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American Revolution

ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2000 | GREGG KILDAY, Gregg Kilday is a Hollywood correspondent for Salon.com
"The American Revolution was an economic conflict that turned into a political conflict," says film director Roland Emmerich, his enthusiasm palpable, sounding a bit like a perpetual grad student who's about to face his oral exams. "That's very unusual. A lot of wars start for ideological reasons and then become more about economic power. But the American Revolution turned that around."
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NEWS
January 10, 1989 | From Reuters
President Reagan today proudly described the economic record of his Administration as a second American revolution that had inspired the world. "Just as the first American Revolution, which began with the shot heard 'round the world, inspired people everywhere who dreamed of freedom, so has this second American revolution inspired changes throughout the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2010 | By Jennifer James
The boy's only light was the firelight. It flickered on the walls of the log cabin and danced in his deep, serious brown eyes. It was late -- the middle of the night -- his favorite time of day -- his time for reading. He especially liked to read Aesop's fables, the Bible and "The Life of Washington. " George Washington's words flickered in the firelight: "The time is now near at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves; whether they are to have any property they can call their own; whether their houses and farms are to be pillaged and destroyed, and themselves consigned to a state of wretchedness from which no human efforts will deliver them . . . . Our cruel and unrelenting enemy leaves us only the choice of brave resistance, or the most abject submission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1985 | Joseph Kraft
The "Second American Revolution" was killed two weeks ago in an obscure Senate committee vote against President Reagan's nomination of William Bradford Reynolds to be associate attorney general. A lot of history, to be sure, separated that vote from the collection of grievances known as the "Second American Revolution."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It's exciting, it's suspenseful, it's a big Boston Tea Party of a PBS event. So give me "Liberty!" or give me nothing! Airing here in three parts, this documentary about the Revolutionary War is that dazzling--a great old story retold smartly and captivatingly with folk melodies, splendid reenactments, historians' lively comments and costumed actors addressing the camera persuasively as both 18th century VIPs and ordinary citizens.
OPINION
January 10, 2013
Re "Holocaust's children," Column One, Jan. 4 Doris Small's story, in which she escaped Nazi Germany before World War II thanks to the rescue mission Kindertransport, is indeed very moving and poignant. But let's not forget that there was an effort by a few Americans to actually try to do the same thing the British government was doing then. It was Eleanor Roosevelt who in 1939 urged her husband to support a bill in Congress to allow 20,000 Jewish children to come to America and be temporarily adopted by American parents for the duration of the hostility.
OPINION
July 4, 2013 | By David Lefer
Had it not been for America's founding conservatives, we would not be celebrating Independence Day on July 4. In fact, it's unlikely we would be celebrating our independence at all. Few people today realize how similar the Revolutionary era was to our own: Endless war, financial crashes and mounting public debt, popular outrage against rich bankers and taxation, and such bitter partisan dispute that Congress was frequently deadlocked for months on...
NEWS
April 29, 2007 | David Weber, Associated Press
Paul Revere gets all the glory for his midnight ride. After all, it's a stirring tale of patriotism told by a great storyteller. But one young messenger who called the colonists to arms during a remarkable five-day dash across five states is a mere footnote -- a man mentioned in historical documents that didn't even get his first name right. They called him Trail. His name was Israel Bissell, and he is one of the Revolutionary War's most unheralded heroes.
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