that the average mobile home being built today is a good product," we feel that the article contains several inaccurate and misleading statements. On the overall issue of federal installation standards as an answer to the "shoddy" installation of manufactured homes, the article misses a key point--that federal installation standards are not the most effective and cost-efficient way to address this issue.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1989 | Richard O'Reilly and Richard O'Reilly, RICHARD O'REILLY designs microcomputer applications for The Times
One of the first things you learn upon acquiring a personal computer is how difficult it is to fit on a desk. There are all those parts--the main computer box, a monitor, a keyboard, probably a printer and maybe an external disk drive or an external modem or even a CD-ROM drive. But there is a lot more to setting up a computer properly than just finding a place to put everything and enough electrical outlets to plug the equipment in. Your health and well-being may even be at stake.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1989 | Richard O'Reilly and Richard O'Reilly, RICHARD O'REILLY designs microcomputer applications for The Times
One of the first things you learn upon acquiring a personal computer is how difficult it is to fit on a desk. There are all those parts--the main computer box, a monitor, a keyboard, probably a printer and maybe an external disk drive or an external modem or even a CD-ROM drive. But there is a lot more to setting up a computer properly than just finding a place to put everything and enough electrical outlets to plug the equipment in. Your health and well-being may even be at stake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1992 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traffic radar guns, which save lives by catching speeders, have come under suspicion as a possible cause of cancer in traffic officers exposed to their microwave beams, triggering a series of lawsuits by an Agoura Hills lawyer. Attorney John E. Sweeney has filed suits on behalf of five former traffic officers who contracted cancer and are seeking millions of dollars in damages from radar equipment manufacturers, whom they accuse of failing to warn of health risks.
TRAVEL
October 12, 2008
I read with interest the Oct. 5 Travel section article "Tour de Sand," as this is a bicycle path my husband and I have ridden many times and always enjoyed. Under "Tips for the Road: Ride Smart," I would like to add what is the most important word of advice to any cyclist any place and any age: Always wear an American National Standards Institute-approved bicycle helmet. Marilyn Vassos Irvine
BUSINESS
December 14, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Study Finds Cellular Phones Within Safety Standards: Levels of radio waves emitted by hand-held cellular telephones fall well within safety standards, according to a study for the National Institutes of Health. The study, to be released today, was conducted by Om Gandhi, an expert on radio frequencies at the University of Utah, It was funded in part by McCaw Cellular Communications Inc.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1989 | From United Press International
The government today announced a voluntary labeling system to rate non-prescription sunglasses for protection against harmful ultraviolet light from the sun. The labeling program was developed by the Sunglass Assn. of America with the Food and Drug Administration and is based on a recent report by the American National Standards Institute. The FDA said it already has begun to be phased in, placing non-prescription sunglasses in one of three categories: --Cosmetic sunglasses, recommended for use in shopping and other activities around town in "non-harsh" sunlight; --General purpose sunglasses, recommended for outdoor activities such as boating, driving, flying or hiking; --Special purpose sunglasses, recommended for activities in especially bright sunlight, such as skiing.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | MARY MAUSHARD, BALTIMORE EVENING SUN
Overzealous bicyclists can strain their muscles or grow saddle sore, but the injuries that most need to be prevented are head injuries, those "that doctors can't fix," says a local pediatrician. "The serious injuries and the ones from which children do not recover are the head injuries," says Dr. Modena Wilson, a pediatrician at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1989
Los Angeles is getting the jump on the state of California in requiring that all new toilets installed in the city be new, ultra-low-flow models. Beginning July 1, a city ordinance sponsored by Councilwoman Ruth Galanter goes into effect requiring that new toilets use no more than 1.6 gallons per flush. Standard toilets consume anywhere from 3 to 6 gallons. Since about 25,000 new toilets are installed in Los Angeles every month, city officials estimate that the ordinance will save nearly 500 million gallons of water in the first year.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1992 | Associated Press
Hewlett-Packard Co. introduced a fiber-optical card Monday that promises to give businesses cheap access to high-speed supercomputer technology. The HOLC-0266 optical-link card is the first product to result from a development and marketing alliance between Hewlett-Packard and International Business Machines Corp. The card is designed to tap a growing need among businesses and hospitals for computerized graphics and video displays.
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